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  • Possible replication venture?

    I've been wondering about the things still in the SNM archives. Do they have engineering plans for Studebaker's early vehicles? Would it be possible to recreate the earliest Studebaker (electric) models from extant drawings? Even if they had no running gear, I think it would be very interesting to see them recreated so we can see in person what they were like. There are so many early models that only seem to exist in pictures. They would be excellent additions to the museum.

    If they are primarily wooden vehicles, couldn't it be done? If such drawings exist I don't see why it couldn't, after all, whole sailing ships like the Mayflower have been recreated. You'd think we could manage a few small cars.

    Maybe the same thing could be done with some of the more interesting horse drawn types.
    "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

  • #2
    Scott--

    Cool idea. I'm used to seeing this concept floated frequently on vintage aircraft fora...as an example, one of the UK old-plane fora has a member who is slowly but surely replicating a deHavilland 103 Hornet, a 1945-era twin-engined fighter that, as a type, is both terrifically charismatic and, sadly, extinct today. (It was fast, too, especially for a twin, able to approach 500mph on the level). And in New Zealand, a gentleman named Glyn Powell has re-created the complex molds for the plywood fuselage of the Hornet's famous elder sister the DH Mosquito, and can now manufacture the all-wood airframe complete, with three fuselages off the molds thus far, two of which will fly again (there has not been a flyable Mosquito anywhere since 1996).

    All that to say that if something as complex as a World War II combat aircraft can be brought back from nothing--and the above are just two of many examples showing that is possible--then antique automobiles, carriages, and such should certainly be possible. An antique electric auto would be especially interesting as a kind of timewarp technology demonstrator (everything old is new again!). Or...how about a Studebaker Electric with a modern electric powertrain under the skin! Of course these ideas would not be inexpensive; demand would dictate feasibility, same as with the classic airplanes. But I like the concept...

    S.

    Comment


    • #3
      It might even be possible to recreate the pieces by taking the drawings and converting them to CAD data, thereby allowing a CNC machine to carve some of the trickier pieces. With drawings, creating virtual models would almost be a snap. I could do it.
      "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

      Comment


      • #4
        Does anyone have contact info for the guy that was building a totally electric 2R truck? I sold him some parts well over a year ago and lost my contact info. He was well into his project at that time and I'd like to know if it ever took to the road.

        Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
        1960 Larkvertible V8
        1958 Provincial wagon
        1953 Commander coupe
        1957 President two door

        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

        Comment


        • #5
          At the livestock show, they have old tractors and one lung engines and such equipment,
          a fellow had an old car with a tiller,(don't remember Brand) but he made it out of old photo he had of that car. He and his wife dress in old grab of the time and rode around the grounds Neato!

          Ebon...


          Comment


          • #6
            Carroll Studebaker had two electrics at Gettysburg 1980. I remember the fenders were leather, stretched and stitched over steel rod frames, then polished 'till they glistened like steel.

            Anyone remember the most recent meets where electrics were present?
            Surely more recent than 1980.

            Brad Johnson
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight
            Brad Johnson,
            SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight. '53 Commander Starlight
            '56 Sky Hawk in process

            Comment


            • #7
              There was one at Red Wing, MN in the casino hotel lobby.


              Gary Sanders
              Nixa, MO
              President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
              Gary Sanders
              Nixa, MO

              Comment


              • #8
                Actually, when it comes to the horse-drawn vehicles, there are examples of most of Studebaker's offerings available to view. One just has to know where to look. There are dozens of Carriage Museums all over the United States. Most of them are private and are open only by appointment. Many are also public, so are easy to find. Shoot, Guido's well on the way to having one himself! Check with the Carriage Association Of America.

                As to the early electrics, they seem to have been based on the Buggy and Surrey models that Studebaker was offering at the time. The bodies and running gear would be a snap to reproduce. Most of it is available through Amish suppliers all over the North Eastern U.S. The Drivetrain would be a bit difficult though.

