Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Depression photo

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • comatus
    replied
    Those people aren't poor. It's the darn Govt-issue black & white film, obviously just a propaganda technique. When I look over our family photos, everything looks bleak. I still live on the same property, and when I look out the window at the same buildings, it all looks more prosperous somehow. "WWII in Color" on the big-H Channel was a real revelation.

    My dad and I are both retired, so have the luxury of cruising around in pristine unmuddied work trucks. Our more prosperous friends, though, drive splashed-up, dinged up tarred hulks with rust spots and stuff strapped on the racks and make a whole lot of money.

    My mother's family were migrant farm workers before the Crash (and would only wear shoes when they had to). They thought they were doing all right. We're so rich now, we can't remember what "doing all right" used to mean.

    Oh--my generation thinks the Great Depression ended with Prozac.
    Springboard for fogeyism: all through the 50's, we weren't really sure the depression was over. They don't teach that in college.

    Leave a comment:


  • comatus
    replied
    Those people aren't poor. It's the darn Govt-issue black & white film, obviously just a propaganda technique. When I look over our family photos, everything looks bleak. I still live on the same property, and when I look out the window at the same buildings, it all looks more prosperous somehow. "WWII in Color" on the big-H Channel was a real revelation.

    My dad and I are both retired, so have the luxury of cruising around in pristine unmuddied work trucks. Our more prosperous friends, though, drive splashed-up, dinged up tarred hulks with rust spots and stuff strapped on the racks and make a whole lot of money.

    My mother's family were migrant farm workers before the Crash (and would only wear shoes when they had to). They thought they were doing all right. We're so rich now, we can't remember what "doing all right" used to mean.

    Oh--my generation thinks the Great Depression ended with Prozac.
    Springboard for fogeyism: all through the 50's, we weren't really sure the depression was over. They don't teach that in college.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied
    The Great Depression may well have officially over by 1940-41, but in some areas especially the rural South the war effort did not eliminate its effects immediately.

    Great Pictures. In looking at the description of the picture the photo was taken near Near Shawboro, North Carolina. I had never heard of that place, but found that it is the north eastern corner of the state between Elizabeth City and Moyock, North Carolina.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied
    The Great Depression may well have officially over by 1940-41, but in some areas especially the rural South the war effort did not eliminate its effects immediately.

    Great Pictures. In looking at the description of the picture the photo was taken near Near Shawboro, North Carolina. I had never heard of that place, but found that it is the north eastern corner of the state between Elizabeth City and Moyock, North Carolina.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Leave a comment:


  • 56H-Y6
    replied
    Hi Bob
    Starting in 1935 and for eight years, The Resettlement Administration and later the Farm Security Administration had eleven photographers producing a portrait of rural America.
    The photographers are: Arthur Rothstein, Theo Jung, Ben Shahn, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Carl Mydans, Russell Lee, Marion Post Wolcott, Jack Delano, John Vachon, and John Collier.
    Their photographs, in the tens of thousands, document a time so different from ours. Some of the photos have been published and more are available on-line
    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • 56H-Y6
    replied
    Hi Bob
    Starting in 1935 and for eight years, The Resettlement Administration and later the Farm Security Administration had eleven photographers producing a portrait of rural America.
    The photographers are: Arthur Rothstein, Theo Jung, Ben Shahn, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Carl Mydans, Russell Lee, Marion Post Wolcott, Jack Delano, John Vachon, and John Collier.
    Their photographs, in the tens of thousands, document a time so different from ours. Some of the photos have been published and more are available on-line
    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    Bob; No firm date of "The End." Despite the recession in 1938 the year 1937 was generally accepted. As to the depression era images you mention the name Dorothea Lange comes to mind though there were likely others. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_Lange

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review

    Leave a comment:


  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    Bob; No firm date of "The End." Despite the recession in 1938 the year 1937 was generally accepted. As to the depression era images you mention the name Dorothea Lange comes to mind though there were likely others. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_Lange

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by gordr

    Bob, I'm sure you are right.

    I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Well, the young man is maybe 12 years old, max, and the license plate is Florida-1941. So if he is still alive, he'd be about 79 years old; feasible. If that is his sister in the first photo and she is 18, she could be 85 years old now.

    Somewhere, I recently read a biographical sketch of a man who worked for the gov't during the Great Depression, whose assignment was, literally, to travel about the country taking documentary photos such as these...although I agree; I believe The Great Depression was considered over by 1941. (Dick Quinn: As a real historian, what is the generally-accepted end date, or at least year, of The Great Depression?)

    'Can't remember where I read that bigraphical sketch; it may have been in The Purdue Alumnus magazine. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by gordr

    Bob, I'm sure you are right.

    I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Well, the young man is maybe 12 years old, max, and the license plate is Florida-1941. So if he is still alive, he'd be about 79 years old; feasible. If that is his sister in the first photo and she is 18, she could be 85 years old now.

    Somewhere, I recently read a biographical sketch of a man who worked for the gov't during the Great Depression, whose assignment was, literally, to travel about the country taking documentary photos such as these...although I agree; I believe The Great Depression was considered over by 1941. (Dick Quinn: As a real historian, what is the generally-accepted end date, or at least year, of The Great Depression?)

    'Can't remember where I read that bigraphical sketch; it may have been in The Purdue Alumnus magazine. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    Bob; You get an "O" for observation. After I posted it I did a comparison and came to the same conclusion. Thought I would leave it without futher comment to see who would pick up on it.

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review

    Leave a comment:


  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    Bob; You get an "O" for observation. After I posted it I did a comparison and came to the same conclusion. Thought I would leave it without futher comment to see who would pick up on it.

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Bob, I'm sure you are right.

    I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Bob, I'm sure you are right.

    I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel



    Also a 1934 Studebaker. Note the young man with the neck tie and bare feet. Obviously his Sunday go to meetin' clothes where he would see lots of his pals dressed similarly.

    Richard Quinn
    editor: Antique Studebaker Review
    Dick: Isn't this just another view of the subject photo that started this thread? Same Car! Look at the location of the pail on top of the car in both photos, and the stick(?) coming out on top of the left side of it (viewed from drivers position).

    The fellow standing at the rear of the car you reference is the same little guy standing beside the drivers dooor, out aways, in the first photo. [:0] BP

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X