Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lost or Rare Factory Studebaker Stories?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    quote:Originally posted by fstst56

    Bob Palma, did that Hawk come from the factory with the leather interior or was it installed by an outside source before it was delivered to the customer?
    Johnnie: That's a good question! My Dad swears they had to run the car somewhere outside South Bend to have the leather installed on the seats before it got to Paris, and the car's build order has the most complicated set of production-line jibberish I've ever seen on a Production Order...and I've reviewed thousands of them!

    For TRIM, that line on the Build Order says:

    T Special (see below)

    Then, the following notations are typed all over the bottom of the production order:

    USE TRIM 8445 WRD 347 EXCEPT FOR THE FOLLOWING:
    1A: Use 1313010-RRD in place of 1313010-OFW
    1B: Use 1313010-RRD in place of 1313010-CHB
    4A: Use 1313011-RRD in place of 1313011-OFW
    26 Use new Rear Seat Back Shelf Cover & Ext Assy 1313419x6 Romany Red color-supplied by Engineering.
    Use matching color Rear Seat Back Shelf Cover Fast 306331x23 supplied by Eng.
    NOTE: Use matching color---------------------1742x65 Romany Red thread.
    Service For Wholesale Delivery


    Now, Johnnie, if you can figure out all that, you're better than anyone who has yet taken a stab at it! I simply don't know what all those internal trim codes and parts refer to. I'm of the opinion (just an opinion, you understand) that the car may have left the factory with the interior all done except leather on the actual seats themselves, and that the leather on the seats was installed nearby, possibly at an outside trim shop contracted by Studebaker.

    That sounds weird, but Dad has repeatedly said the car was a further pain in the a** because "we had to run it all over, getting those leather seats put in it."

    I do know that when it arrived at Palma-Rhoads Motors in Paris IL, the leather interior was entirely in place. How do I know that? Because, even though I was only ten years old, I distinctly remember that car being at the dealership when it was brand new, just before delivery! I hung around "the shop" a lot, and remember sitting in the car, smelling the new leather, before it was delivered to lawyer Riley McClain of Metcalfe IL on March 31, 1956...which also happened to be my mother's 39th birthday!

    It was easily the most distinctive and unique car my father ever sold new during 1953-1956 at new-car dealerships in Paris. (Later, he and Uncle Milt bought the Ford/Mercury dealership in Ottawa IL in late spring 1964. One of the cars in stock they got stuck with was a huge, salmon-colored 1964 Mercury Park Lane convertible with white top and interior...and a 4-speed! Someone had ordered the big Mercury and then didn't take delivery for whatever reason, so they had to take it as part of the new-car inventory when they bought the place. They ultimately sold that Mercury at considerable loss well into the 1965 model year. In fairness, that Mercury was probably as unique as was this Cambridge Grey 1956 Golden Hawk.) BP



    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #47
      quote:Originally posted by fstst56

      Bob Palma, did that Hawk come from the factory with the leather interior or was it installed by an outside source before it was delivered to the customer?
      Johnnie: That's a good question! My Dad swears they had to run the car somewhere outside South Bend to have the leather installed on the seats before it got to Paris, and the car's build order has the most complicated set of production-line jibberish I've ever seen on a Production Order...and I've reviewed thousands of them!

      For TRIM, that line on the Build Order says:

      T Special (see below)

      Then, the following notations are typed all over the bottom of the production order:

      USE TRIM 8445 WRD 347 EXCEPT FOR THE FOLLOWING:
      1A: Use 1313010-RRD in place of 1313010-OFW
      1B: Use 1313010-RRD in place of 1313010-CHB
      4A: Use 1313011-RRD in place of 1313011-OFW
      26 Use new Rear Seat Back Shelf Cover & Ext Assy 1313419x6 Romany Red color-supplied by Engineering.
      Use matching color Rear Seat Back Shelf Cover Fast 306331x23 supplied by Eng.
      NOTE: Use matching color---------------------1742x65 Romany Red thread.
      Service For Wholesale Delivery


      Now, Johnnie, if you can figure out all that, you're better than anyone who has yet taken a stab at it! I simply don't know what all those internal trim codes and parts refer to. I'm of the opinion (just an opinion, you understand) that the car may have left the factory with the interior all done except leather on the actual seats themselves, and that the leather on the seats was installed nearby, possibly at an outside trim shop contracted by Studebaker.

