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63 Lark Clock...I'm clueless

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  • barnlark
    replied
    Exactly...

    Leave a comment:


  • barnlark
    replied
    Exactly...

    Leave a comment:


  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by barnlark

    I almost tried the AA battery thing, too, seems great; but after talking to that clock repair guy (AA's are kind of blasphemous to him on a vintage clock) and appreciating the inner workings of my Borg clock, it suddenly was like dropping a Toyota engine in my Lark...it might give me less trouble, but.. IMHO some things should have a chance to come back to life properly for a Studebaker, and dash. A working clock is the primary goal, so whatever makes it tick...sorry, lame! Anyway, batteries, quartz, like everything else, whatever makes you and your car happy.
    I think it was GTim that posted about sitting in a quiet garage and hearing the clock tick, then periodically clunk and rewind when the spring winds down and the points close. NOS (Neat Old Sounds). [8D]


    Leave a comment:


  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by barnlark

    I almost tried the AA battery thing, too, seems great; but after talking to that clock repair guy (AA's are kind of blasphemous to him on a vintage clock) and appreciating the inner workings of my Borg clock, it suddenly was like dropping a Toyota engine in my Lark...it might give me less trouble, but.. IMHO some things should have a chance to come back to life properly for a Studebaker, and dash. A working clock is the primary goal, so whatever makes it tick...sorry, lame! Anyway, batteries, quartz, like everything else, whatever makes you and your car happy.
    I think it was GTim that posted about sitting in a quiet garage and hearing the clock tick, then periodically clunk and rewind when the spring winds down and the points close. NOS (Neat Old Sounds). [8D]


    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    I finally installed the NOS clock I bought twenty-five years ago for my '53 last week. A little shot from a 6-volt battery and it ticks its heart out for about four minutes. That's sweet!

    The car's being converted to 12-volt so I installed a voltage drop from Randy Rundle at Fifth Avenue Auto.

    Should be ready to install the dash in the car in a couple weeks.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    I finally installed the NOS clock I bought twenty-five years ago for my '53 last week. A little shot from a 6-volt battery and it ticks its heart out for about four minutes. That's sweet!

    The car's being converted to 12-volt so I installed a voltage drop from Randy Rundle at Fifth Avenue Auto.

    Should be ready to install the dash in the car in a couple weeks.

    Leave a comment:


  • barnlark
    replied
    I almost tried the AA battery thing, too, seems great; but after talking to that clock repair guy (AA's are kind of blasphemous to him on a vintage clock) and appreciating the inner workings of my Borg clock, it suddenly was like dropping a Toyota engine in my Lark...it might give me less trouble, but.. IMHO some things should have a chance to come back to life properly for a Studebaker, and dash. A working clock is the primary goal, so whatever makes it tick...sorry, lame! Anyway, batteries, quartz, like everything else, whatever makes you and your car happy.

    Leave a comment:


  • barnlark
    replied
    I almost tried the AA battery thing, too, seems great; but after talking to that clock repair guy (AA's are kind of blasphemous to him on a vintage clock) and appreciating the inner workings of my Borg clock, it suddenly was like dropping a Toyota engine in my Lark...it might give me less trouble, but.. IMHO some things should have a chance to come back to life properly for a Studebaker, and dash. A working clock is the primary goal, so whatever makes it tick...sorry, lame! Anyway, batteries, quartz, like everything else, whatever makes you and your car happy.

    Leave a comment:


  • 52-fan
    replied
    A fellow I recently talked to converted the clock in his hawk to a battery powered works like people build small clocks with. He just put the new works in using the original face and hands and it looks stock. He said it keeps perfect time and he just pops in a new AA battery once a year. It has the added benefit of not stopping if you disconnect the car's battery.

    1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas

    Leave a comment:


  • 52-fan
    replied
    A fellow I recently talked to converted the clock in his hawk to a battery powered works like people build small clocks with. He just put the new works in using the original face and hands and it looks stock. He said it keeps perfect time and he just pops in a new AA battery once a year. It has the added benefit of not stopping if you disconnect the car's battery.

    1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas

    Leave a comment:


  • tutone63
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by 52-fan

    A fellow I recently talked to converted the clock in his hawk to a battery powered works like people build small clocks with. He just put the new works in using the original face and hands and it looks stock. He said it keeps perfect time and he just pops in a new AA battery once a year. It has the added benefit of not stopping if you disconnect the car's battery.

    1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas
    I have actually considered this possibility before posting. I might do that depending on things.


    She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

    Leave a comment:


  • tutone63
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by 52-fan

    A fellow I recently talked to converted the clock in his hawk to a battery powered works like people build small clocks with. He just put the new works in using the original face and hands and it looks stock. He said it keeps perfect time and he just pops in a new AA battery once a year. It has the added benefit of not stopping if you disconnect the car's battery.

    1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas
    I have actually considered this possibility before posting. I might do that depending on things.


    She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

    Leave a comment:


  • tutone63
    replied
    Thanks guys, Great help. I will have to wait about two weeks before I get a chance to see the guy again and get the clock, (then tear into it) but this is a great place to start!! Much appreciated!! I will keep these links in mind if problems arise.

    Oh, and changing spark plugs for me takes much longer than an hour. It goes like this:
    I get all fired up and get started then lose my spark plug socket.
    I find the socket and in haste pull all of the wires off without labeling them.
    I take off the plugs and throw them away.
    I get the new plugs and realize I need to gap them.
    I can't find my gauge.
    I get them gapped and can't find my torque wrench.
    I find my wrench a day later in a place it should never have been. (usually the trunk of a different car, under the carpet)
    I've lost my socket again.
    I go back, but have forgotten where I put the manual to see how much to torque them.
    When I find that, I realize I did not label my plug wires.
    I figure out where they go, then decide to change them as well.

    Just a day in the life... and my wife wonders why I spend so much time in the garage...


    She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

    Leave a comment:


  • tutone63
    replied
    Thanks guys, Great help. I will have to wait about two weeks before I get a chance to see the guy again and get the clock, (then tear into it) but this is a great place to start!! Much appreciated!! I will keep these links in mind if problems arise.

    Oh, and changing spark plugs for me takes much longer than an hour. It goes like this:
    I get all fired up and get started then lose my spark plug socket.
    I find the socket and in haste pull all of the wires off without labeling them.
    I take off the plugs and throw them away.
    I get the new plugs and realize I need to gap them.
    I can't find my gauge.
    I get them gapped and can't find my torque wrench.
    I find my wrench a day later in a place it should never have been. (usually the trunk of a different car, under the carpet)
    I've lost my socket again.
    I go back, but have forgotten where I put the manual to see how much to torque them.
    When I find that, I realize I did not label my plug wires.
    I figure out where they go, then decide to change them as well.

    Just a day in the life... and my wife wonders why I spend so much time in the garage...


    She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Chucks Stude
    replied
    If yours is too far gone,or if it doesn't want to work, The Clock Works in Eagle River Wi. has parts, does the work, or will convert it to digital. Phone 713-479-5759. Or www.clockwks.com
    Mine was fried. The end bearings wore out, and the shaft fell over, tearing the little wire. Clockworks put it back to right.

    Leave a comment:

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