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Decent '55 Patrician for good price

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  • Decent '55 Patrician for good price

    Hi
    I know, not a Studebaker, but many of us like them and it was Studebaker-Packard Corporation after all.
    Just when you think there are no more good cars for a realistic price.

    http://oregoncars247.com/showcar.php?cardb_id=2512

    Nice car to enjoy, wish it was closer.
    Steve

  • #2
    If it were on the east coast, I would give serious thought to buying it.


    http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

    Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
    Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

    The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

    �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

    For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

    "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

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    • #3
      If it were on the east coast, I would give serious thought to buying it.


      http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

      Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
      Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

      The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

      �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

      For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

      "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

      Comment


      • #4
        quote: If it were on the east coast, I would give serious thought to buying it.


        Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"
        Maybe you could trade your 52 Packard for it!

        Leonard Shepherd
        http://leonardshepherd.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          quote: If it were on the east coast, I would give serious thought to buying it.


          Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"
          Maybe you could trade your 52 Packard for it!

          Leonard Shepherd
          http://leonardshepherd.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            That is a nice example of an uncommon automobile. Don't want to offend anyone here, but is it really any wonder these were the last of the true Packard breed? Look at that thing - tall, narrow, ungainly - it looks like a 57 Lincoln that got kicked in the rear really hard.

            Too bad they had to go out on such an uncomely note. They were the standard of prestige in this country until the late '30s.

            Comment


            • #7
              That is a nice example of an uncommon automobile. Don't want to offend anyone here, but is it really any wonder these were the last of the true Packard breed? Look at that thing - tall, narrow, ungainly - it looks like a 57 Lincoln that got kicked in the rear really hard.

              Too bad they had to go out on such an uncomely note. They were the standard of prestige in this country until the late '30s.

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by bullet_nose_stude

                That is a nice example of an uncommon automobile. Don't want to offend anyone here, but is it really any wonder these were the last of the true Packard breed? Look at that thing - tall, narrow, ungainly - it looks like a 57 Lincoln that got kicked in the rear really hard.

                Too bad they had to go out on such an uncomely note. They were the standard of prestige in this country until the late '30s.
                I disagree! Dick Teague and crew did a nice job of so totally freshening the 1951 body to create the 1955 Packard that few people realize it is really John Rinehart's well-disguised 1951 underneath. The 1955 came off quite contemporary in apparance, with the singular limitation being the high waist line they just couldn't get rid of.

                The real reason the 1955 Packards didn't share the roaring sales of the whole industry is that they couldn't build them fast enough or early enough. New engines, a heavily-reworked automatic transmission, and all-new suspension combined with having to make their own bodies for the first time and trying to assemble the cars in a new, too-small facility, all combined to produce a production disaster that resulted in one delay after another...with attendant quality problems resulting.

                I'll not repeat the stories of my father and his brother, having been Packard dealers in a small town for only two years, being unable to get any new Packards to sell in the fall of 1954 -none, not one 1955 Packard or Clipper of any model- was delivered to their dealership during calendar year 1954.

                How many new Cadillacs did the Chevrolet-Cadillac dealer one door down from them sell after potential buyers had stopped in Palma Motors to see how that reportedly-wonderful new Packard suspension worked with that big new [finally!] V-8, only to be greated by an empty showroom?

                No, that the 1955 Packard sold in fewer numbers than Studebaker-Packard hoped, had little to do with the car's style, but had everything to do with inexcusable production delays and unacceptable build quality (for a Packard) on those that were shipped. [^]BP

                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by bullet_nose_stude

                  That is a nice example of an uncommon automobile. Don't want to offend anyone here, but is it really any wonder these were the last of the true Packard breed? Look at that thing - tall, narrow, ungainly - it looks like a 57 Lincoln that got kicked in the rear really hard.

                  Too bad they had to go out on such an uncomely note. They were the standard of prestige in this country until the late '30s.
                  I disagree! Dick Teague and crew did a nice job of so totally freshening the 1951 body to create the 1955 Packard that few people realize it is really John Rinehart's well-disguised 1951 underneath. The 1955 came off quite contemporary in apparance, with the singular limitation being the high waist line they just couldn't get rid of.

                  The real reason the 1955 Packards didn't share the roaring sales of the whole industry is that they couldn't build them fast enough or early enough. New engines, a heavily-reworked automatic transmission, and all-new suspension combined with having to make their own bodies for the first time and trying to assemble the cars in a new, too-small facility, all combined to produce a production disaster that resulted in one delay after another...with attendant quality problems resulting.

                  I'll not repeat the stories of my father and his brother, having been Packard dealers in a small town for only two years, being unable to get any new Packards to sell in the fall of 1954 -none, not one 1955 Packard or Clipper of any model- was delivered to their dealership during calendar year 1954.

                  How many new Cadillacs did the Chevrolet-Cadillac dealer one door down from them sell after potential buyers had stopped in Palma Motors to see how that reportedly-wonderful new Packard suspension worked with that big new [finally!] V-8, only to be greated by an empty showroom?

                  No, that the 1955 Packard sold in fewer numbers than Studebaker-Packard hoped, had little to do with the car's style, but had everything to do with inexcusable production delays and unacceptable build quality (for a Packard) on those that were shipped. [^]BP

                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry about that, Mr. Palma. Like I said, not to offend. It's just not a style that I particularly cater to - but I didn't particularly cater to the 51-54 models, either. I guess Mr. Reinhart did the best with what he had to work with.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sorry about that, Mr. Palma. Like I said, not to offend. It's just not a style that I particularly cater to - but I didn't particularly cater to the 51-54 models, either. I guess Mr. Reinhart did the best with what he had to work with.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I also don't think styling was the issue. I remember when the 55 cars came out. I thought the Packard was a standout. Back then I didn't even notice the Lincoln,even though I think it is a nice looking car today. But the Lincoln was not as contemporary as the Packard IMO.






                        Leonard Shepherd
                        http://leonardshepherd.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I also don't think styling was the issue. I remember when the 55 cars came out. I thought the Packard was a standout. Back then I didn't even notice the Lincoln,even though I think it is a nice looking car today. But the Lincoln was not as contemporary as the Packard IMO.






                          Leonard Shepherd
                          http://leonardshepherd.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by bullet_nose_stude

                            Sorry about that, Mr. Palma. Like I said, not to offend. It's just not a style that I particularly cater to - but I didn't particularly cater to the 51-54 models, either. I guess Mr. Reinhart did the best with what he had to work with.
                            That's OK, bullet-nose. Styling is, of course, a personal matter.

                            The point I wanted to stress was that it wasn't 1955 Packard styling that was the problem; the car was well-received and they could have sold twice as many, seriously, had they been available when they should have been. I just didn't want to let the car's styling stand as being the reason for poor sales, because it wasn't. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by bullet_nose_stude

                              Sorry about that, Mr. Palma. Like I said, not to offend. It's just not a style that I particularly cater to - but I didn't particularly cater to the 51-54 models, either. I guess Mr. Reinhart did the best with what he had to work with.
                              That's OK, bullet-nose. Styling is, of course, a personal matter.

                              The point I wanted to stress was that it wasn't 1955 Packard styling that was the problem; the car was well-received and they could have sold twice as many, seriously, had they been available when they should have been. I just didn't want to let the car's styling stand as being the reason for poor sales, because it wasn't. BP
                              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                              Ayn Rand:
                              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                              Comment

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