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  • Bob Palma & Dwain G.

    Bob & Dwain - What has been the toughest question you've been asked over the years, by TW readers? Any real stumpers?

    Western Washington, USA

  • #2
    Wow Tom, that's a tough one! I can't think of a specific question, but it would probably have to be one dealing with authenticity. When I volunteered for the column in 1980 I told Bob that I was a third generation Studebaker owner and a career auto mechanic although I had never worked for a Stude dealer, and perhaps didn't have the desired qualifications.
    Sometimes our answers seem to miss the mark because we don't get all of the story from the car owner until later. I'll admit to tiring a little of what I call SBC syndrome, where the owner asks what late model front suspension, rear end, engine and automatic overdrive transmission will bolt into his car with no cutting, welding, or fabrication.
    I really enjoy doing the column, have learned a LOT, and it's been a great excuse to purchase bunches of literature.


    [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/53C.jpg [/img]
    Dwain G.

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow Tom, that's a tough one! I can't think of a specific question, but it would probably have to be one dealing with authenticity. When I volunteered for the column in 1980 I told Bob that I was a third generation Studebaker owner and a career auto mechanic although I had never worked for a Stude dealer, and perhaps didn't have the desired qualifications.
      Sometimes our answers seem to miss the mark because we don't get all of the story from the car owner until later. I'll admit to tiring a little of what I call SBC syndrome, where the owner asks what late model front suspension, rear end, engine and automatic overdrive transmission will bolt into his car with no cutting, welding, or fabrication.
      I really enjoy doing the column, have learned a LOT, and it's been a great excuse to purchase bunches of literature.


      [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/53C.jpg [/img]
      Dwain G.

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by Dwain G.
        When I volunteered for the column in 1980 I told Bob that I was a third generation Studebaker owner and a career auto mechanic although I had never worked for a Stude dealer, and perhaps didn't have the desired qualifications.
        As if! . I think if you look in the dictionary under "Studebaker Expert", Dwain's picture is there [^].

        We missed you in Omaha, Dwain.



        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by Dwain G.
          When I volunteered for the column in 1980 I told Bob that I was a third generation Studebaker owner and a career auto mechanic although I had never worked for a Stude dealer, and perhaps didn't have the desired qualifications.
          As if! . I think if you look in the dictionary under "Studebaker Expert", Dwain's picture is there [^].

          We missed you in Omaha, Dwain.



          Dick Steinkamp
          Bellingham, WA

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you Dick, I missed all of you guys too. It was a last minute decision to stay home, tend to a sick dog, try to get some paint on the house, and save some money.

            [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/53C.jpg [/img]
            Dwain G.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you Dick, I missed all of you guys too. It was a last minute decision to stay home, tend to a sick dog, try to get some paint on the house, and save some money.

              [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/53C.jpg [/img]
              Dwain G.

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by tomnoller

                Bob & Dwain - What has been the toughest question you've been asked over the years, by TW readers? Any real stumpers?

                Western Washington, USA
                Generically, the toughest questions are those that deal with sounds and vibrations. Those items require senses that are difficult to communicate via the written or spoken word. One man's rod bearing knock is another man's timing gear slap, although they both say, "What's the knock in my engine?" [:I]

                As Dwain said, not knowing "the rest of the story" complicates matters. Folks often -'way too often- forget to mention important things...like what type of transmission a car has, or even if it's a six or V-8! (seriously; it has happened!)

                I'd say the biggest problem now is that our Studebakers are so old we can no longer assume anything as to what a member is working on. Virtually all of our vehicles have now been worked on, modified, patched, and often cobbled up by non-Studebaker "mechanics" or other personnel of dubious qualifications. [xx(] When members ask questions about any vehicle, answering is rendered more difficult because we have to try to factor in what might have been done to the vehicle outside normal Studebaker repair procedures, and account for as many variables as we can think of, that may have been introduced since the vehicle was built. [?]

                The flip side of that coin is that everyone says their car is "all original," and, therefore, nobody has introduced any variables since their car was built...and we'd better not suggest anything to the contrary! [}]

                (Just this week, I was forwarded an inquiry from someone with a 1962 Daytona hardtop -bucket seats standard, remember- with a 4-speed. The gentleman insisted it came from the factory with the bench-seat, dog-leg shifter common to 1961 Hawks and 1963-1964 non-bucket seat cars, but was not used on 1962 models. [:0]

                The writer was sure his car was an exception when, in fact, someone probably just tore up the original straight shifter and a dog-leg had been used for a replacement for some reason. We have to be careful answering such inquiries because you don't want to offend anyone and, in fact, the deviation in question might have actually been a factory assembly after all. "Never say never" certainly applies to Studebakers; ask Dick Quinn!)

                The toughest question? Hard to say, but I will say it dealt with either noise or vibration! BP
                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by tomnoller

                  Bob & Dwain - What has been the toughest question you've been asked over the years, by TW readers? Any real stumpers?

                  Western Washington, USA
                  Generically, the toughest questions are those that deal with sounds and vibrations. Those items require senses that are difficult to communicate via the written or spoken word. One man's rod bearing knock is another man's timing gear slap, although they both say, "What's the knock in my engine?" [:I]

                  As Dwain said, not knowing "the rest of the story" complicates matters. Folks often -'way too often- forget to mention important things...like what type of transmission a car has, or even if it's a six or V-8! (seriously; it has happened!)

                  I'd say the biggest problem now is that our Studebakers are so old we can no longer assume anything as to what a member is working on. Virtually all of our vehicles have now been worked on, modified, patched, and often cobbled up by non-Studebaker "mechanics" or other personnel of dubious qualifications. [xx(] When members ask questions about any vehicle, answering is rendered more difficult because we have to try to factor in what might have been done to the vehicle outside normal Studebaker repair procedures, and account for as many variables as we can think of, that may have been introduced since the vehicle was built. [?]

