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  • Strange Part Request

    Hello,

    This is to anyone who has restored the reel type antenna and can provide me with some advice.

    I have a reel type antenna for a 1959 Lark. Unfortunantly, the cable was cut in two, making the antenna useless at the moment. It is complete with both pieces of cable and all the other parts needed to make a good antenna.

    Does anyone have a spare cable? Is there a way to fix the broken one (i.e., sauder, weld, etc)?

    Thank you

    1947 Studebaker M-5
    1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
    1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
    1947 Studebaker M-5
    1946 Studebaker M-5
    1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
    1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
    1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

  • #2
    Do you mean the lead-in wire, or the plastic "rod" that spools the antenna mast up and down?

    I can think of no reliable way to splice the latter, but the lead-in wire can be spliced.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you mean the lead-in wire, or the plastic "rod" that spools the antenna mast up and down?

      I can think of no reliable way to splice the latter, but the lead-in wire can be spliced.

      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by gordr

        Do you mean the lead-in wire, or the plastic "rod" that spools the antenna mast up and down?

        I can think of no reliable way to splice the latter, but the lead-in wire can be spliced.

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Yeah, I am referring to the lead-in wire (if that is the wire that follows the entire part of the antenna). It is not plastic, so I am assuming this is it.

        Please excuse my ignorance, but what do you mean by "splicing it"

        1947 Studebaker M-5
        1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
        1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
        1947 Studebaker M-5
        1946 Studebaker M-5
        1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
        1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
        1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by gordr

          Do you mean the lead-in wire, or the plastic "rod" that spools the antenna mast up and down?

          I can think of no reliable way to splice the latter, but the lead-in wire can be spliced.

          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
          Yeah, I am referring to the lead-in wire (if that is the wire that follows the entire part of the antenna). It is not plastic, so I am assuming this is it.

          Please excuse my ignorance, but what do you mean by "splicing it"

          1947 Studebaker M-5
          1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
          1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
          1947 Studebaker M-5
          1946 Studebaker M-5
          1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
          1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
          1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

          Comment


          • #6
            Let's try again: is it the black wire that runs from the base of the antenna to the radio, or the "core" that is wound around the spool and runs up inside the antenna mast to extend/retract it?

            "Splice" is a term that means to effectively join the ends of two ropes, or cables, or wires. Properly done, a splice is nearly indistinguishable from the parent material.

            I have the guts of an old wind-up antenna around here someplace. I know power antennas I've tinkered with used a length of THICK nylon monofilament to operate the mast. Like extra-heavy weed whacker line, it is. That stuff, I don't think you could readily splice, as nylon doesn't take glue well, and is hard to weld, too.

            The lead-in wire, which plugs into the radio, can be quite easily spliced by using solder plus heat-shrink tubing.

            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

            Comment


            • #7
              Let's try again: is it the black wire that runs from the base of the antenna to the radio, or the "core" that is wound around the spool and runs up inside the antenna mast to extend/retract it?

              "Splice" is a term that means to effectively join the ends of two ropes, or cables, or wires. Properly done, a splice is nearly indistinguishable from the parent material.

              I have the guts of an old wind-up antenna around here someplace. I know power antennas I've tinkered with used a length of THICK nylon monofilament to operate the mast. Like extra-heavy weed whacker line, it is. That stuff, I don't think you could readily splice, as nylon doesn't take glue well, and is hard to weld, too.

              The lead-in wire, which plugs into the radio, can be quite easily spliced by using solder plus heat-shrink tubing.

              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't mean to hijack this thread but it seems to go right along. Is there a way to replace the antenna that has been broken off? What about mounting hardware? Does anyone sell replacement parts?




                Back on the real (reel) topic:
                As far as the cable goes, check out your local Radio Shack.

                Carey
                Packard Hawk

                Carey
                Packard Hawk

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't mean to hijack this thread but it seems to go right along. Is there a way to replace the antenna that has been broken off? What about mounting hardware? Does anyone sell replacement parts?




                  Back on the real (reel) topic:
                  As far as the cable goes, check out your local Radio Shack.

                  Carey
                  Packard Hawk

                  Carey
                  Packard Hawk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by gordr

                    Let's try again: is it the black wire that runs from the base of the antenna to the radio, or the "core" that is wound around the spool and runs up inside the antenna mast to extend/retract it?

