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stupid questions revisited

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  • bondobilly
    replied
    A bunch of years ago when Robin was attending religious education we pulled up in the 56J and a kid in his teens walked over and asked us........... "Is that the NEW Mercedes?".

    Try and explain why a Studebaker has a Packard engine.......see their faces go huh.

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  • bondobilly
    replied
    A bunch of years ago when Robin was attending religious education we pulled up in the 56J and a kid in his teens walked over and asked us........... "Is that the NEW Mercedes?".

    Try and explain why a Studebaker has a Packard engine.......see their faces go huh.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1961HAWK
    replied
    I made a recent mistake. A older gentleman past away and his grandkids called me to come b and tell them what his old studebakers were worth. he had 5. 3 were 65's 1 2 door 2 4 door . 1 62 hawk 1 63 wagonaire.
    all had sit outside for years. the 2 4 door i think will pull apart when they go to move them. i gave them the low down. and told the the 3 where chevy power. They said no those are studebaker 283's. i again told them no. they then said there grandpa would argue with me if he was there that they were studebaker 283's. i assured them they were not and where chevy 283's. i told them to call when they decided to move them out and i would be more than glad to help them find a home. they have never called. they run demolition cars. i bet they will have some 283 powered ones next year, because i havent heard a word.

    Erin Hays
    1961 Hawk
    1962 Lark
    1963 Wagonaire

    Leave a comment:


  • 1961HAWK
    replied
    I made a recent mistake. A older gentleman past away and his grandkids called me to come b and tell them what his old studebakers were worth. he had 5. 3 were 65's 1 2 door 2 4 door . 1 62 hawk 1 63 wagonaire.
    all had sit outside for years. the 2 4 door i think will pull apart when they go to move them. i gave them the low down. and told the the 3 where chevy power. They said no those are studebaker 283's. i again told them no. they then said there grandpa would argue with me if he was there that they were studebaker 283's. i assured them they were not and where chevy 283's. i told them to call when they decided to move them out and i would be more than glad to help them find a home. they have never called. they run demolition cars. i bet they will have some 283 powered ones next year, because i havent heard a word.

    Erin Hays
    1961 Hawk
    1962 Lark
    1963 Wagonaire

    Leave a comment:


  • sumf
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by CKOT

    what I can't understand is why some people come up to me when I am driving my Hawk, and try to tell me all about Studebakers (which is usually a mix of all the stuff emntioned above). I wouldn't dream of walking up to a Packard guy and start proclaiming all sorts of Packard info, I just don't get why anyone wouldn't think the driver would be knowledgeable of their own make of car.....


    Chris Kot
    '63 GT Hawk
    '37 Dictator Rod Project
    Lots of weird ideas about Packard, like that they had 12 cylinder engines and power brakes in the 1930s and Studebaker engines in the 1950s.

    Wonder why people come up with them?

    Karl

    Leave a comment:


  • sumf
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by CKOT

    what I can't understand is why some people come up to me when I am driving my Hawk, and try to tell me all about Studebakers (which is usually a mix of all the stuff emntioned above). I wouldn't dream of walking up to a Packard guy and start proclaiming all sorts of Packard info, I just don't get why anyone wouldn't think the driver would be knowledgeable of their own make of car.....


    Chris Kot
    '63 GT Hawk
    '37 Dictator Rod Project
    Lots of weird ideas about Packard, like that they had 12 cylinder engines and power brakes in the 1930s and Studebaker engines in the 1950s.

    Wonder why people come up with them?

    Karl

    Leave a comment:


  • sumf
    replied
    [quote]Originally posted by 55Studebaker



    I've also heard that a Lark was a Rambler and that a '50 Starlight coupe was a Ford


    Last week, I was asked if it was Rambler... but the next day, a guy hollered at me from another gas pump, "Is that a '64 or a '65 Stude - I can never tell the difference?"
    He drove off before we could have a chat, I'm sorry to say.