      That sounds weird, but Dad has repeatedly said the car was a further pain in the a** because "we had to run it all over, getting those leather seats put in it."

      I do know that when it arrived at Palma-Rhoads Motors in Paris IL, the leather interior was entirely in place. How do I know that? Because, even though I was only ten years old, I distinctly remember that car being at the dealership when it was brand new, just before delivery! I hung around "the shop" a lot, and remember sitting in the car, smelling the new leather, before it was delivered to lawyer Riley McClain of Metcalfe IL on March 31, 1956...which also happened to be my mother's 39th birthday!

      It was easily the most distinctive and unique car my father ever sold new during 1953-1956 at new-car dealerships in Paris. (Later, he and Uncle Milt bought the Ford/Mercury dealership in Ottawa IL in late spring 1964. One of the cars in stock they got stuck with was a huge, salmon-colored 1964 Mercury Park Lane convertible with white top and interior...and a 4-speed! Someone had ordered the big Mercury and then didn't take delivery for whatever reason, so they had to take it as part of the new-car inventory when they bought the place. They ultimately sold that Mercury at considerable loss well into the 1965 model year. In fairness, that Mercury was probably as unique as was this Cambridge Grey 1956 Golden Hawk.) BP



      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #48
        This discussion brings up a question... I remember seeing a finned Hawk with a jump seat in the trunk. Was this a true Studebaker option or something a dealer or custom shop did for a customer?

        Lee

        Comment


        • #49
          This discussion brings up a question... I remember seeing a finned Hawk with a jump seat in the trunk. Was this a true Studebaker option or something a dealer or custom shop did for a customer?

          Lee

          Comment


          • #50
            I remember the Hawk with the rumble seat, but that has been many moons ago. I believe it was a custom job done outside South Bend. Ther should be a story on it way back in Turning Wheels. I don't know if it would show up in the index or not. Maybe Fred Fox could help locating it.

            Bob Palma, My Granpa went to a Ford dealer in 1964 to look at a 4-door fairlane. While he and the salesman were standing there looking at it, it started to rain. All 4 doors were locked. Next to it was a 2-door Fairlane 500. White with a black vinyl top, wire hubcaps, buckskin bucket seat interior with factory 4-speed. Grandpa came home with that car. I was hoping that would be my 1st car but he traded it off about 4 years before I got my license, so my Dad gave me his '61 Robin Egg Blue Lark 2-door hardtop, V-8 and automatic. And the rest, as they say, is history. (Sure would like to have both those cars yet today)

            Comment


            • #51
              I remember the Hawk with the rumble seat, but that has been many moons ago. I believe it was a custom job done outside South Bend. Ther should be a story on it way back in Turning Wheels. I don't know if it would show up in the index or not. Maybe Fred Fox could help locating it.

              Bob Palma, My Granpa went to a Ford dealer in 1964 to look at a 4-door fairlane. While he and the salesman were standing there looking at it, it started to rain. All 4 doors were locked. Next to it was a 2-door Fairlane 500. White with a black vinyl top, wire hubcaps, buckskin bucket seat interior with factory 4-speed. Grandpa came home with that car. I was hoping that would be my 1st car but he traded it off about 4 years before I got my license, so my Dad gave me his '61 Robin Egg Blue Lark 2-door hardtop, V-8 and automatic. And the rest, as they say, is history. (Sure would like to have both those cars yet today)

              Comment


              • #52
                quote:Originally posted by BobPalma
                That sounds weird, but Dad has repeatedly said the car was a further pain in the a** because "we had to run it all over, getting those leather seats put in it."
                Bob, I saw a copy of that production order myself. Besides all those notations about the interior, it has "S.A.P." written by hand and circled in various places on it as well. Obviously someone's time was of essence in the process. Perhaps your dad took it upon himself to do the 'legwork' of seeing the car go from production line to the outside trim shop to ensure adequate delivery time. (Remember! CUSTOMER SERVICE!!)