                Oh, by the by, those fenders? They're patent leather. It was a common practice to sew two layers of leather over a metal frame for fenders and dash-boards. Dash-boards on a horse drawn vehicle, by the way, went from the toe board up to about elbow, or just above waist, height on most carriages. Sometimes they had a brass rein-rail (at extra cost) running across the top edge. A leather dash would usually bend slightly towards the horses in a graceful arch starting at about mid-point. Patent fenders and dashes were a higher level option and were costly.

                By the by. I found several running gears this week. A friend has three (at least) that were left at their house years ago. Sadly, the bodies have returned to the earth. From what's left there seem to be a Concord buggy, a light spring wagon or farm Surrey, and a Mountain Spring Wagon. Neat stuff!



                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                Lotsa Larks!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                Comment


                • #9
                  http://cgi.ebay.com/1902-Studebaker-...QQcmdZViewItem

                  Don't know if this would help but found this 1902 electric brochure on ebay just now.

                  Chop Stu
                  61 Lark

                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's a great brochure. I wish I didn't have other priorities for my money. Those are the kind of vehicles I'd like to see replicated. Don't you love the name on one of them - Studebaker Trap?
                    "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Now that is a great idea. I think it would be possible but not easy.
                      Speaking about reproducing Old Studebakers, my dad and I are currently building a mid 20's Stude Delivery Van. We started with a chassis and running gear and built a body for it from lots of old drawing and photos we had found in books. It's currently all framed up and awaiting the sheet metal to be put on the out side. I really think it look like how studebaker built them in the 20's.

                      Michael Pink
                      Victoria, Australia

                      1955 Commander Sedan
                      1955 Commander Coupe
                      1961 Lark Cruiser
                      1963 Avanti R1



                      Studebaker Car Club Of Austrlaia Website
                      http://www.studebakercarclub.net
                      Michael Pink
                      Victoria, Australia

                      1955 Commander Coupe
                      1961 Lark Cruiser
                      1962 GT Hawk
                      1963 Avanti R1



                      Studebaker Car Club Of Australia Website
                      http://www.studebakercarclub.net

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well Micheal, that's often what one has to do with vehicles from the dawn of the Twentieth Century. Often, when restoring horse-drawn vehicles, all that's left is the metal work. In fact, a customer has given me the remains of, possibly, three such vehicles. I took them home today. There is very little left of the bodies and noting to indicate the builder. So, I'll be doing a lot of guessing... kinda like what you're doing, only worse.

                        Good luck and post some pictures when you have them, Mick. Sounds like you have a really cool project going down there.[8D]


                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        Lotsa Larks!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

                          Well Micheal, that's often what one has to do with vehicles from the dawn of the Twentieth Century. Often, when restoring horse-drawn vehicles, all that's left is the metal work. In fact, a customer has given me the remains of, possibly, three such vehicles. I took them home today. There is very little left of the bodies and noting to indicate the builder. So, I'll be doing a lot of guessing... kinda like what you're doing, only worse.

                          Good luck and post some pictures when you have them, Mick. Sounds like you have a really cool project going down there.[8D]


                          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                          Lotsa Larks!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                          Well we are fixing the timber slat's to the fram this weekend so ill take some photos of it and post them after we are done. We are currently aiming to have the van finished by easter next year to take to the Stude Nationals down here

                          Michael Pink
                          Victoria, Australia

                          1955 Commander Sedan
                          1955 Commander Coupe
                          1961 Lark Cruiser
                          1963 Avanti R1



                          Studebaker Car Club Of Austrlaia Website
                          http://www.studebakercarclub.net
                          Michael Pink
                          Victoria, Australia

                          1955 Commander Coupe
                          1961 Lark Cruiser
                          1962 GT Hawk
                          1963 Avanti R1



                          Studebaker Car Club Of Australia Website
                          http://www.studebakercarclub.net

                          Comment

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