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Best way to cover a missing windshield?

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Heh - heh... I had one of those car covers that frequents ebay. You know - the one's that claim to fit various models of Studebakers?
    The Califgornia sun reduced it to superfine grey powder in about 6 months time!
    Dick probably found some of that powder when he was detailing the Daytona he got from me![xx(]

    Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President two door

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  • WCP
    replied
    You didn't indicate whether the project involves repainting the car. Don't ever put a plastic sheet or tarp directly on a painted surface that you want to protect. The combination of heat, moisture and chafing from the wind will destroy contact areas of the paint in a matter of a week or so. You can put a plastic cover over a soft cloth cover but lash it well to minimize wind flapping. Woven and coated plastic tarps are particularly abrasive if the woven side is down and it's not two-side coated.

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  • jimmijim8
    replied
    The best way would probably be to install a used windshield that might come with a reusable rubber gasket. I have a good friend who is like a jack of all trades------ McGuyver type of guy [actually a carpenter] and his suggestion is to attach a 4-12 pitch roof with at least a 1 1/2 foot overhang on the sides and eave ends. You might try to fasten it with bungee cords, duck tape, mighty putty, super glue. Magnets should work great too. Gutters and downspouts would be an option. I would recommend 30 year shingles. You might want to use this for your next project. If not you could always sell it on E-Bay listed as a "Windshield Eliminator" Chevy-Mopar-RatRod. jimmijim

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  • barnlark
    replied
    Too bad you aren't closer, I have a good used window with a still pliable rubber seal for that car you could have for free. You should be able to find one a lot closer for the freight costs, though. Lots of desert cars and parts out there. Until then, BP's info sounds perfect. Good luck with that Daytona.

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  • JRoberts
    replied
    Lots of good ideas. Here's one more that might be used alone or maybe even better in conjunction with some of the other suggestions. Go to Auto Zone, etc. and get a generic car cover. Measure your car and get one that is about the right size. I have gotten some good ones at Auto Zone that are breathable. Not what you would want for permanent covering but temporarily it might work.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    You could go to home depot or lowes & get a roll of "visqueen" (dont go by the spelling), a heavy plastic sheeting used in construction for temporary covering.

    60 Lark convertible
    61 Champ
    62 Daytona convertible
    63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
    63 Avanti (2)
    66 Daytona Sport Sedan

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  • bondobilly
    replied
    All kidding aside. take a few minutes to cut two or three pieces of lumber and prop up the roof line. In the event of a storm or some act of nature (unforseen) proping up the window frame will prevent any problems down the road.

    My ragtop came without a window and had I not put a set of props aup against the the upper part of the window frame there would have been damage after a huge rain storm hit a week after I got the car. One thing you do not want is a windshield opening that is not true. Search the Forum for threads on windshield rubber installation

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  • buddymander
    replied
    I would cut a piece of plywood that fits inside the upper part of the windshield opening and sticks out at the bottom. This would drain off moisture, for the most part, and would be heavy enough to stay in place and last for a while.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I was told by Rick Courtier that Rain-X worked real well[][}]
    Jeff[8D]


    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

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  • ct5philos
    replied
    Great ideas, guys. Thanks to all of you. I'll try a blue tarp while I'm looking for that specialized plastic with the sticky surface. That stuff sounds terrific!

    Carolyn

    1949 2R5 truck
    1962 GT Hawk
    1950 Champion Starlight (project)
    Santa Fe, NM

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  • 52-fan
    replied
    I was thinking it would be covered for a few months, but you never know.


    1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona.Searcy,Arkansas
    "I may be lazy, but I'm not shiftless."

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Carolyn: Larger commercial body shops and professional towing/recovery services now have a specialized heavy plastic with a sticky surface on one side that is used to cover open areas on late-model wrecks, so the interior is not damaged by water or anything while the car is being transported and stored before repair.

    You might check at a large commerical body shop/collision center, or at a big wrecker service, to see if you could buy enough of that material from one of their rolls, because your need is is exactly the intended use of that relatively-new product. BP

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  • 41 Frank
    replied
    If your only option other than covering the windshield opening with plastic is a tarp I would opt for the plastic, as covering a car with a tarp would have no provision for breathing out moisture and would invite mold inside the car. I saw a Stude once that had been covered with plastic for several years and mold ruined the interior.[V] This car was inside by the way. Putting a car cover on over the tarp as avantidon says would not help as the tarp would still trap the moisture under it.

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    If the windshield is "missing"...how do you cover it?

    Sorry...just in one of those moods!

    Mike

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by ct5philos

    A newbie question of sorts: what's the best (and thriftiest) way that you've found to cover a missing windshield?
    I would say if you have access to '61/'62 windshield that is already full of cracks would work for a car in storage. It will be a 'throw-away' item for someone who is replacing one for their driver Stude, and could probably be had for less that replacing a tarp 3 times a year as they are 'non- recyclable'. The plastic laminate in the middle would keep out any water, sand, etc, and naturally, it will fit.

    Craig

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