                  The flip side of that coin is that everyone says their car is "all original," and, therefore, nobody has introduced any variables since their car was built...and we'd better not suggest anything to the contrary! [}]

                  (Just this week, I was forwarded an inquiry from someone with a 1962 Daytona hardtop -bucket seats standard, remember- with a 4-speed. The gentleman insisted it came from the factory with the bench-seat, dog-leg shifter common to 1961 Hawks and 1963-1964 non-bucket seat cars, but was not used on 1962 models. [:0]

                  The writer was sure his car was an exception when, in fact, someone probably just tore up the original straight shifter and a dog-leg had been used for a replacement for some reason. We have to be careful answering such inquiries because you don't want to offend anyone and, in fact, the deviation in question might have actually been a factory assembly after all. "Never say never" certainly applies to Studebakers; ask Dick Quinn!)

                  The toughest question? Hard to say, but I will say it dealt with either noise or vibration! BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks guys! Your work is always insightful and shares double star billing with Dick's monthly column, with me. Diagnosing issues by mail just has to be tough, especially when you can't hear or see the patient. Rest assured, even when the advice you give doesn't help the writer, it does help others!

                    Western Washington, USA

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks guys! Your work is always insightful and shares double star billing with Dick's monthly column, with me. Diagnosing issues by mail just has to be tough, especially when you can't hear or see the patient. Rest assured, even when the advice you give doesn't help the writer, it does help others!

                      Western Washington, USA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dwain, I too missed meeting you at Omaha. Bob, I didn't miss you[}] ..... Of course, that's cause you were there.

                        Along the lines of what you guys are talking about, I had someone recently contact me about "the piece that the water pump attaches to" on a Wagonaire. Of course, I sorta deduced that they needed a water pump manifold and so it must be a V8. ( I guess they COULD have needed a OHV6 head!)
                        When we finally worked it out, what they really needed was a thermostat housing. A 4-hole housing no less (not original to a Wagonaire-vintage Stude!) as this particular car had been fitted with aftermarket AC somewhere along the way that must've been scavenged off an earlier vintage Stude.

                        In another instance of late, I answered the phone to find that a fella was seeking a generator for a 1951 Studebaker. I asked which engine it had and he replied that it didn't matter - a generator for a '51 would do.[8]
                        Yet another guy argued with me that his car had brakes for a car of an earlier vintage because Studebaker just bolted on whatever happened to be lying about and certainly someone had found some of the older style brakes and decided to not let them go to waste.[?][?][}]

                        Miscreant adrift in
                        the BerStuda Triangle!!

                        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                        1960 Larkvertible V8
                        1958 Provincial wagon
                        1953 Commander coupe
                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Dwain, I too missed meeting you at Omaha. Bob, I didn't miss you[}] ..... Of course, that's cause you were there.

                          Along the lines of what you guys are talking about, I had someone recently contact me about "the piece that the water pump attaches to" on a Wagonaire. Of course, I sorta deduced that they needed a water pump manifold and so it must be a V8. ( I guess they COULD have needed a OHV6 head!)
                          When we finally worked it out, what they really needed was a thermostat housing. A 4-hole housing no less (not original to a Wagonaire-vintage Stude!) as this particular car had been fitted with aftermarket AC somewhere along the way that must've been scavenged off an earlier vintage Stude.

                          In another instance of late, I answered the phone to find that a fella was seeking a generator for a 1951 Studebaker. I asked which engine it had and he replied that it didn't matter - a generator for a '51 would do.[8]
                          Yet another guy argued with me that his car had brakes for a car of an earlier vintage because Studebaker just bolted on whatever happened to be lying about and certainly someone had found some of the older style brakes and decided to not let them go to waste.[?][?][}]

                          Miscreant adrift in
                          the BerStuda Triangle!!

                          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                          1960 Larkvertible V8
                          1958 Provincial wagon
                          1953 Commander coupe
                          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            At least the Studebakers allow us to troubleshoot with our senses and some reasonable thought.

                            Not so with the newer cars. My wife's 2001 Buick has a tendency to give false alarms such as "gas cap loose" and so far I have resisted the dealership "professional" help and the alarm goes away. The owners manual is not helpful to owner in these cases. The solution is always: Take it to your authorized Buick dealer.

                            Recently we had a warning beep that would go off every five minutes. And ever five minutes the wife would ask "What is that?"and ever five minutes I would answer: "IllbedamnedifIknow."
                            After a few days of this I finally fixed the problem by recharging her cell phone that was in the door pocket.

                            I did save a dealership repair cost and now have a pretty good grasp of what is in the owners manual.

                            Lark Parker
                            aka Trim Trader
                            Frankfort IN
                            sigpic
                            Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              At least the Studebakers allow us to troubleshoot with our senses and some reasonable thought.

                              Not so with the newer cars. My wife's 2001 Buick has a tendency to give false alarms such as "gas cap loose" and so far I have resisted the dealership "professional" help and the alarm goes away. The owners manual is not helpful to owner in these cases. The solution is always: Take it to your authorized Buick dealer.

                              Recently we had a warning beep that would go off every five minutes. And ever five minutes the wife would ask "What is that?"and ever five minutes I would answer: "IllbedamnedifIknow."
                              After a few days of this I finally fixed the problem by recharging her cell phone that was in the door pocket.

                              I did save a dealership repair cost and now have a pretty good grasp of what is in the owners manual.

                              Lark Parker
                              aka Trim Trader
                              Frankfort IN
                              sigpic
                              Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

                              Comment

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