Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Biggest bone headed move

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Biggest bone headed move

    Elsewhere on this page JDP describes his biggest bone headed move of the year. His description provokes me to suggest that others have a world-class car-related bone-headed move to report. Rather than hijack his thread, I hereby start a separate thread where we can all describe examples of our own stupidity. Here's my submission.

    64 Daytona up on four jackstands in the garage. Was doing brakes, front and rear, and converting to silicone brake fluid -- which requires replacing all brake-system rubber parts and flushing all of the old fluid out of the system. Had removed the master cylinder, all four wheel cylinders, and all three brake hoses. The idea was to flush the steel brake lines with something that will evaporate quickly and not remain in the lines to mix with the new fluid. I think I used acetone, though it may have been lacquer thinner -- both evaporate very quickly.

    I squirted a fair amount of the acetone in each brake line at the master cylinder end, then applied some compressed air to expel the solvent. No problems on the line to the front brakes -- some fluid squirted out of the lines where they screw into the rubber brake hoses. But doing the same thing to the rear line didn't go so well. As soon as I applied some air to the rear brake line, there was a "whump" sound (one that we all know well) from the back of the car, and a big flash of yellow light. The acetone had squirted out of the steel brake line attached to the rear axle and made a direct hit on the trouble light I had hanging there. The bulb had broken and had ignited the acetone. The burning acetone had landed on newspaper that I had spread all over the garage floor to catch the brake fluid, and set it on fire. By the time I got back there to see what was going on, the whole area under the gas tank was in flames.[:0] Fortunately, a fire extinguisher was nearby, and the newspaper was consumed pretty quickly anyway. Aside from filling the garage with black smoke, there was no permanent damage.

    This was not the only time that I have had a trouble light bulb physically explode, but it was the only time it actually started a fire. I try to treat them with more care these days (and I still keep a fire extinguisher handy).

    Skip Lackie
    Skip Lackie

  • #2
    Heres a good one.
    Back in the mid 60's I had a 66 Olds. convertable and a sand drivway.
    You filled the fuel tank behind the lic. plate. I looked out one afternoon to see my 2 year old son helping me, by filling the tank with sand. I ran out and got that stopped but now how do I get the sand out of the neck? I devised a stick with a paddel to get most out but there was still some left. What next??? A canaster vacum cleaner should work. Well it will, untill it ignites the fumes. Wife said it looked like a flying saucer on the end of a hose. She needed a new vacum anyway.
    Klif

    55 Speedster
    42 Champ Coupe
    55 Speedster/Street Machine
    63 Avanti R2
    64 Convertible R1

    Comment


    • #3
      Heres a good one.
      Back in the mid 60's I had a 66 Olds. convertable and a sand drivway.
      You filled the fuel tank behind the lic. plate. I looked out one afternoon to see my 2 year old son helping me, by filling the tank with sand. I ran out and got that stopped but now how do I get the sand out of the neck? I devised a stick with a paddel to get most out but there was still some left. What next??? A canaster vacum cleaner should work. Well it will, untill it ignites the fumes. Wife said it looked like a flying saucer on the end of a hose. She needed a new vacum anyway.
      Klif

      55 Speedster
      42 Champ Coupe
      55 Speedster/Street Machine
      63 Avanti R2
      64 Convertible R1

      Comment


      • #4
        I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

        Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

        Comment


        • #5
          I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

          Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

          Comment


          • #6
            I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

            Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

            Comment


            • #7
              I love it! I'd like to see ET ride home on that vacuum cleaner!

              Years ago my dad's memory was going. He'd drained the coolant out of the tractor that fall (something we normally did) but forgot to refill it. I knew nothing of this and the first good day of spring, I headed to the field with it. The temp guage was on the cold peg, but that's what you'd expect with a cold engine. Put it under a good load and shortly I knew it was hot but the gauge still said cold. To make a long story short, I galled a couple of pistons and we got th espring crop in but had to overhaul it afterwards. I think the only thing that saved the Perkins diesel was a 12 quart crankcase and dry sleeves which conducted the heat to the block better. Now that was a real expensive boner!

              Comment


              • #8
                Just had one happen today for the first time. On my way to DC early this morning I stopped for gas. Ran the credit card through, got approval, lifted the hose and with the other hand hit the grade selection. Well the last clown had left the lock on the handle and gas shot everywhere.


                Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

                Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just had one happen today for the first time. On my way to DC early this morning I stopped for gas. Ran the credit card through, got approval, lifted the hose and with the other hand hit the grade selection. Well the last clown had left the lock on the handle and gas shot everywhere.


                  Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                  Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

                  Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                  Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                  The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                  �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                  For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                  "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Around 1979, my wife had a 73 VW "Squareback". A friend an I tuned it up and my friend put in the points. We started it up and it did not run good and it rapidly got worse. We though it had swallowed a valve as VWs were prone to do. We decided to tear down the engine. The valves looked OK, but we replaced them anyway and installed new rings. When we were putting the distributor back on, we noticed that there was a screw that is supposed to hold the points down, loose in the distrubutor. My friend said "oh, that's the screw I was looking for". I still think the loose screw was the only thing wrong with that engine.

                    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Around 1979, my wife had a 73 VW "Squareback". A friend an I tuned it up and my friend put in the points. We started it up and it did not run good and it rapidly got worse. We though it had swallowed a valve as VWs were prone to do. We decided to tear down the engine. The valves looked OK, but we replaced them anyway and installed new rings. When we were putting the distributor back on, we noticed that there was a screw that is supposed to hold the points down, loose in the distrubutor. My friend said "oh, that's the screw I was looking for". I still think the loose screw was the only thing wrong with that engine.

                      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would rather not discuss my bone-headed moves.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would rather not discuss my bone-headed moves.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well, I once owned a top condition -64 Hawk, and actually sold it for no special reason. Dummest move I've ever done.
                            Now I have a -63 Hawk with some rust repairs on the go. I still shake my head when I recall selling that -64.
                            /H

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, I once owned a top condition -64 Hawk, and actually sold it for no special reason. Dummest move I've ever done.
                              Now I have a -63 Hawk with some rust repairs on the go. I still shake my head when I recall selling that -64.
                              /H

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X