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  • #31
    quote:Originally posted by wally
    So, why blame the seller for having a super-high Reserve, trying to cover his expenses and having a little compensation for his efforts?
    Actually, he won't cover ANY expenses if the car doesn't sell. And with an unrealistically high reserve, the chances of selling are slim. All he is doing (IMHO) is creating MORE expenses (ebay listing fees).


    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

    Comment


    • #32
      I agree, Dick. My comments were made in jest. Reason I have an axe to grind with reserves on an auction venue like EBay is because it does get your merchandise out there, and sellers typically get a premium price for choice items. They have little to complain about. But, I am still annoyed about the last Ebay listing I bid on. I have watched identical items being sold over the last two years, so I had a ballpark idea what they will bring. On this last "auction", (the same type item, but with very minor flaws) I was the top bidder, and a high one at that. By no means a giveaway price. Yet--the seller had a reserve on the item that was not met, so I did not "win" the auction. Seller did not re-list the item, or respond to any requests for information on the condition of the item. My gut feeling is that the seller(who is a frequent flyer there)sold the items anyway, in an offline transaction. By the way--they captioned their ad with a reference to "Rat Rods". To Me, that figures.

      Comment


      • #33
        I agree, Dick. My comments were made in jest. Reason I have an axe to grind with reserves on an auction venue like EBay is because it does get your merchandise out there, and sellers typically get a premium price for choice items. They have little to complain about. But, I am still annoyed about the last Ebay listing I bid on. I have watched identical items being sold over the last two years, so I had a ballpark idea what they will bring. On this last "auction", (the same type item, but with very minor flaws) I was the top bidder, and a high one at that. By no means a giveaway price. Yet--the seller had a reserve on the item that was not met, so I did not "win" the auction. Seller did not re-list the item, or respond to any requests for information on the condition of the item. My gut feeling is that the seller(who is a frequent flyer there)sold the items anyway, in an offline transaction. By the way--they captioned their ad with a reference to "Rat Rods". To Me, that figures.

        Comment


        • #34
          quote:Originally posted by wally

          Yet--the seller had a reserve on the item that was not met, so I did not "win" the auction. Seller did not re-list the item, or respond to any requests for information on the condition of the item. My gut feeling is that the seller(who is a frequent flyer there)sold the items anyway, in an offline transaction. By the way--they captioned their ad with a reference to "Rat Rods". To Me, that figures.

          I don't see the problem? Your bid didn't meet reserve, you asked the seller what he would take, he chose not to respond, maybe sold it outside of eBay. He was 100% within his rights! You wanted the item, might have been willing to pay his price, but he didn't offer it. What's the problem? No one has any responsibility to anyone to dispose of their property in a way that suits a stranger.

          JP sold me my 59 Lark VI. Listed it on eBay, and I asked him for a price. We made a deal, and I went to get it. I loaded the car, and JP killed the auction.

          He had every right to sell off-line and end his listing; or decide to keep it and end the listing. Or end it, change the terms, and relist it. That's his business, and no one else's. I really wanted that car. But if he decided no to sell it to me for whatever reason, I'd have just moved on and looked for another, continuing until I WAS able to make a deal; not upsetting in the least!

          I know from a few of your recent posts, you've got an axe to grind over eBay; you've made inaccurate statements against it. That's your right, as it is your right to never go to eBay for anything. But it IS an auction, and like any auction, there are a number of hurdles to get over: Seller must be willing, buyer also, price must be acceptible to both. If all those things can be achieved, you've got a transaction. If not, you don't. Just wait for another.

          Disappointing, maybe slightly frustrating, sure. To let that "annoy" you, and opine that somehow eBay is at fault doesn't make sense.

          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
          Parish, central NY 13131

          "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that parking is a pleasure, traffic is a breeze, turning's no trick at all, and happiness is a thing called Larking!"



          Comment


          • #35
            quote:Originally posted by wally

            Yet--the seller had a reserve on the item that was not met, so I did not "win" the auction. Seller did not re-list the item, or respond to any requests for information on the condition of the item. My gut feeling is that the seller(who is a frequent flyer there)sold the items anyway, in an offline transaction. By the way--they captioned their ad with a reference to "Rat Rods". To Me, that figures.

            I don't see the problem? Your bid didn't meet reserve, you asked the seller what he would take, he chose not to respond, maybe sold it outside of eBay. He was 100% within his rights! You wanted the item, might have been willing to pay his price, but he didn't offer it. What's the problem? No one has any responsibility to anyone to dispose of their property in a way that suits a stranger.

            JP sold me my 59 Lark VI. Listed it on eBay, and I asked him for a price. We made a deal, and I went to get it. I loaded the car, and JP killed the auction.

