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  • Studebaker Step

    This was/is originally posted in the pictures forum:
    I am however interested in what the members of this forum can tell me about this step, while it's not a car or truck part it is defiantly Studebaker. when you look at it on the original site there is more info on it.
    there is one picture of the step here http://d60433.deviantart.com/(they don't seem to have compatible links) and yet another Here.

  • #2
    It looks like what he says what it is, a buggy step. I guess it could be a rubble seat step too.

    JDP/Maryland
    "I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it."
    Thomas Jefferson
    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      It is just a Buggy step, probably used on many horse drawn Studebaker vehicles, it is just missing the wagon, buggy, carriage etc. [:0]

      StudeRich
      Studebakers Northwest
      Ferndale, WA
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        A rumble seat step? from what model Studebaker? it was found in an area of Idaho where Dr's buggies were common and the Butch Cassidy and the wild Bunch used to ride through.

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        • #5
          As Rich and John mentioned, this is a step off of a horse drawn vehicle and I have one like it in my collection (yours would make it a pair ). While I am no expert, my buggies all have round steps. As Studebaker built a vast variety of vehicles, I would expect that the step they utilized crossed may different models.

          Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

          See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

          Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
          Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

          The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

          �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

          For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

          "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

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          • #6
            No, Bob, this wouldn't have been used on another maker's vehicle. The steps produced for, utilized by, other manufacturers had the SB stamp on the bottom. It usually read, "Studebaker foundry works," or something to that effect (sorry, I just can't remember exactly). That foundry mark has led to the mis-identification of many vehicles as Studebakers when they really weren't.

            This step, however, is indeed a studebaker light-wagon's step. Buggies and Carriage steps were oval or round. Often, the rear seat, in a Spring Wagon, was accessed by two steps that were mounted on the brake bar and another mounted directly by a short tang to the bottom of the box. The tang came straight out instead of such long fingers like the illustrated step shows. The pad (what you step on showing the Studebaker script), though, was identical between the two types. This kind of step was found on spring wagons produced by the company in the tens of thousands. They were produced not only for domestic sales, but for export as well. Studebaker wagons, buggies, and carriages can still be found in service round the world.

            I tried to include the picture, but I couldn't do so. I think the permissions on the website wouldn't allow me to.


            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
            Ron Smith
            Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
            Ron Smith
            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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            • #7
              so your telling me that this is th e step off a light wagon not off a buggy? I did post where this came from didn't I? from an old ranch outside Pocotello Idaho.

              if a websites permissions don't allow linking the downloading and reposting are an option.

              Tollhouse CA is just as obscure as Lewiston Ca if not more so.

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              • #8
                quote:Tollhouse CA is just as obscure as Lewiston Ca if not more so.

                this is most certainly true (LOL)!

                I stand corrected on the posting pictures. I confess to being lazy, it's mine, I own it.[:I]

                quote:I did post where this came from didn't I? from an old ranch outside Pocotello Idaho.
                Have I missed something in another thread? I looked this one over again and didn't find that referrence.

                Yes, this is a good example of a light wagon step. The larger, or freight, wagons had an entirely different type of step. Keep in mind though, people used whatever came to hand back in the day. If there was a wrecked buggy or wagon on the ranch, they used parts from that to repair what needed doing. ...Kind of like today!

                This, and a total lack of documentation, leads to a lot of confusion in the Antique Vehicle resto. crowd. Many an argument has broken out in a (carriage) driving club about an example that was 'restored to original with the original steps' out in the barn. Hmmm... also kinda like some car clubs I know of.

                Fact remains, wagon steps were almost always square and larger, and carriage-buggy steps oval and round. The exception on rear steps for carriages would be those with fenders. These would be easy to spot as they have a tang or two bolt holes front, rear, or both, for carriage-head bolts allowing the attachment of fenders.


                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is the step that is on the buggy pictured below (sorry it is blurry)




                  Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

                  See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

                  Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                  Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                  The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                  �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                  For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                  "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    yes this looks very famillar

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                    • #11
                      this is where I originally posted this topic, before I was informed i should move it, and I'm glad I did.

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                      • #12
                        Oh... boy. Um, Gary, are the axles stamped Studebaker as well, and did the vehicle come with a company tag? Usually the tag is located on the rear axle-cap and is secured with two small screws? Sometimes the tag will have been moved under the seat cushion. It's safer there. It would have been unusual for Studebaker to have used that kind of step for a buggy.

                        quote:As Rich and John mentioned, this is a step off of a horse drawn vehicle and I have one like it in my collection (yours would make it a pair ).
                        Are both steps on your buggy shaped like that? If only one is, then I'd say the square is a replacement. Also, Buggies were ordered from a catalogue. Hence I say 'unusual' in regards to the square steps. They could be ordered that way. Studebaker was even more flexible with the Horse-drawn vehicles than motor.

                        Lastly, that step looks a touch rusty. It is very important to keep these painted. Rust will weaken the supports making the step unsafe. It would be wise to dismount it and paint. They're mounted by two through-bolts to the body-frame inside the body and a third screw into the floor. The carriage bolts should have square nuts, by the way. In fact, there should be no hex-nuts anywhere on the vehicle except the hubs or possibly a shaft/pole shackle. Oh, yes, and on the fifth-wheel pin. Also, all screws should be slot, no Phillips at all.

                        quote:this is where I originally posted this topic, before I was informed i should move it, and I'm glad I did.
                        Jim, there's no link showing on my screen. Did you intend to insert a link?


                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ron,

                          There is a tag on the back of the buggy and both of the steps are the same. The shafts need repainting and I plan to clean up and redo the steps at the same time.



                          I am fortunate that my mother worked at Hickory Ridge Carriage back in the '80's and I was able to buy about 50 pounds of used slotted screws and square bolts they had used in restoring carriages. I never dreamed I would be using them on my own.

                          Gary

                          Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

                          See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

                          Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                          Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                          The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                          �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                          For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                          "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                          Comment

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