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Now THIS is a barn find!

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  • showbizkid
    replied
    Here's the 1936 Ace on display at the SNM. It's a flatbed, not a van, but there are similarities of course...




    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 F2/Lark Standard
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
    www.studebakersandiego.com

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  • studeclunker
    replied
    There are two easy ways to determine if this was a horse van. First examine the floor inside to see if there is evidence of dividers. second, check the side door to see if it has cleats on it. A moving van wouldn't have these as a dolly won't roll over them easily. The door leaning up against the back looks like it has cleats on it. This door would have been hinged on the bottom and would have dropped down as a ramp. If there are counter-weights or springs on the doorframe, this would indicate the correct kind of door.

    I too love the COE trucks. They have a wonderful look to them and great styling. Well, at least the cab has great styling. This one is a particularly cool example. Ah, where is a winning lottery ticket when you need it?

    You know, looking at those photos, it looks like the van body was just attached to the top of the cab. In otherwords, if one wanted to just ditch the van body, the truck cab would be complete with it's roof.


    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith
    Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

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  • railway
    replied
    [quote]Originally posted by lstude



    I am enclosing a Coachbuilt.com that discusses my Dad's company - Montpelier Manufacturing Company.

    http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/m/mont...montpelier.htm

    Thanks for posting the picture.
    Jim Schwartz[/i]



    I have a body on a M-15A that looks a lot like this one.




    Ebon...
    [img][/img]

    "I sweat to keep others cool"

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  • wolfie
    replied
    Just curious,Alan, Did you ever get this truck?Steve

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  • lstude
    replied
    I posted the photo that Alan posted of the 36 COE on the H.A.M.B. forum and I got this email:

    Mr Shepherd, I am just trying to connect some "Dots" about Dad & Montpelier for years 1935 & 1936 and their influence in the industry development of the cab-over-engine etc and found your interesting picture of a 1936 Studebaker Van. The Van body looks like a Montpelier body on a Studebaker Cab Forward and wonder whether, if am right.

    Montpelier Body works was located in Montpelier, Ohio or the northwest corner of Ohio. Also it was only hundred miles from South Bend and during the war they built a large number of wood cargo bodies for the Studebaker US6.

    I am enclosing a Coachbuilt.com that discusses my Dad's company - Montpelier Manufacturing Company.

    http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/m/mont...montpelier.htm

    Thanks for posting the picture.
    Jim Schwartz







    Leonard Shepherd
    http://leonardshepherd.com/

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  • super1hawk
    replied
    The doors are for sure genuine cab forward doors. In some of the pictures the doors are squared off at the top and these are not cab forward doors. I really feel for the person that is going to restore this truck. There is a lot of wood in those beasts. I have some of the wood drawn out as patterns. I am working on making the cab forwards I have more sturdy with welded sheetmetal components vs the wood. I do think the wood may be intact since the doors are still on the truck. Most of the time when the wood is weak behind the hinges the doors fall off. I am interested in the truck but will not be able to spend big dollars on it since I boughe another 36 truck in January.

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  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    The Sears truck body was made by the Bryan Specialty Company of Bryan, Ohio. Bryan lies roughly half way between Toledo and Ft Wayne, Indiana in the northwestern part of Ohio. That is about all I can tell you. The photo may very well have been taken in Cleveland.

    As for Alan's query on the cab bodies I can tell you that they were wood framed (and a real nightmare to rewood). While I assumed that they were made by Studebaker I am not sure of this. Being fairly low production they could very well have outsourced this work. Incidentally at the same time (1936) the conventional cab trucks were all steel.

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review

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  • kurtruk
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by alanmende

    Hello Dick,

    Your first note indicated that Studebaker didn't build truck bodies. Did they build the cabs? The reason I ask is that in looking through Howard Applegate's Studebaker Trucks 1927-1940 Photo Archive, I see many cab forward trucks with essentially the same cabs, though with different "revenue producing" bodies. If Studebaker produced their truck cabs, then for the truck body builders that did ones like this moving van, could Studebaker have sold them doors along with the chassis, cowl, and windshield header? The doors on this moving van seem different from the ones in most of the photos you posted in that most of them show window openings with square corners. Doors on the cabs in Applegate's book as well as the those on the moving van all have rounded corners in the window openings. I can't really see any difference between them. Oh yes, one more thing -- if Studebaker built cabs, were they of composite construction with a wood framework covered with sheet metal? That's how the moving van doors are built.

    What's your take on this?