            He had every right to sell off-line and end his listing; or decide to keep it and end the listing. Or end it, change the terms, and relist it. That's his business, and no one else's. I really wanted that car. But if he decided no to sell it to me for whatever reason, I'd have just moved on and looked for another, continuing until I WAS able to make a deal; not upsetting in the least!

            I know from a few of your recent posts, you've got an axe to grind over eBay; you've made inaccurate statements against it. That's your right, as it is your right to never go to eBay for anything. But it IS an auction, and like any auction, there are a number of hurdles to get over: Seller must be willing, buyer also, price must be acceptible to both. If all those things can be achieved, you've got a transaction. If not, you don't. Just wait for another.

            Disappointing, maybe slightly frustrating, sure. To let that "annoy" you, and opine that somehow eBay is at fault doesn't make sense.

            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
            Parish, central NY 13131

            "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that parking is a pleasure, traffic is a breeze, turning's no trick at all, and happiness is a thing called Larking!"



            Comment


            • #36
              Sometimes I list cars for more than they are worth just to see, hey you never know, I see many cars that the range of value is simply controlled daily by who has tha cash,Maybe 500.oo today , 2500.00 tomorro,
              If someone close wants a 59 hardtop in about the same condition ,6cylinder ,3 speed od ,600.00 near Spokane , e me and I will hook you up.

              Comment


              • #37
                Sometimes I list cars for more than they are worth just to see, hey you never know, I see many cars that the range of value is simply controlled daily by who has tha cash,Maybe 500.oo today , 2500.00 tomorro,
                If someone close wants a 59 hardtop in about the same condition ,6cylinder ,3 speed od ,600.00 near Spokane , e me and I will hook you up.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Bams old buddy, We see the Irony of Ironies: Everyone is tsk,tsk-ing that guy for putting a reserve that doesn't suit them for that ol' Lark! To Clarify, I didn't "ask the seller what he would take", for the item I bid on, or anything like that! The seller is a very seasoned EBayer with over 4000 transactions, and they have a feedback just a hair over 98%, which tells me that they are um, shrewd. Again: I asked the seller a specific question about the condition of the item and NICELY, and they did not respond. I definitely bid a more than fair price for the item, based upon what the same part # in even better condition has sold for previously. I should mention that these items were being sold as a PAIR having the same part number,BTW, and earlier that evening an identical item, (IOW just ONE) sold for way less than HALF what I bid! I would bet money that the seller of the item I bid on made a deal offline to sell them prior to the closing. They intentionally used a high reserve to_______(fill in the blank). Anyhoo, it wasn't something you'dve been after. It wasn't Lark Parts. You definitely could buy a pretty cherry Lark for what these sold for.....But, the example you gave Harks back to my contention that Ebay is definitely is a Sellers' Market.
                  Bottom Line: If someone isn't serious about selling their stuff at an auction, don't list it with an auction. Can't Stand The Heat? Stay Out of the Kitchen! Therefore: Put it in an ad in TW or "Lemmings", or one of the Newsstand Wishbooks and deal with the Looky Loos...simple as that.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Bams old buddy, We see the Irony of Ironies: Everyone is tsk,tsk-ing that guy for putting a reserve that doesn't suit them for that ol' Lark! To Clarify, I didn't "ask the seller what he would take", for the item I bid on, or anything like that! The seller is a very seasoned EBayer with over 4000 transactions, and they have a feedback just a hair over 98%, which tells me that they are um, shrewd. Again: I asked the seller a specific question about the condition of the item and NICELY, and they did not respond. I definitely bid a more than fair price for the item, based upon what the same part # in even better condition has sold for previously. I should mention that these items were being sold as a PAIR having the same part number,BTW, and earlier that evening an identical item, (IOW just ONE) sold for way less than HALF what I bid! I would bet money that the seller of the item I bid on made a deal offline to sell them prior to the closing. They intentionally used a high reserve to_______(fill in the blank). Anyhoo, it wasn't something you'dve been after. It wasn't Lark Parts. You definitely could buy a pretty cherry Lark for what these sold for.....But, the example you gave Harks back to my contention that Ebay is definitely is a Sellers' Market.
                    Bottom Line: If someone isn't serious about selling their stuff at an auction, don't list it with an auction. Can't Stand The Heat? Stay Out of the Kitchen! Therefore: Put it in an ad in TW or "Lemmings", or one of the Newsstand Wishbooks and deal with the Looky Loos...simple as that.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      quote:Originally posted by wally

                      I agree, Dick. My comments were made in jest. But, I am still annoyed about the last Ebay listing I bid on.
                      Wally,
                      I realize you were kidding, and I don't want to beat a dead horse here, but....try the "shoe on the other foot". Say you own a "Studebaker Widget" that you bought for $50 but now have no need for it so you put it on eBay. You figure if you can get your money back, you'll be happy. If not, you are willing to keep it for a while to try again later to sell it OR sell it at another venue. You're not willing to take the chance that it might sell for (a lot) less than what you paid for it (logically)...so you put a RESERVE of $50 on it.