    Karl

    Leave a comment:


  • sumf
    replied
    [quote]Originally posted by 55Studebaker



    I've also heard that a Lark was a Rambler and that a '50 Starlight coupe was a Ford


    Last week, I was asked if it was Rambler... but the next day, a guy hollered at me from another gas pump, "Is that a '64 or a '65 Stude - I can never tell the difference?"
    He drove off before we could have a chat, I'm sorry to say.

    Karl

    Leave a comment:


  • 52hawk
    replied
    There's a Nauga farm near my house.really high security though,we call it Illinois' 'area 51'
    According to one 20 year old,my 61 Hawk is a Cadillac-[I know the fins may look caddy-ish,to some people]It was one of those days when I just didn't feel like saying 'Studebaker'in front of younguns..

    LaSalle,Il
    61Hawk

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  • 52hawk
    replied
    There's a Nauga farm near my house.really high security though,we call it Illinois' 'area 51'
    According to one 20 year old,my 61 Hawk is a Cadillac-[I know the fins may look caddy-ish,to some people]It was one of those days when I just didn't feel like saying 'Studebaker'in front of younguns..

    LaSalle,Il
    61Hawk

    Leave a comment:


  • John Kirchhoff
    replied
    Tom, I love the deal about the cows hanging upside down. However, I know for a fact it wasn't cows that Studebaker used, but actually it was possums. They'd corral them up and at night they'd naturally hang themelves by the tails and looked much like a bunch of hams being smoked. The mohair seat coverings was actually possum fur and the leather was known far and wide for the ability of old leather to look dead but be revived with just a touch of neatsfoot oil. The skin off of their tails was used for windlacing and if you look closely you can see the exterior is identical to all the modern immitations. Studebakers record auto production in the late '40s and early '50s severly depleted the supply of possums and that's actually what led to the demise of Studebaker. Management was old school and refused to consider using synthetic fabrics and they had great concern as to whether American farmers would take to raising Naugas for their hide. Cows and pigs yes, Naugas? Well they didn't know and that was their fatal mistake. Their only other option would have been to grow possums in factory farms but that was a new concept.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Kirchhoff
    replied
    Tom, I love the deal about the cows hanging upside down. However, I know for a fact it wasn't cows that Studebaker used, but actually it was possums. They'd corral them up and at night they'd naturally hang themelves by the tails and looked much like a bunch of hams being smoked. The mohair seat coverings was actually possum fur and the leather was known far and wide for the ability of old leather to look dead but be revived with just a touch of neatsfoot oil. The skin off of their tails was used for windlacing and if you look closely you can see the exterior is identical to all the modern immitations. Studebakers record auto production in the late '40s and early '50s severly depleted the supply of possums and that's actually what led to the demise of Studebaker. Management was old school and refused to consider using synthetic fabrics and they had great concern as to whether American farmers would take to raising Naugas for their hide. Cows and pigs yes, Naugas? Well they didn't know and that was their fatal mistake. Their only other option would have been to grow possums in factory farms but that was a new concept.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Some of those questions and statements are on the rather dull witted side to be kind. At least people are talking about these vehicles and not ignoring them completely. What would be worse to never hear another question or statement we can all laugh at later or to never hear another comment of any kind on your car? I know most own their vehicles because you like your own car or truck but you have to admit it's nice when someone pays attention you your hardwork and investment. The "nice car" or "nice truck" usually makes all the other comments worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Some of those questions and statements are on the rather dull witted side to be kind. At least people are talking about these vehicles and not ignoring them completely. What would be worse to never hear another question or statement we can all laugh at later or to never hear another comment of any kind on your car? I know most own their vehicles because you like your own car or truck but you have to admit it's nice when someone pays attention you your hardwork and investment. The "nice car" or "nice truck" usually makes all the other comments worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 53k
    replied
    We were sitting in our Brand O beside Bob Johnstone's '70 Avanti one day near Lancaster, PA. A young couple walked around it several times. She asked "what is it?" His answer- "must be some kind of Ferrari."


    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine

    Leave a comment:

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