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  • #31
    Guess we'll have to agree or disagree on this one. Sandblasting, like anything else, can be done right or wrong or in-between. The show-quality body/paint guy who does my work much prefers to work on a carefully sandblasted car. I've sandblasted several Studes with no problems whatsoever. However, I do take the body off the frame. Trying to work around the dash, running gear and other parts will cause more problems in the end.

    thnx, jack vines


    PackardV8
    PackardV8

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    • #32
      quote:Originally posted by torker
      I'm sorry, but I can't wait to show a car next to one that you boys have had sandblasted...The process is okay for prepping frames and other underbody parts.....but entirely unsuitable for exterior sheetmetal.
      Feel free to put yours next to any of these....for "body-fit"... and other "problems" that sandblasting will (or rather...could possibly) cause. And NO- they have NOT had any bodywork to the seams to get them to "fit"... they are as original.











      I can only think of one reason for you to be so adamant against sandblasting ... you/someone you know had someone NOT familiar or experienced- blast a car and ruin it. I have blasted at least 15 myself, and have a local guy now that has done about 10 others. The only car we ever had any warpage from was a 1969 Chevy El Camino with an aftermarket quarter panel (tin-foil).

      For me... the ONLY downside of blasting the main body shell of a Stude - is getting ALL the sand out. It is almost a necessity to have a rotisserie and keep spinning the darn thing while you go over and over it. The body panels themselves are a piece of cake.



      Ray


      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
      Ray

      www.raylinrestoration.com
      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

      Comment


      • #33
        quote:Originally posted by torker
        I'm sorry, but I can't wait to show a car next to one that you boys have had sandblasted...The process is okay for prepping frames and other underbody parts.....but entirely unsuitable for exterior sheetmetal.
        Feel free to put yours next to any of these....for "body-fit"... and other "problems" that sandblasting will (or rather...could possibly) cause. And NO- they have NOT had any bodywork to the seams to get them to "fit"... they are as original.











        I can only think of one reason for you to be so adamant against sandblasting ... you/someone you know had someone NOT familiar or experienced- blast a car and ruin it. I have blasted at least 15 myself, and have a local guy now that has done about 10 others. The only car we ever had any warpage from was a 1969 Chevy El Camino with an aftermarket quarter panel (tin-foil).

        For me... the ONLY downside of blasting the main body shell of a Stude - is getting ALL the sand out. It is almost a necessity to have a rotisserie and keep spinning the darn thing while you go over and over it. The body panels themselves are a piece of cake.



        Ray


        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
        Ray

        www.raylinrestoration.com
        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

        Comment


        • #34
          Thanks again for all the input. I am ready to lift the motor out with everything unhooked and the lift sitting in front of the car.BUT,the bolts that hold the exhaust pipe on are not cooperating. I put penetrating oil on them several times this evening but cannot turn them. Sure do not want to twist them off and have that to deal with. I may try heating the area-hope that works.

          Not sure where to attach the chains to lift the motor out. Thinking maybe a heavy duty tow strap under the whole thing?????

          Jimmie

          1950 2 timer
          Orleans, Indiana
          sigpicJimmie
          Orange County, Indiana
          1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

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          • #35
            I have had no problem sandblasting body panels. To do it safely, get no closer than 10-12 feet from the panel being sandblasted. Sandblast in a circular/swirl motion, and allow the rust to lift off with several passes to eliminate the buildup of heat. NEVER stop or pause on the panel; ALWAYS go off the edge when resting or to regain your grip on the nozzle. Here is a trunklid I sandblasted.



            Before.



            After sandblasting.



            Primered.

            Craig

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            • #36
              I have had no problem sandblasting body panels. To do it safely, get no closer than 10-12 feet from the panel being sandblasted. Sandblast in a circular/swirl motion, and allow the rust to lift off with several passes to eliminate the buildup of heat. NEVER stop or pause on the panel; ALWAYS go off the edge when resting or to regain your grip on the nozzle. Here is a trunklid I sandblasted.



              Before.



              After sandblasting.



              Primered.

              Craig

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              • #37
                10 to 12 feet, That's one hell of a sand blaster.

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                • #38
                  Yes--I'll allow you to sandblast your fenders, doors, quarters roof and hood, etc. Provided that is, you do NOT get within 100 feet of your body panels with a sandblaster nozzle....I've seen all kinds of short cuts used to fix up things. But, just because it is the expedient for a sizable minority,and they swear by it, still doesn't make it the Right Way.[8]Another thing is--I find the emotional, defensive nature of the responses to my opinion on this subject, (that are based upon My own experiences) are not what you would expect from individuals that would possess the temperament(i.e. patience)to thoroughly restore an old car. Not a hobby for someone who wants instant gratification. That said, I hope I never have to serve as a points judge at a meet, because I'm concerned about how certain excitable types might react if they did not win a trophy, or I deducted a point for something or another. Again: if you are a risk-taker, and like to spend hours and hours and hours cleaning up sand, go ahead and sandblast. It's your car, but it is not the way I'da done it.......

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                  • #39
                    quote:Originally posted by sweetolbob

                    10 to 12 feet, That's one hell of a sand blaster.
                    Indeed, it is! There is an excellent DIY sandblasting facility here that has five outdoor workstations. (Consolidated Compressor, they don't have a website). I've done LOTS of sandblating there including Big Bertha's frame.