    Alan
    Hey, folks: He's thinkin about it!!

    And by the way: In Richard Quinn's block of four photos--the lower right photo--Where's the gold shield and UPS letters in the upper right[?] Man, change the nose and you've got today's brown delivery truck!!

    KURTRUK
    (read it backwards)

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  • barnlark
    replied
    RQ,
    Do you know the locations of some of those pictures. I swear the Sears truck is in front of buildings still existing in Cleveland on Superior Ave. There is also a Superior building downtown, as well. Common name probably in other cities, too, but they look very familiar. The Grabar Building looks local as well. Many of those painted company names are still visable and most of those buildings are still pretty sturdy and cheaper to renovate than to tear down. Great pictures, again!

    Leave a comment:


  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    Bob;
    For what it may be worth the truck has a Ohio license plate and the body was built by the Kelly Body Co. of Cincinnati. Therefore my guess as to location Cincinnati, Ohio 1936.

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Well, you learn something new everyday on this forum:

    Hi Bob. RE: Your post regarding Graybar Electric Co. Today we're 139 years old, employee owned since 1929.

    Two guys were in second place in the patent office line behind a guy named Alexander Graham Bell. They went to Bell and offered to build his telephone. They started their mfg. company as Gray & Barton Electric. Then later changed the name to Western Electric Co. Later WEC started a supply division called Western Electric Supply.

    The feds called foul in the mid 20's; claimed WEC was a monopoly. The parent sold the supply division off to the employees in 1929 who changed the name to Graybar Electric in honor of those two sleepyheads, Elisha Gray and Enos Barton.

    This is the very short version. Truly a unique company on the American scene. I'm proud to be one of those employee owners, one of nearly 8000 across the US and now Canada in some 300 locations. Cheers, David Orth 48M5 Sumner WA

    Cool beans, David. Interesting. (And here I thought Graybar was a name derived from one component of a fuse/circuit breaker or distribution box!) Thanks for bringing me up to speed.
    Congratulations on the company's success. [8D] Bob Palma

    Leave a comment:


  • alanmende
    replied
    Hello Dick,

    Your first note indicated that Studebaker didn't build truck bodies. Did they build the cabs? The reason I ask is that in looking through Howard Applegate's Studebaker Trucks 1927-1940 Photo Archive, I see many cab forward trucks with essentially the same cabs, though with different "revenue producing" bodies. If Studebaker produced their truck cabs, then for the truck body builders that did ones like this moving van, could Studebaker have sold them doors along with the chassis, cowl, and windshield header? The doors on this moving van seem different from the ones in most of the photos you posted in that most of them show window openings with square corners. Doors on the cabs in Applegate's book as well as the those on the moving van all have rounded corners in the window openings. I can't really see any difference between them. Oh yes, one more thing -- if Studebaker built cabs, were they of composite construction with a wood framework covered with sheet metal? That's how the moving van doors are built.

    What's your take on this?

    Alan

    Leave a comment:


  • bams50
    replied
    LOVE those pics! Thanks, all. That Sears van looks like the closest to the subject truck.

    I've always had a thing for cab-overs; It would be fun to have one, although I'd imagine they're not fun to drive long distances.

    Along those lines, I do have two 65 Falcon Club Wagon window vans... one good runner, one for parts. The brochure calls the cab-over design "metropolitan" styling.

    It's a kick to drive, and funny-looking too; double bonus[8D]

    Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
    Parish, central NY 13131

    "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311



    "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"



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  • lstude
    replied
    quote: RE: Dick's photo in the upper right, with Graybar Electric in the background. Graybar is in Indianapolis, but is it unique to Indianapolis? I.e, is it a nationwide or regional company? If not, then the photo was probably taken in Indianapolis. BP
    There is a Graybar Electric in Richmond. I was just in there buying electrical supplies.


    Leonard Shepherd
    http://leonardshepherd.com/

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  • avantilover
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

    RE: Dick's photo in the upper right, with Graybar Electric in the background. Graybar is in Indianapolis, but is it unique to Indianapolis? I.e, is it a nationwide or regional company? If not, then the photo was probably taken in Indianapolis. BP
    Graybar operates more than 250 distribution facilities throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Puerto Rico. Graybar has the resources of a big company combined with the drive and commitment to personal service of a neighborhood business.

    Try this link Bob,
    http://gbtrain.iperformonline.com/ji...m_frameset.htm

    John Clements
    Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
    Secretary Studebaker Car Club of SA (as of 3/19/08)
    Lockleys South Australia

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