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  • #31
    Good luck, Gord. What a great project! Your advice on the Champ clutch was invaluable. What a pleasure to drive now. Whadda I owe you?

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    • #32
      Gord, that is a nice second series '64 Daytona Hardtop! [^]

      Does it have a "custom" Vinyl covered roof, or is that black paint someone added?

      StudeRich
      Studebakers Northwest
      Ferndale, WA
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #33
        Rich, it has a "custom" fake vinyl roof, 2 strips of convex-section tape, and a mess of textured paint that resembles undercoating, but is harder to take off. Lacquer thinner made the color run, but did not soften it enough to permit it to be scraped off. Thinners DID work wonders on the rattle-can black paint under the hood, though.

        What makes it a second-series?

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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        • #34
          Well it may not be a big deal to you Canucks, but here it is! The late '64 Canadian "Imports" all have those White (Ivory) Steering Wheels and Crossed Flags with no V-8 emblem, quite noticeable to us! [:0]

          I think it may have been Bob Palma (alias:'64 Daytona Bob) who coined that term "Second Series", (or maybe Fred Fox) and I always use it to describe a late '64.

          quote:Originally posted by gordr

          What makes it a second-series?
          StudeRich
          Studebakers Northwest
          Ferndale, WA
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #35
            I getcha. Sometimes little things like that escape my notice.

            Put this one down to: "best-laid plans, etc."

            I took off this afternoon in the Daytona with the plan to drive in to Calgary to do some shopping. Got about 20 miles from home, and heard a funny sound after I hit a bump at speed passing a slower vehicle on the highway. I was doing about 65 mph.

            Shortly after, the temp gage began to climb, and I saw droplets of coolant on the windshield. I turned onto a secondary road and slowed right down, which allowed the engine to cool down a bit, and then I began to head homeward on the grid roads. Made it about 6 miles back, and hit the next paved road, when the temp gage again started rising fast. I turned onto the pavement, and shut off the engine and coasted about a half-mile downhill to a turnout. Had a look under the hood. The radiator had come back and kissed the fan, and was squirting fine jets of coolant out about 6 tiny holes.

            I picked up my cellphone, and called my neighbor, who came down and fetched me home. I hitched up the car trailer to the Suburban, and went right back and loaded the car, which I was able to drive onto the trailer OK, except for one problem. The muffler snagged on the back edge of the trailer deck, and slipped right off the front pipe, doubling up and breaking the tailpipe in the process. The tailpipe WAS old and thin, so there is no great loss there. I may have an NOS tailpipe on hand, too.

            Got it home without further incident, and went to work helping the neighbor hook up the lights and brakes on his travel trailer, so they could take it to the campground on the river for the long weekend.

            After making myself some hot dogs for supper, I pulled the rad out, and found that the right side mounting bracket had come completely free of the top and bottom tanks, allowing the radiator to swing like a gate into the fan. Motor mounts, at least at the front, are OK. The engine had stayed put. So I soldered up the holes in about 5 radiator tubes, and cleaned rad tanks and bracket, and soldered that back on, too. Reinstalled it in the car, and it appears to hold water; at least I could see no streams of water in the dusk.

            I had thought about taking this car to the Northwest Overdrive, but I guess it's not quite ready for prime time. I think this is a case where some "might as wells" could be piled together into a project: take the front fenders, grille, and radiator saddle out; knock out the frost plugs, and pressure-wash the crud out of the water jackets; drop the oil pan and replace the filler block at the front (remove timing cover if need be); detail the engine a bit and clean/paint the front end, changing the A-arm bushings if required; shoot a coat of white paint on the firewall and on the aprons of the set of patched-up front fenders I have sitting in the back of my old Wagonaire; hang the new fenders back on the car. No question, but what the mechanical work is easier with the fenders and aprons set aside, and the front fenders are by far the rustiest part of the outer body shell.

            By the way, that engine never blew any blue smoke on its road trip, and held 60 psi oil pressure at cruise. I'd say it's a pretty tight engine, yet.

            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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