                    Craig

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                    • #40
                      OK...
                      If it's not the "RIGHT" way... there is only one other choice... and you're calling us all WRONG.
                      Sorry pal... but you need to get over yourself...
                      Sandblasting is NOT a "shortcut". It is a well accepted means of removing paint and rust from metal surfaces.
                      YOU on the other hand- have offered NO alternative suggestions at all (and I re-read ALL your posts). If you can't contribute anything positive- why are you posting here?
                      You have chastised us as being lazy(expedient) and That YOUR work is so much better (your claim to put yours up against any sandblasted car for comparison)..
                      Well, I have NINE 1st place SDC IM meet winners... I have a '64 Avanti that was media-blasted and had 0 points deducted for body/paint at the IM in 1994 (394/400) Deductions were for an original un-restored interior, a faded original fuel gauge, and one chrome piece in the engine compartment. I have a sandblasted '61 that also scored 394/400. I still cannot figure out what the 1-point deduction for the rear bumper filler-panel was??? But otherwise- no body/paint fit/finish deductions.
                      Gee... these cars would have scored sooooo much better if I had used YOUR method huh??? Oh wait... you haven't told us what that method is... Do you have tiny-trolls with little sanders strip the car for you? Paint/Rust eating bacteria? Voo-Doo??? What is this magic method of which we lazy drones cannot fathom?

                      Ray <-- apparently been doing it wrong for 26 years.



                      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                      Ray

                      www.raylinrestoration.com
                      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        OK...
                        If it's not the "RIGHT" way... there is only one other choice... and you're calling us all WRONG.
                        Sorry pal... but you need to get over yourself...
                        Sandblasting is NOT a "shortcut". It is a well accepted means of removing paint and rust from metal surfaces.
                        YOU on the other hand- have offered NO alternative suggestions at all (and I re-read ALL your posts). If you can't contribute anything positive- why are you posting here?
                        You have chastised us as being lazy(expedient) and That YOUR work is so much better (your claim to put yours up against any sandblasted car for comparison)..
                        Well, I have NINE 1st place SDC IM meet winners... I have a '64 Avanti that was media-blasted and had 0 points deducted for body/paint at the IM in 1994 (394/400) Deductions were for an original un-restored interior, a faded original fuel gauge, and one chrome piece in the engine compartment. I have a sandblasted '61 that also scored 394/400. I still cannot figure out what the 1-point deduction for the rear bumper filler-panel was??? But otherwise- no body/paint fit/finish deductions.
                        Gee... these cars would have scored sooooo much better if I had used YOUR method huh??? Oh wait... you haven't told us what that method is... Do you have tiny-trolls with little sanders strip the car for you? Paint/Rust eating bacteria? Voo-Doo??? What is this magic method of which we lazy drones cannot fathom?

                        Ray <-- apparently been doing it wrong for 26 years.



                        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                        Ray

                        www.raylinrestoration.com
                        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Excellent comments, Dave & Ray. Sandblasting sheetmetal is effective but is not for the untrained worker, even if he has been sandblasting iron for 30 years. Done carefully, it is the best way to remove old paint and oxidation. I stand back from the work enough to make about a 12" swath, so I can use about 125# pressure w/o harming the metal. I hold the nozzle at an angle to the work and sweep it fast to avoid building damaging heat, only taking about a third at a time, returning for additional passes until the piece is clean. Avoid blasting the back sides of panels which have inner panels to obstruct the sand or you will risk damage. I have a body shell to blast next week, now that it is good & hot.
                          As Ray says, the big draw back is all of the time it takes to remove all of the media after blasting since there just aint no easy way to remove it all.
                          I usually spray epoxy right on to the freshly cleaned surface w/o phosphatizing, though sometimes use the self-etching primer instead.
                          In my misearbly humid climate, though, the work can turn brown before all of the sand can be removed, necessitating the use of phosphate.

                          Barry'd in Studes
                          Barry'd in Studes

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                          • #43
                            Well folks, I brought home my fenders, hood, trunk lid, doors,wheels and almost everything else and it all looks great. The fellow who did the work put a "wash" on everything as he finished it and it is now ready for the primer. After reading the cautions about warping, we looked things over together and I couldn't find anything that appeared to have a problem.

                            I did remove the motor and transmission tonight and plan to clean off the grease and oil in the front end area before taking the "body" or whatever the rest is called to be "blasted." I plan to have the underside and frame done the same way, with the wash but not sure what I will put on it-any suggestions that will not cost a bunch. I have plans for attemting to keep the dust from getting under the dash. If it works I will pass it on, if not, I'll not say a word! The fellow doing the work has made it clear that there will be lots of dust to remove when he finishes.

                            I took the radiator to a shop today to have it made ready. It didn't leak the last time I drove it but just thought with all the money I am spending on everything else, I should have it up to par too. The radiator fellow was real impressed with it. He said that it had "tubes" and this was better than something else. He said that a 56 Chevy radiator he just got in wasn't made as good at mine, made in 50.

                            It cost me $400 to get the fuel tank redone inside and out with a warranty. They wanted lots of money for the new sending unit to go in the tank so I am hoping to use the original. I have tried to test it with an ohm meter but it doesn't give me a reading when I move it. Everything seems to be right about it but something is obviously wrong-any ideas?



                            1950 2 timer
                            Orleans, Indiana
                            sigpicJimmie
                            Orange County, Indiana
                            1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

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