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  • 63 Lark Clock...I'm clueless

    I was talking to a friend of mine who has a clock for my 63 lark. It looks good with the exception that the chrome ring has a little bit of wear...nothing horrible. It has not been hooked up for who knows how long. He is asking $20. My questions are first:

    Is that a reasonable price? Is it too low? He is a buddy of mine and I would not want to rip him off.

    How difficult would it be to get it running if it doesn't go? I figure it will need some work.

    How difficult would it be to install it? All I have right now in the dash is the dummy plate.

    Could I substitute the chrome ring that is currently in my dash as it is in better shape?

    I know this is a lot of questions...and any help would be much appreciated!! Thanks!


    She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

  • #2
    $20 is a reasonable price. It could bring 2-3 times that on eBay.

    Many old clocks just need the points cleaned up and some oil to work for another 40 years. Here's a good tech article...

    http://www.ncsdc.com/TechnicalPages/ClockRepair.htm

    ...some need more work or can't be fixed at all. Kind of a crap shoot.


    It's not difficult to install, even if you have to fabricate a wiring harness for it. I'd say less than an hour...but then an acquaintance told me recently he was going to change the spark plugs in his Stude. That's maybe an hour's job at the most. When I saw him a week later he told me he had 4 done and was working on the other 4 [:0]. So I guess it depends on your mechanical ability.


    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

    Comment


    • #3
      $20 is a reasonable price. It could bring 2-3 times that on eBay.

      Many old clocks just need the points cleaned up and some oil to work for another 40 years. Here's a good tech article...

      http://www.ncsdc.com/TechnicalPages/ClockRepair.htm

      ...some need more work or can't be fixed at all. Kind of a crap shoot.


      It's not difficult to install, even if you have to fabricate a wiring harness for it. I'd say less than an hour...but then an acquaintance told me recently he was going to change the spark plugs in his Stude. That's maybe an hour's job at the most. When I saw him a week later he told me he had 4 done and was working on the other 4 [:0]. So I guess it depends on your mechanical ability.


      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Comment


      • #4
        The clocks are fairly easy to work on as Dick indicated. My tech-page should tell you all you need to know.
        DO NOT hook it up for "testing" without a proper fuse- you can burn the points quickly, and fry the little wire that goes from the input to the magnetic coil. This makes the repair much more difficult.

        Yes, the dummy plate's ring will work with the clock just fine

        $20 is fine since you are buying "a pig in a poke".... It's not worth $20 if it doesn't work, but worth more than $20 if it does.. You are right in the middle....

        Ray



        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
        Ray

        www.raylinrestoration.com
        Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

        Comment


        • #5
          The clocks are fairly easy to work on as Dick indicated. My tech-page should tell you all you need to know.
          DO NOT hook it up for "testing" without a proper fuse- you can burn the points quickly, and fry the little wire that goes from the input to the magnetic coil. This makes the repair much more difficult.

          Yes, the dummy plate's ring will work with the clock just fine

          $20 is fine since you are buying "a pig in a poke".... It's not worth $20 if it doesn't work, but worth more than $20 if it does.. You are right in the middle....

          Ray



          Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
          Ray

          www.raylinrestoration.com
          Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

          Comment


          • #6
            I took mine apart and it is interesting to watch it all work and satisfying to get it running and cleaned up. Studeman's instructions were very helpful, too. The small ratchet was worn that catches on the main gear, but an ebay seller in Michigan who turned into a friend diagnosed that for me after I had soldered the wire, filed the points and fixed the spring inside and was still stumped. He finds many clocks and repairs them for sale. He has had thousands of clocks and may have what you need now. He really doesn't repair them for people as a job, he does it as a retired hobby for himself. I think $20 is a great price if salvageable and will probably work if taken completely apart and lubed properly.. at the worst. If you want my contact name, email me. Good luck.

            Comment


            • #7
              I took mine apart and it is interesting to watch it all work and satisfying to get it running and cleaned up. Studeman's instructions were very helpful, too. The small ratchet was worn that catches on the main gear, but an ebay seller in Michigan who turned into a friend diagnosed that for me after I had soldered the wire, filed the points and fixed the spring inside and was still stumped. He finds many clocks and repairs them for sale. He has had thousands of clocks and may have what you need now. He really doesn't repair them for people as a job, he does it as a retired hobby for himself. I think $20 is a great price if salvageable and will probably work if taken completely apart and lubed properly.. at the worst. If you want my contact name, email me. Good luck.

