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  • Sandblasting

    Well, it has been a while since I have checked in. I have been busy with family, remodeling, garden, church, etc. Well, I finally got to go to the shop and spend some time with my 50. Of course, now I have more questions for those who have been redoing Studebakers for awhile.

    I have taken everything that I could get loose from my 1950 Champion to be sandblasted. Doors, hood, trunk lid, 4 fenders, grill, wheels and everything else that would come off. Now, I am considering taking the body to have it blasted from frame to the top of the top. I have some concerns:
    1. Do I need to somehow protect the back side of the instrument panel?
    2. What about the rear spring assembly, should I wrap the springs in something.
    3. I plan to wrap the motor in plastic and tape it up real good but am still concerned about sand getting into it-any suggestions.
    4. I plan to have everything sandblasted regarding the steering and everything in that area but am concerned about sand getting into the wheel bearings. All the brake cylinders etc. are off the car and I plan to stop up holes that exist but am wondering if I should remove the drums and clean the bearings and clean and apply new grease before loading it back on the trailer to take it back to the shop where I will be installing the new brake hardware etc and cleaning the bearings etc.
    5. What is the trim called, I know it is not chrome but cannot remember what it is called and can it be brought back to life with any kind of rubbing compound or will that just dull it more.

    Thanks for your help,

    Jimmie

    1950 2 timer
    Orleans, Indiana
    sigpicJimmie
    Orange County, Indiana
    1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

  • #2
    I sure would not recommend having exterior body sheetmetal sandblasted--it will warp it and blow holes through any thin areas. Now, there are other media that can be used to prep fenders hoods, etc. There is soda blasting, plastic beading and walnut hulls and others. Still, it requires care and experience to accomplish it successfully. Bear in mind that anytime you perform this on a large assembly like a frame or car body, that it will take "forever" to get all of the media out.

    Comment


    • #3
      I sure would not recommend having exterior body sheetmetal sandblasted--it will warp it and blow holes through any thin areas. Now, there are other media that can be used to prep fenders hoods, etc. There is soda blasting, plastic beading and walnut hulls and others. Still, it requires care and experience to accomplish it successfully. Bear in mind that anytime you perform this on a large assembly like a frame or car body, that it will take "forever" to get all of the media out.

      Comment


      • #4
        Jimmie; I never heard of ANYONE ever, sending a complete engine to a sandblaster! [:0] That is a BIG NO, NO! I don't believe there is any way to keep the media completely out of the inside.

        StudeRich
        Studebakers Northwest
        Ferndale, WA
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Jimmie; I never heard of ANYONE ever, sending a complete engine to a sandblaster! [:0] That is a BIG NO, NO! I don't believe there is any way to keep the media completely out of the inside.

          StudeRich
          Studebakers Northwest
          Ferndale, WA
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            I think you should possibly forget about sand blasting the car. [Does it really need it?] As a rule, you would never send mechanical pieces to a sandblaster for fear of getting the sand in places where it is just not welcome. Piece by piece is how I would do it. It sounds to me from reading your question that you may possibly be inexperienced in the restoration process. A bit confused as to what you want to do. What are yout expectations? More than likely, you could buy a car in better condition cheaper than restoring one. This is no secret. Post some detailed photos so people can see the car. You will be advised. Have someone that is [knowledgeable] lay out a step by step course of action that will lead to your expectations. A lot of time consuming work is possibly going to be required of you unless you have deep pockets. THERE AIN'T NO SHORT CUTS but there are things that may not have to be taken care of before you have a driver. Dont set a deadline as it may only serve to frustrate you. Any project undertaken by an individual must be worth doing so do it right the first time. Take your time and do it right. Lots of tools out there to make your job easier Let us see the photos jimmijim
            sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

            Comment


            • #7
              I think you should possibly forget about sand blasting the car. [Does it really need it?] As a rule, you would never send mechanical pieces to a sandblaster for fear of getting the sand in places where it is just not welcome. Piece by piece is how I would do it. It sounds to me from reading your question that you may possibly be inexperienced in the restoration process. A bit confused as to what you want to do. What are yout expectations? More than likely, you could buy a car in better condition cheaper than restoring one. This is no secret. Post some detailed photos so people can see the car. You will be advised. Have someone that is [knowledgeable] lay out a step by step course of action that will lead to your expectations. A lot of time consuming work is possibly going to be required of you unless you have deep pockets. THERE AIN'T NO SHORT CUTS but there are things that may not have to be taken care of before you have a driver. Dont set a deadline as it may only serve to frustrate you. Any project undertaken by an individual must be worth doing so do it right the first time. Take your time and do it right. Lots of tools out there to make your job easier Let us see the photos jimmijim
              sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for your input. He does use other types of media and has quite a bit of experience preparing auto bodies.

                Thanks again,
                Jimmie

                1950 2 timer
                Orleans, Indiana
                sigpicJimmie
                Orange County, Indiana
                1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for your input. He does use other types of media and has quite a bit of experience preparing auto bodies.

