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1956 Golden Hawk on Ebay

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  • 1956 Golden Hawk on Ebay

    If think this hawk has been on Ebay at least 3 times in the last 12 months. You wonder if it the same owner unable to sell, or new owners trying to resell it.

    http://tinyurl.com/6lrorh

  • #2
    well, since the pics are only thumbnails, I'd be hesitant to bid even if I did have the $$.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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    • #3
      That car has been on ebay as well as classic car classified sites for some time. My first rememberance was at a
      classsic car lot in Purcellville, Va couple of years back.

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      • #4
        The 56 belongs to Jim Brown. He sold under the name of JB Motors out of Elkhart In. Listed in TW 3-4 years ago. Jim

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        • #5
          More to the point: The salient feature of a 1956 Golden Hawk is the honkin' big Packard V-8. While the 454 Chevy now in it is probably just as big, the car has been neutered of its most distinquishing feature...hence the market is soft.

          Who wants a documented 1957 factory fuel-injected 1957 Chevrolet 150 if it is now powered by an Olds 350 V-8, no matter how nicely done is the conversion? (Yes, I know; somebody would buy the factory fuelie Chevy to build a clone with a 1957 fuelie block, but the market isn't that strong for 1956 Golden Hawks, to "reconvert" them to Packard V-8s.) BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by DieselJim

            The 56 belongs to Jim Brown. He sold under the name of JB Motors out of Elkhart In. Listed in TW 3-4 years ago.
            I do not remember Jim Brown/Ron Royce having the 56J that is subject of this thread, but I could be wrong

            JB Automotive did have 4 '56 Golden Hawks including the Tangerine/Snowcap White we went out looking for in Granger, IN yesterday. It too is currently on eBay ...might you be thinking of that one???


            <h4>The older I get ...the better I was! </h4>

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            • #7
              I agree, BP. I love the color combo, wheels, and even the interior. But I admit to being turned off by the engine choice. Fine car, fine engine- I just don't care for them together. At least not for that much money[|)]

              Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
              Parish, central NY 13131

              "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

              "It was the last chance for Studebaker to turn things around. The company was down to its last bullet, and this new small car was it. They called it the Lark"



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              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                More to the point: The salient feature of a 1956 Golden Hawk is the honkin' big Packard V-8. While the 454 Chevy now in it is probably just as big, the car has been neutered of its most distinquishing feature...hence the market is soft.
                I'd have to disagree with the statement that the 454 hinders the car's value.

                Certainly here with Studebaker folks on a Studebaker forum, most would want the car stock or near stock.

                However, when looking at the entire population of folks that might be interested in this car, the 454 would be a plus not a minus.

                The number of pure stock Studebaker advocates is pretty small...maybe 10,000 or so? The number of folks that enjoy modified cars in some way, shape, or form is many times this number. Shoot, there are well over 10,000 participants and spectators at one GoodGuys event.

                On this car in particular, there are maybe 100 people or so in the market for a stock '56 Golden Hawk. OTOH, there are thousands and thousands in the market for a tasty 50's hot rod.

                His pictures and presentation are poor. I don't think it's the 454 that is holding it back.



                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA



                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

                  quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                  More to the point: The salient feature of a 1956 Golden Hawk is the honkin' big Packard V-8. While the 454 Chevy now in it is probably just as big, the car has been neutered of its most distinquishing feature...hence the market is soft.
                  I'll respectfully disagree with the statement that the 454 hinders the car's value.

                  Certainly here with Studebaker folks on a Studebaker forum, most would want the car stock or near stock.

                  However, when looking at the entire population of folks that might be interested in this car, the 454 would be a plus not a minus.

                  The number of pure stock Studebaker advocates is pretty small...maybe 10,000 or so? The number of folks that enjoy modified cars in some way, shape, or form is many times this number. Shoot, there are well over 10,000 participants and spectators at one GoodGuys event.

                  On this car in particular, there are maybe 100 people or so in the market for a stock '56 Golden Hawk. OTOH, there are thousands and thousands in the market for a tasty 50's hot rod.

                  His pictures and presentation are poor. I don't think it's the 454 that is holding it back.



                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA



                  [}] I'll respectfully disagree, Dick, but not as a Studebaker fan...or for the reason you cite. Note my example of the 1957 fuelie Chevy with the 350 Olds; that's the point I'm making.

                  Consider: The 350 Olds, assuming it was installed nicely and all details accounted for, would probably make that fuelie '57 Chevy more tractable, more dependable, and even more driveable and usable than the original fuelie motor...but the 350 Olds would still detract from the car's highest value in the marketplace.

                  I guess the best way to understand my opinion is to ignore the fact that the car in question is a 1956 Studebaker, and that I am primarily a Studebaker fan. If that example fuelie Chevy was a real car and we were discussing it, my opinion would be the same; it has nothing to do with the fact that the car is a Studebaker.