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp
                I'd say less than an hour...but then an acquaintance told me recently he was going to change the spark plugs in his Stude. That's maybe an hour's job at the most. When I saw him a week later he told me he had 4 done and was working on the other 4 [:0]. So I guess it depends on your mechanical ability.
                Can definitely take more than an hour to change the plugs on a Stude V8 if you start by say, removing all of the ignition wires first without marking anything... [}]

                <h5>Mark
                '57 Transtar
                3E-6/7-122
                </h5>
                Mark Hayden
                '66 Commander
                Zone Coordinator
                Pacific Can-Am Zone


                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp
                  I'd say less than an hour...but then an acquaintance told me recently he was going to change the spark plugs in his Stude. That's maybe an hour's job at the most. When I saw him a week later he told me he had 4 done and was working on the other 4 [:0]. So I guess it depends on your mechanical ability.
                  Can definitely take more than an hour to change the plugs on a Stude V8 if you start by say, removing all of the ignition wires first without marking anything... [}]

                  <h5>Mark
                  '57 Transtar
                  3E-6/7-122
                  </h5>
                  Mark Hayden
                  '66 Commander
                  Zone Coordinator
                  Pacific Can-Am Zone


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If yours is too far gone,or if it doesn't want to work, The Clock Works in Eagle River Wi. has parts, does the work, or will convert it to digital. Phone 713-479-5759. Or www.clockwks.com
                    Mine was fried. The end bearings wore out, and the shaft fell over, tearing the little wire. Clockworks put it back to right.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If yours is too far gone,or if it doesn't want to work, The Clock Works in Eagle River Wi. has parts, does the work, or will convert it to digital. Phone 713-479-5759. Or www.clockwks.com
                      Mine was fried. The end bearings wore out, and the shaft fell over, tearing the little wire. Clockworks put it back to right.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks guys, Great help. I will have to wait about two weeks before I get a chance to see the guy again and get the clock, (then tear into it) but this is a great place to start!! Much appreciated!! I will keep these links in mind if problems arise.

                        Oh, and changing spark plugs for me takes much longer than an hour. It goes like this:
                        I get all fired up and get started then lose my spark plug socket.
                        I find the socket and in haste pull all of the wires off without labeling them.
                        I take off the plugs and throw them away.
                        I get the new plugs and realize I need to gap them.
                        I can't find my gauge.
                        I get them gapped and can't find my torque wrench.
                        I find my wrench a day later in a place it should never have been. (usually the trunk of a different car, under the carpet)
                        I've lost my socket again.
                        I go back, but have forgotten where I put the manual to see how much to torque them.
                        When I find that, I realize I did not label my plug wires.
                        I figure out where they go, then decide to change them as well.

                        Just a day in the life... and my wife wonders why I spend so much time in the garage...


                        She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks guys, Great help. I will have to wait about two weeks before I get a chance to see the guy again and get the clock, (then tear into it) but this is a great place to start!! Much appreciated!! I will keep these links in mind if problems arise.

                          Oh, and changing spark plugs for me takes much longer than an hour. It goes like this:
                          I get all fired up and get started then lose my spark plug socket.
                          I find the socket and in haste pull all of the wires off without labeling them.
                          I take off the plugs and throw them away.
                          I get the new plugs and realize I need to gap them.
                          I can't find my gauge.
                          I get them gapped and can't find my torque wrench.
                          I find my wrench a day later in a place it should never have been. (usually the trunk of a different car, under the carpet)
                          I've lost my socket again.
                          I go back, but have forgotten where I put the manual to see how much to torque them.
                          When I find that, I realize I did not label my plug wires.
                          I figure out where they go, then decide to change them as well.

                          Just a day in the life... and my wife wonders why I spend so much time in the garage...


                          She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by 52-fan

                            A fellow I recently talked to converted the clock in his hawk to a battery powered works like people build small clocks with. He just put the new works in using the original face and hands and it looks stock. He said it keeps perfect time and he just pops in a new AA battery once a year. It has the added benefit of not stopping if you disconnect the car's battery.

                            1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas
                            I have actually considered this possibility before posting. I might do that depending on things.


                            She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by 52-fan

                              A fellow I recently talked to converted the clock in his hawk to a battery powered works like people build small clocks with. He just put the new works in using the original face and hands and it looks stock. He said it keeps perfect time and he just pops in a new AA battery once a year. It has the added benefit of not stopping if you disconnect the car's battery.

                              1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas
                              I have actually considered this possibility before posting. I might do that depending on things.


                              She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

                              Comment

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