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  • Waterman Aerobile-it's a car, it's a plane

    Studebaker engine.


    I thought there was a topic posted about this several years ago but the "SEARCH" produced no results.

    Didn't Bob Cummings drive one of these in his TV show of the fifties?

    http://aerofiles.com/waterman.html

    Brad Johnson
    Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
    '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight
    "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

    Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
    Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
    sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

  • #2
    Here's some info from another Stude forum...
    (copy)
    Studebaker's 5 Arrobiles: Where Re They Now???
    (Forwarded by Jeff Rice with one BIG question 2/20/2007)
    http://cutandpasteaviation.blogspot....light-220.html
    (Note: Timeline snipped for brevity)
    1937 - The first successful automobile-airplane combination was complete and ready for testing.
    The first flight took place the next day, February 21, 1937. Built by the Westerman Arrowplane Corporation of Santa Monica, Cal., the vehicle was dubbed the Arrowbile, and claimed a top air-speed of 120 mph and 70 mph on a highway. Designed by aeroengineer Waldo Dean Waterman (1894-1976), it evolved from the prototype Arrowplane, a project to design a simple, easy to fly, low cost airplane. Stall- and spin-proof, its simplicity of operation was underscored when DoC's John Geisse, with only 35 hours' flight experience, flew one back to Washington DC in his business suit. The Studebaker Corporation, which supplied the 100 hp engines, eventually took delivery of five Arrowbiles. The Arrowbile was revived briefly in 1958 as Aerobile with a Tucker auto engine (Franklin converted to liquid-cooled).

    And some further reading....

    http://www.aviation-history.com/garb...obile-1_f.html

    http://www.roadabletimes.com/roadabl...atr_halok.html

    http://aerofiles.com/waterman.html


    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      One on display at the Smithsonian Udvar-Hazy Center
      Boeing Aviation Hangar.
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

      Comment


      • #4
        Someone should fly one to a Stude meet.

        Chris Pile
        Midway Chapter SDC
        The Studebaker Special
        The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

        Comment


        • #5
          Is that a plane from Flight Simulator or did you create it.?

          Comment


          • #6
            What Studebaker engine did they use? I would have thought that any Studebaker engine in the '30's that produced 100 horsepower would have been incredibly heavy for this application.

            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Editor of "The Down Easterner"
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter
            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter

            Comment


            • #7





              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

              Comment


              • #8
                And playing the part of Leonard tonight is Dick Steinkamp!!!!



                [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                Clark in San Diego
                '63 F2/Lark Standard
                http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
                www.studebakersandiego.com

                Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

                  And playing the part of Leonard tonight is Dick Steinkamp!!!!
                  I figured there HAD to be one time in my life when I either had some Studebaker memorabilia that Leonard DIDN'T have (unlikely), OR that I was faster.


                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:
                    Didn't Bob Cummings drive one of these in his TV show of the fifties?
                    No, Bob Cummings drove a Taylor Aerocar. It's a bit more car-like with a detachable rear fuselage (and wings) with a pusher prop in back of the tail.

                    There's one for sale in Trade-a-Plane (the airplane version of Hemmings) for $3.5 million.
                    Looks like Bob should have kept his...

                    63 Avanti R1 2788
                    1914 Stutz Bearcat
                    (George Barris replica)

                    Washington State
                    63 Avanti R1 2788
                    1914 Stutz Bearcat
                    (George Barris replica)

                    Washington State

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:I figured there HAD to be one time in my life when I either had some Studebaker memorabilia that Leonard DIDN'T have (unlikely), OR that I was faster.

                      You got me on this one. I have never heard of this!

                      Leonard Shepherd
                      http://leonardshepherd.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by JRoberts

                        What Studebaker engine did they use? I would have thought that any Studebaker engine in the '30's that produced 100 horsepower would have been incredibly heavy for this application.
                        If I remember what Tom and Dave Shrock told me, as they make a model/toy of this plane, they used a Champion engine, but I believe they used a magneto rather than a distributor, that I could be mistaken on.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by bondobilly

                          If I remember what Tom and Dave Shrock told me, as they make a model/toy of this plane, they used a Champion engine, .

                          ...but, there wasn't a Champion engine in 1937.


                          Dick Steinkamp
                          Bellingham, WA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

                            quote:Originally posted by bondobilly

                            If I remember what Tom and Dave Shrock told me, as they make a model/toy of this plane, they used a Champion engine, .

                            ...but, there wasn't a Champion engine in 1937.
                            The ad twice shows and mentions employees working on a Dictator engine.

                            Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

                            See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

                            Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                            Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                            The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

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                            "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

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                            • #15



                              If y'all want the "rest of the story" you may wish to read the August 1988 TW Almanac and the March 1989 issue as well. In addition there will be a piece on it in the upcoming July TW.

                              Top photo Paul G. Hoffman (left) and Georger Keller. Bottom picture Waldo Waterman with his creation.

                              Richard Quinn
                              editor: Antique Studebaker Review
                              Richard Quinn
                              Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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