                On a side note, at the recent auto show here, I inquired about 'special orders' on some new cars such as BMW's "Individual" option where one can tailor their BMW to their liking. I was told 3-4 weeks. If one were to order an Aston-Martin in an 'Out of Range' paint color, or interior choice, he stated it would be up to a 7 month wait.

                Craig

                Comment


                • #53
                  quote:Originally posted by BobPalma
                  That sounds weird, but Dad has repeatedly said the car was a further pain in the a** because "we had to run it all over, getting those leather seats put in it."
                  Bob, I saw a copy of that production order myself. Besides all those notations about the interior, it has "S.A.P." written by hand and circled in various places on it as well. Obviously someone's time was of essence in the process. Perhaps your dad took it upon himself to do the 'legwork' of seeing the car go from production line to the outside trim shop to ensure adequate delivery time. (Remember! CUSTOMER SERVICE!!)

                  On a side note, at the recent auto show here, I inquired about 'special orders' on some new cars such as BMW's "Individual" option where one can tailor their BMW to their liking. I was told 3-4 weeks. If one were to order an Aston-Martin in an 'Out of Range' paint color, or interior choice, he stated it would be up to a 7 month wait.

                  Craig

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Regarding the Rumble Seat 1961 Hawks. Two were built. Photos and details may be found on Page 5 of the June 1989 Turning Wheels, as part of that issue's Feature Article: 1961 Hawks: Last of The Finned Hawks, by Fred Fox. BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Regarding the Rumble Seat 1961 Hawks. Two were built. Photos and details may be found on Page 5 of the June 1989 Turning Wheels, as part of that issue's Feature Article: 1961 Hawks: Last of The Finned Hawks, by Fred Fox. BP
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Don't overlook the rummbled seated Lark. The Lark is in Illinois. In pieces.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Don't overlook the rummbled seated Lark. The Lark is in Illinois. In pieces.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            There were supposedly 2 rumble seat 61 Larks also. One was rumored to have wound up stored in Metamora Illinois. I used to go through Metamora weekly on my way to car auctions in Tremont,and Morton.
                            I used to imagine taking a day in Met. to hunt down the car.Never did though.Maybe if I quit procrastinating and actually find it,it'll be "ready for restoration" [8D]

                            Oglesby,Il
                            61Hawk "Studebaker? It must be hard to find parts for those!"
                            Oglesby,Il.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              There were supposedly 2 rumble seat 61 Larks also. One was rumored to have wound up stored in Metamora Illinois. I used to go through Metamora weekly on my way to car auctions in Tremont,and Morton.
                              I used to imagine taking a day in Met. to hunt down the car.Never did though.Maybe if I quit procrastinating and actually find it,it'll be "ready for restoration" [8D]

                              Oglesby,Il
                              61Hawk "Studebaker? It must be hard to find parts for those!"
                              Oglesby,Il.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                A rare one that I find interesting is the M series truck with a wooden station wagon body. There is one pictured in Richard Langworth's book about Studebaker and the body was built in Mifflinburg, PA. IIRC, one appeared for sale a few years ago overseas somewhere, and it was supposedly the only one known to exist. (I'm sure someone here can correct me or fill in the details.) Did other custom body companies make these for Studebaker too?

                                I just find it hard to believe that there aren't a couple more of them somewhere. Of course, I doubt many were ever built in the first place.

                                Dave Bonn
                                Valencia, PA
                                '54 Champion Starliner

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X