                    "Splice" is a term that means to effectively join the ends of two ropes, or cables, or wires. Properly done, a splice is nearly indistinguishable from the parent material.

                    I have the guts of an old wind-up antenna around here someplace. I know power antennas I've tinkered with used a length of THICK nylon monofilament to operate the mast. Like extra-heavy weed whacker line, it is. That stuff, I don't think you could readily splice, as nylon doesn't take glue well, and is hard to weld, too.

                    The lead-in wire, which plugs into the radio, can be quite easily spliced by using solder plus heat-shrink tubing.

                    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                    I see, it is the core that is wound around the spool and makes the antenna retract and extend.

                    1947 Studebaker M-5
                    1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                    1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                    1947 Studebaker M-5
                    1946 Studebaker M-5
                    1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                    1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                    1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by gordr

                      Let's try again: is it the black wire that runs from the base of the antenna to the radio, or the "core" that is wound around the spool and runs up inside the antenna mast to extend/retract it?

                      "Splice" is a term that means to effectively join the ends of two ropes, or cables, or wires. Properly done, a splice is nearly indistinguishable from the parent material.

                      I have the guts of an old wind-up antenna around here someplace. I know power antennas I've tinkered with used a length of THICK nylon monofilament to operate the mast. Like extra-heavy weed whacker line, it is. That stuff, I don't think you could readily splice, as nylon doesn't take glue well, and is hard to weld, too.

                      The lead-in wire, which plugs into the radio, can be quite easily spliced by using solder plus heat-shrink tubing.

                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                      I see, it is the core that is wound around the spool and makes the antenna retract and extend.

                      1947 Studebaker M-5
                      1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                      1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                      1947 Studebaker M-5
                      1946 Studebaker M-5
                      1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                      1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                      1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My antennas (1951 & 1953) have cables like piano wire, not nylon. Maybe the later ones are different; I don't know

                        If it's spring steel cable, is it broken in halves or broken near the mast? Those antennas extend about 5 1/2 feet. If the break is near the mast, the remnant in the mast can be carefully drilled out. Then clean, flux and solder the cable back in to the mast. Maybe it will only extend five feet but that's twice as long as other antennas.

                        If the broken cable is too short to be serviceable, you'll need to find a replacement.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My antennas (1951 & 1953) have cables like piano wire, not nylon. Maybe the later ones are different; I don't know

                          If it's spring steel cable, is it broken in halves or broken near the mast? Those antennas extend about 5 1/2 feet. If the break is near the mast, the remnant in the mast can be carefully drilled out. Then clean, flux and solder the cable back in to the mast. Maybe it will only extend five feet but that's twice as long as other antennas.

                          If the broken cable is too short to be serviceable, you'll need to find a replacement.
                          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by rockne10

                            My antennas (1951 & 1953) have cables like piano wire, not nylon. Maybe the later ones are different; I don't know

                            If it's spring steel cable, is it broken in halves or broken near the mast? Those antennas extend about 5 1/2 feet. If the break is near the mast, the remnant in the mast can be carefully drilled out. Then clean, flux and solder the cable back in to the mast. Maybe it will only extend five feet but that's twice as long as other antennas.

                            If the broken cable is too short to be serviceable, you'll need to find a replacement.
                            It will probably need to be replaced as it seems to be right in the middle of the cable. Do you know anyone who would have a spare laying around?

                            1947 Studebaker M-5
                            1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                            1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                            1947 Studebaker M-5
                            1946 Studebaker M-5
                            1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                            1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                            1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by rockne10

                              My antennas (1951 & 1953) have cables like piano wire, not nylon. Maybe the later ones are different; I don't know

                              If it's spring steel cable, is it broken in halves or broken near the mast? Those antennas extend about 5 1/2 feet. If the break is near the mast, the remnant in the mast can be carefully drilled out. Then clean, flux and solder the cable back in to the mast. Maybe it will only extend five feet but that's twice as long as other antennas.

                              If the broken cable is too short to be serviceable, you'll need to find a replacement.
                              It will probably need to be replaced as it seems to be right in the middle of the cable. Do you know anyone who would have a spare laying around?

                              1947 Studebaker M-5
                              1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                              1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                              1947 Studebaker M-5
                              1946 Studebaker M-5
                              1948 Studebaker Land Cruiser
                              1961 Studebaker Lark 4-dr. Sedan
                              1951 Studebaker Land Cruiser

                              Comment

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