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International Harvester Studebaker?

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  • 53k
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by S2DSteve

    At a show today a fellow explained to me he had a rare '53 International Harvester Studebaker truck "from that time when IH and Studebaker were connected". I told him (honestly) that I hadn't heard about that. Usually these things have some basis in fact, but I can't imagine where this one originated. Anyone have a clue?
    When I bought my '60 one-ton 4WD from the original dealer owner, it had an International bed on it. Of course that was because the owner, with Yankee frugality, ordered it as a cab and chassis, built his own tool box which was behind the cab, then put on a six-foot IH bed to mount his wrecker crane (actually, other than being rusty everywhere, it didn't look that bad).


    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/Copy%20of%20Copy%20of%20nameplates%207-6-08%20162.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/Copy%20of%20Copy%20of%20nameplates%207-6-08%20168.jpg[/img=right]

    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine
    1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
    1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

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  • jnewkirk77
    replied
    IH was one of the companies that Nance & Co. went to, I believe the term is "hat in hand," looking for help (in the form of a merger) in the dark days of 1956. I don't know if there's much in the way of details out there, but supposedly Nance said that International would not have added much to S-P's strength, as they were no more of a presence in the big cities than S-P was.

    I did read something interesting on Time Magazine's website tonight; supposedly there was a merger proposed with Oliver Implement in 1959 ... what happened there? Anyone???

    Jacob Newkirk - Owensboro, KY

    KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL! Drive a Studebaker!

    Leave a comment:


  • bondobilly
    replied
    For 23 years I have been having a "friendly" arguement with my next door neighbor. He insists that the engines that Studebaker used were IH's.

    It started when I got my 47 coupe and continues till this day. Nothing I can say, or show him in print will make hime believe otherwise.

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  • RebelStude
    replied
    Come to think of it,the gas cap rubber "blank" used on the Stude 4x4 trucks is an exact match for the one IH used, as is the elbow for the truck gas tanks. Also, the cab grab handles (while I am sure Stude didn't make 'em themselves) have a close resemblence.

    George

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by arkiejazz

    [)]Apparently, Studebaker made a play toward buying Binder cabs before they finally settled on the Champ idea. One little known tidbit is that IH actually did a good deal of casting work for several other mfgrs. And the reason that the AMC 401 V8 and the Chrysler 727 automatic transmission were offered in later IH offerings was that IH did all the casting work for those Chrysler/AMC/Jeep items. Chrysler paid IH off in engines and transmissions.[)]
    I know some of the heavy-duty Intersmashables used AMC hardware such as door handles and dashboard switches on them. (Medium-duty S-series appeared to have their own hardware.) Later, in 1982/3, International was seriously considering getting back into the light truck market with the success Ford was having with their diesel engines.

    Craig

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  • ddub
    replied
    Let's think about this. IH products known as "Corn Binderes" and '50 and '51 Stude products some times known as "two-row corn pickers". There may be a connection after all.

    Don Wilson
    53 Commander Hardtop
    64 Champ 1/2 ton
    Centralia, WA

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  • arkiejazz
    replied
    [)]Apparently, Studebaker made a play toward buying Binder cabs before they finally settled on the Champ idea. IH products are referred to affectionately among afficianados as "Binders" due to the company actually being more well known at one time for building quality Combines and other "reaper" type ag vehicles. One little known tidbit is that IH actually did a good deal of casting work for several other mfgrs. And the reason that the AMC 401 V8 and the Chrysler 727 automatic transmission were offered in later IH offerings was that IH did all the casting work for those Chrysler/AMC/Jeep items. Chrysler paid IH off in engines and transmissions.[)]

    steve blake...roaming the Texas Panhandle in my trusty Champ pickup
    http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt

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  • HookedonStudies
    replied
    Short for "Corn Binder" coming from the Ag side of International Harvester.



    55 Commander
    58 Transtar
    62 GT Hawk
    66 Cruiser

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  • showbizkid
    replied
    I've never heard the nickname "Binder" before... what's the story?


    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 F2/Lark Standard
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
    www.studebakersandiego.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Guido
    replied
    Having just sold a '59 IH B-120 4x4 two weeks ago, the truck was far ahead of Studebaker in many ways. IH offered a variety of engine options with OHV construction (though it seems few were equipped with the 266 V-8) as well as suspended pedals, etc. Binders were known for being tough, I still have 2 later models in my "fleet".

    Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

    See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

    Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

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  • grobb284
    replied
    There may be a connection, but not direct.

    Raymond Loewy did work for IH, even including designing their logo.
    There were some proposals for some trucks for IH, don't know if they were adopted.

    A friend has a 1948 IH truck, look like it has a Cadillac front end, a very nice design.


    1963 Studebaker Avanti: C4 Corvette narrowed front/rear suspension, C5 13" calipers/rotors adapted to C4, Viper differential with Intrax 3.54 ratio (the snake has been charmed!), coil overs, stainless tubular frame, stainless chambered side exhaust.
    Here are two links for some pictures and information.
    Slide Show
    Magazine Article

    Leave a comment:


  • RebelStude
    replied
    I've seen a 60's vintage Binder PU with a Stude 259 V8 & auto transmission in it. And, there's a Champ PU at Turner's in Fresno CA with a IH stepside bed on it (it actually looks pretty good).

    George

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I can't see what Studebaker ever could have given IH other than (eventually) the Transtar model name. Heck, smaller IH trucks and SUVs STILL have a great reputation and at that, they simply walked away from producing them. So did Jeep.
    Think about the reputation Jeep had after WWII and still has today. You'd think with the badge of utility king that they've owned for half a century, they'd still be building "light" trucks.
    Maybe this should be on the Huggers porum, but here's a question for ya.... What'll become of the Jeep brand if Chrysler (actually, WHEN) buys the farm??? I'm betting it'll move to China or India.[B)]

    Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President two door

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    "And they also took the 1964-5 full wheel covers and removed the stamped Lazy-S in the center and used them on Travelalls, etc."

    Yes - that as well as removing the "rays" eventually and even the whole center of the de-rayed cove as well! (to let the locking hubs fit thru!


    Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President two door

    Leave a comment:


  • 556063
    replied
    Heard stories about talks between Studebaker and IH. Both companies were "outsiders" to the Detroit power structure, each being headquartered a few hundred miles away in South Bend and Chicago. But the two never got real close as far as I know. International Harvester was a huge industrial conglomerate, with divisions in agriculture, construction equipment, trucks etc. But they didn't have a passenger car product line. Studebaker's primary business was passenger cars. If you think about it that way, you could see why they might talk. But I think all they did was talk.

    Kevin Wolford
    Plymouth, IN

    55 Champion
    60 Lark VI Conv.
    63 Avanti R1

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