                  To the contrary, it has everything to do with the fact that the Golden Hawk's (or the fuelie Chevy's) most interesting, and value-determining, factor has been removed.

                  To frame it in terms closer to the discussion that goes on here at least once a month: What I said about the Golden Hawk and the fuelie Chevy's market would not (repeat, [u]not</u>) be my opinion if we were discussing a nice '53 Starliner with a SBC powering it.

                  In that case, you and I would be in agreement: Someone having removed the original 232 didn't particularily impact the Starliner's value one way or another; in fact, if the SBC conversion was done nicely, the car might even have a wider market and bring more money than if the 232 had been left in it.

                  Not so this Golden Hawk or the fictitious fuelie '57 Chevy with a 350 Olds, though; the overall value of those cars is more determined by their original engine than is a Starliner with a garden-variety 232...or a '57 Chevy 150 with a base 265 and Powerglide. The 232 or 265 are yawn motors, but the Packard V-8 and fuelie motors are distinquishing characteristics of the two cars in the o
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                    More to the point: The salient feature of a 1956 Golden Hawk is the honkin' big Packard V-8. While the 454 Chevy now in it is probably just as big, the car has been neutered of its most distinquishing feature...hence the market is soft.

                    Who wants a documented 1957 factory fuel-injected 1957 Chevrolet 150 if it is now powered by an Olds 350 V-8, no matter how nicely done is the conversion? (Yes, I know; somebody would buy the factory fuelie Chevy to build a clone with a 1957 fuelie block, but the market isn't that strong for 1956 Golden Hawks, to "reconvert" them to Packard V-8s.) BP
                    Well, since the Olds motor is the better of the two, and an Olds 455 is the same block...

                    nate

                    (I do see your point though)

                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                    • #11
                      Personal opinions of engine swaps aside, tbe bottom line, the only reason any given car doesn't sell is the asking price is too high and/or it is not offered to the national market. That this '56J has been advertised nationally and offered widely on several fora for many months without a sale, Q.E.D.

                      Keep an overpriced car long enough and inflation will erode the high price as well as changing tastes might eventually find the ONE buyer who will pay the too-high price. However, as an investment strategy, it doesn't rank highly.

                      thnx, jack vines


                      PackardV8
                      PackardV8

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                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                        Personal opinions of engine swaps aside, tbe bottom line, the only reason any given car doesn't sell is the asking price is too high and/or it is not offered to the national market.
                        In this case, I'd also put some blame on the presentation. A few thumbnail sized photos and essentially no description generally doesn't make enough people knowledgeable enough about the car or comfortable enough to bid.

                        Dick Steinkamp
                        Bellingham, WA



                        Dick Steinkamp
                        Bellingham, WA

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                        • #13
                          On the face of it, it appears to be a decent-looking street rod. But, I've got a hunchh that on this particular Hawk that if the owner did not consider the consequences of installing a 454 in place of the Packard in this truly significant collector car, that they also took some other liberties with the project. One of the photos does show an inexpensive aftermarket steering wheel & not an original. Fixing an original cracked wheel, replating the horn ring and finding a nice horn button requires some effort and persistence & money. There just may be some other things that don't show up in the photos. Maybe this car was a rough barn car that many restorers already passed over. I'm fine with well-engineered engine swaps that actually improve and upgrade the car, but otoh common sense says don't re-engineer a GH; build it with an authentic restoration or sell it to someone who will. I know someone who is naive and hard headed that recently acquired a slick 65 Riviera with a locked-up 425. Since they can't find a 425 by calling around to the local salvage yards, the Guy(a welder and a trucker and a cowboy by trade) is planning to install any good running GM carbureted V8 engine he can find available for a cheap price, and there is no talking him out of it...

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                          • #14
                            How's this for another thought at why this car isn't selling:

                            1. It's too stock-appearing for the big-buck street rod crowd. No gentleman's chop, no flames, no monochome, no Fatman, no four-link; in short, no buzz words.
                            2. It's got a Chevy in it, so it's too modified to appeal to the restoration and/or the SDC 400-point folks.

                            thnx, jack vines

                            PackardV8
                            PackardV8

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                            • #15
                              I went up and looked at the car when it was in Leesburg. From what I can recall, the engine install was done pretty well, but there was something about the interior that turned me off.
                              All the body work looked fine, but that was few years ago...
                              At that time, the seller wanted $16,500 for it..

                              Bob Johnstone

                              http://www.studebaker-info.org
                              55 President State Sedan
                              64 GT Hawk
                              70 Avanti (R3)
                              64 GT Hawk (K7)
                              1970 Avanti (R3)

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