                  Thanks again,
                  Jimmie

                  1950 2 timer
                  Orleans, Indiana
                  sigpicJimmie
                  Orange County, Indiana
                  1950 CHAMPION -ORANGE COUNTY, INDIANA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The trim of which you speak is called stainless and can be restored with a buffer and compounds available from places like Eastwood.It takes practice and patience and it is easy to ruin it if not careful. Its best to practice on a scrap pieces, or alternatively if you can't acquire the skills send it to a professional. Do a search here on stainless restoration. This has been covered before.In order to do a thorough job of sandblasting the car should be completely disassembled, body off frame, no engine or dash, springs etc. You will never get a complete job otherwise.
                    Frank van Doorn
                    Omaha, Ne.
                    1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                    1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                    1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The trim of which you speak is called stainless and can be restored with a buffer and compounds available from places like Eastwood.It takes practice and patience and it is easy to ruin it if not careful. Its best to practice on a scrap pieces, or alternatively if you can't acquire the skills send it to a professional. Do a search here on stainless restoration. This has been covered before.In order to do a thorough job of sandblasting the car should be completely disassembled, body off frame, no engine or dash, springs etc. You will never get a complete job otherwise.
                      Frank van Doorn
                      Omaha, Ne.
                      1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                      1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                      1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Torker wrote: "I sure would not recommend having exterior body sheetmetal sandblasted--it will warp it and blow holes through any thin areas."

                        There is not a single restoration/rebuild I have done without sandblasting the entire exterior body. The key is to have a blaster familiar with blasting older car bodies. Mine avoids blasting large flat areas such as the middle section of the roofs and hoods. This can easily be stripped chemically, or with a sander. The edges are fine- as any roll, or body line increases the strength in that area, so warping is not an issue.

                        DO NOT send it with the engine/trans installed. Remove it- should be easy without the front sheet metal.
                        The rear axle is OK- but will need disassembled and cleaned out after it is returned to you. OR, have him avoid the backing plate areas. There is a tiny vent hole on the left axle tube that must be avoided also.
                        The rear spring-packs need to be wrapped in duct-tape.
                        Remove the FRONT DRUMS during blasting. Duct-tape the spindles. If you can't, just remove the wheel bearings and seals afterwards and clean them or install new ... the rears are OK.
                        I would remove the guages and other dash parts B4 blasting. But if you must leave them, duct-tape/heavy plastic the fronts and backside as much as possible.
                        Duct-tape the serial plate TWICE.
                        After blasting, POR-15 the entire undercarriage and prime it IMMEDIATELY with Epoxy Primer, if you plan on it being painted later. Same goes for the frame.

                        Ray



                        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                        Ray

                        www.raylinrestoration.com
                        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Torker wrote: "I sure would not recommend having exterior body sheetmetal sandblasted--it will warp it and blow holes through any thin areas."

                          There is not a single restoration/rebuild I have done without sandblasting the entire exterior body. The key is to have a blaster familiar with blasting older car bodies. Mine avoids blasting large flat areas such as the middle section of the roofs and hoods. This can easily be stripped chemically, or with a sander. The edges are fine- as any roll, or body line increases the strength in that area, so warping is not an issue.

                          DO NOT send it with the engine/trans installed. Remove it- should be easy without the front sheet metal.
                          The rear axle is OK- but will need disassembled and cleaned out after it is returned to you. OR, have him avoid the backing plate areas. There is a tiny vent hole on the left axle tube that must be avoided also.
                          The rear spring-packs need to be wrapped in duct-tape.
                          Remove the FRONT DRUMS during blasting. Duct-tape the spindles. If you can't, just remove the wheel bearings and seals afterwards and clean them or install new ... the rears are OK.
                          I would remove the guages and other dash parts B4 blasting. But if you must leave them, duct-tape/heavy plastic the fronts and backside as much as possible.
                          Duct-tape the serial plate TWICE.
                          After blasting, POR-15 the entire undercarriage and prime it IMMEDIATELY with Epoxy Primer, if you plan on it being painted later. Same goes for the frame.

                          Ray



                          Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                          Ray

                          www.raylinrestoration.com
                          Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've refurbished a number of cars over the years, from 1972 Broncos, to 39 ford coupes to healey's and triumphs to the 54 stude. I've sand blasted everyone using a variety of compressors and an 80# pressure blaster. The latest compressor is an Ingersoll-Rand eleven hp unit. I've never had an experience with a warped panel. I use a reasonable shallow angle and don't stay in one place too long. I tried dipping once, years ago, and then hand solvent stripping once. Both rebuilds were a mess of leaking crud from the joints and hidden areas. There is no question commercial blasters can make spaghetti out of a panel but they commonly handle heavy material. I highly recommend blasting at home from both a cost and quality standpoint. Remember!!! full blasting mask and breathing protection.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've refurbished a number of cars over the years, from 1972 Broncos, to 39 ford coupes to healey's and triumphs to the 54 stude. I've sand blasted everyone using a variety of compressors and an 80# pressure blaster. The latest compressor is an Ingersoll-Rand eleven hp unit. I've never had an experience with a warped panel. I use a reasonable shallow angle and don't stay in one place too long. I tried dipping once, years ago, and then hand solvent stripping once. Both rebuilds were a mess of leaking crud from the joints and hidden areas. There is no question commercial blasters can make spaghetti out of a panel but they commonly handle heavy material. I highly recommend blasting at home from both a cost and quality standpoint. Remember!!! full blasting mask and breathing protection.

                              Comment

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