                      Bidding starts. It is bid up to $40 and no further. Does the guy that bid it to $40 have the RIGHT to be angry at you for placing a reserve on it at higher than his bid? Does the buyer have the right to place the ultimate value on the item? In my example, the buyer thought it was worth $40, the seller thought it was worth $50. No sale...simple as that. Happens all the time. In fact, that's how the stock market, the commodities market, and pretty much capitalism works.

                      If the guy REALLY wanted the item, he COULD HAVE bid more. In this example, even if he had bid $75, only the $50 (your reserve) would show, the guy would most likely win the item, and everybody would be happy (we hope )

                      If eBay doesn't work for you, I can understand that. It certainly isn't for everybody...no single store or web site works for everybody. But it does work for some...and work well. It works well for me as both a buyer and a seller. Part of it might be the fact that I don't get angry if my idea of the price of an item (my bid) isn't the same as the seller's idea of the price for the same item (his reserve)...or if another bidder values the item at more than I value it at.


                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        quote:Originally posted by wally

                        I agree, Dick. My comments were made in jest. But, I am still annoyed about the last Ebay listing I bid on.
                        Wally,
                        I realize you were kidding, and I don't want to beat a dead horse here, but....try the "shoe on the other foot". Say you own a "Studebaker Widget" that you bought for $50 but now have no need for it so you put it on eBay. You figure if you can get your money back, you'll be happy. If not, you are willing to keep it for a while to try again later to sell it OR sell it at another venue. You're not willing to take the chance that it might sell for (a lot) less than what you paid for it (logically)...so you put a RESERVE of $50 on it.

                        Bidding starts. It is bid up to $40 and no further. Does the guy that bid it to $40 have the RIGHT to be angry at you for placing a reserve on it at higher than his bid? Does the buyer have the right to place the ultimate value on the item? In my example, the buyer thought it was worth $40, the seller thought it was worth $50. No sale...simple as that. Happens all the time. In fact, that's how the stock market, the commodities market, and pretty much capitalism works.

                        If the guy REALLY wanted the item, he COULD HAVE bid more. In this example, even if he had bid $75, only the $50 (your reserve) would show, the guy would most likely win the item, and everybody would be happy (we hope )

                        If eBay doesn't work for you, I can understand that. It certainly isn't for everybody...no single store or web site works for everybody. But it does work for some...and work well. It works well for me as both a buyer and a seller. Part of it might be the fact that I don't get angry if my idea of the price of an item (my bid) isn't the same as the seller's idea of the price for the same item (his reserve)...or if another bidder values the item at more than I value it at.


                        Dick Steinkamp
                        Bellingham, WA

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I see your point: If someone lists their 398-point Speedster on Ebay, and in the meantime, the entire U.S. has an Earthquake measuring 8.2 on the Richter Scale, they would NOT want some Lucky Dog from say, Holland buying it for a mere $50, simply because potential buyers were preoccupied with a Natural Disaster. THAT, I can understand. What I'm objecting to is sellers going in there and using EBAy to market their parts, and circumventing the process. It is supposed to be an auction.

                          "You Can't Have Everything--Where Would You Put It?" ---comedian Steven Wright

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I see your point: If someone lists their 398-point Speedster on Ebay, and in the meantime, the entire U.S. has an Earthquake measuring 8.2 on the Richter Scale, they would NOT want some Lucky Dog from say, Holland buying it for a mere $50, simply because potential buyers were preoccupied with a Natural Disaster. THAT, I can understand. What I'm objecting to is sellers going in there and using EBAy to market their parts, and circumventing the process. It is supposed to be an auction.

                            "You Can't Have Everything--Where Would You Put It?" ---comedian Steven Wright

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Why does it HAVE to be an auction? It's just a marketplace that sellers try to use to their best advantage- like any other selling tool. Nothing more or less.



                              Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                              Parish, central NY 13131

                              "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that parking is a pleasure, traffic is a breeze, turning's no trick at all, and happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Why does it HAVE to be an auction? It's just a marketplace that sellers try to use to their best advantage- like any other selling tool. Nothing more or less.



                                Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                                Parish, central NY 13131

                                "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that parking is a pleasure, traffic is a breeze, turning's no trick at all, and happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                                Comment

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