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V8 vs 6 cyl. repentance

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  • #31
    Guess I don't understand the problem some have with sixes. My 50 Starlight scoots around the back roads and easily exceeds the speed limit. I have had it going 75 in overdrive
    on the freeway although it is happier at the 65mph posted limit.
    Regards Renault Dauphine, 38 hp, rear engine, I liked mine so much I repaced it with a new,
    prettier, Renault Caravelle. Sold it after 45,000 miles. Both gave me 40 miles/gallon---wish I had one now. Only gripe on the Renaults was there unit body rusted too easily.
    ...Dick Curtis
    Santa Barbara

    The 1950 Champion Starlight
    Santa Barbara
    CA

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    • #32
      Well, the other thing about the Dauphine was some swing-axle quirk that made it flip real easily. A friend of my mother's (a college boy in 1962) managed to get one on its roof at 25 MPH.

      My first Jeep (a 1953) had the Go-Devil L-head Four. You know, the torque was just great, but I spun a babbit trying to do 55. Most Jeep 8's had just too darn much juice, and it turns out that the ex-Rambler straight six was just right. The Post Office had a jillion Dispatchers, 2WD with the 258, and they'd swap ends on a whim--but in a LWB Wrangler, a CJ with FWD, or a Cherk, the injected ones are superb, last forever, and give respectable economy. It meant a lot more if you started with the Go-Devil.

      "Four liter" is kind of a big six. I guess the complaint with most Stude sixes isn't their sixness or side-valvedness so much as it is a lack of inchiness. I'm not hearing a lot of ill will from 245 Six drivers. I had a Dodge Slant Six (225?) that was just fine, a last-year Stovebolt that actually fetched a museum price, and a Ford 300 Six I really never warmed up to, but not for lack of oomph (-iness). But my two 170 Fords in Econolines were sorry (my neighbor's Falcon 144 was legendarily sorry!), and a Rambler 195 just adequate, in a wagon, to run with early 70's Interstate traffic.

      The 331 Reo Gold Comet six in my 6X6 isn't frail at all--but you're never even tempted to take that one over 50. Not out of motor, mind you--it's the pitch from the M47 short-coupled frame. Not an issue, though. Let them hit you. It's armored.

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      • #33
        Well, the other thing about the Dauphine was some swing-axle quirk that made it flip real easily. A friend of my mother's (a college boy in 1962) managed to get one on its roof at 25 MPH.

        My first Jeep (a 1953) had the Go-Devil L-head Four. You know, the torque was just great, but I spun a babbit trying to do 55. Most Jeep 8's had just too darn much juice, and it turns out that the ex-Rambler straight six was just right. The Post Office had a jillion Dispatchers, 2WD with the 258, and they'd swap ends on a whim--but in a LWB Wrangler, a CJ with FWD, or a Cherk, the injected ones are superb, last forever, and give respectable economy. It meant a lot more if you started with the Go-Devil.

        "Four liter" is kind of a big six. I guess the complaint with most Stude sixes isn't their sixness or side-valvedness so much as it is a lack of inchiness. I'm not hearing a lot of ill will from 245 Six drivers. I had a Dodge Slant Six (225?) that was just fine, a last-year Stovebolt that actually fetched a museum price, and a Ford 300 Six I really never warmed up to, but not for lack of oomph (-iness). But my two 170 Fords in Econolines were sorry (my neighbor's Falcon 144 was legendarily sorry!), and a Rambler 195 just adequate, in a wagon, to run with early 70's Interstate traffic.

        The 331 Reo Gold Comet six in my 6X6 isn't frail at all--but you're never even tempted to take that one over 50. Not out of motor, mind you--it's the pitch from the M47 short-coupled frame. Not an issue, though. Let them hit you. It's armored.

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        • #34
          I love the power of the 8 cylinder in my 1960 Lark VIII convertible even with the 2 speed automatic. The car has great power off the line and can cruise comfortably at 65-70MPH.

          I also have a 1958 BMW Isetta "bubble car" that sports its original 1 cylinder 13 horsepower motorcycle engine coupled to a 4 speed manual. Top speed is about 50MPH but takes a long time to get there. On the other hand I easily get over 40MPG.



          Ready for a trip to the beach!

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          • #35
            I love the power of the 8 cylinder in my 1960 Lark VIII convertible even with the 2 speed automatic. The car has great power off the line and can cruise comfortably at 65-70MPH.

            I also have a 1958 BMW Isetta "bubble car" that sports its original 1 cylinder 13 horsepower motorcycle engine coupled to a 4 speed manual. Top speed is about 50MPH but takes a long time to get there. On the other hand I easily get over 40MPG.



            Ready for a trip to the beach!

            Comment


            • #36
              My first four Studebakers all had V-8s. Then I bought this '54 Champion as a non-running restoration project. I've had a variety of other 6 cylinder cars through the years so I wasn't concerned about this one having a six.

              Well, it definitely could use a little more power, especially in the hilly terrain we have here in Western PA. But most of my driving is backroad cruising and for this it's just fine. And with the OD it runs quietly and smoothly on the open road. I've only had it up to 70 MPH, but it could definitely handle that. I just feel safer keeping it around 55.

              One nice thing about the six is the steering and handling. With the Saginaw manual steering box and the light front end, the car steers and handles beautifully. Much better than the V-8s I had.

              I've considered converting this car to Stude V-8 power, but I just can't bring myself to do it. Eventually, I may try to get some of the power modifications done to the six. Just a little more power would make a big difference in it.

              Dave Bonn
              Valenica, PA
              '54 Champion Starliner

              Comment


              • #37
                My first four Studebakers all had V-8s. Then I bought this '54 Champion as a non-running restoration project. I've had a variety of other 6 cylinder cars through the years so I wasn't concerned about this one having a six.

                Well, it definitely could use a little more power, especially in the hilly terrain we have here in Western PA. But most of my driving is backroad cruising and for this it's just fine. And with the OD it runs quietly and smoothly on the open road. I've only had it up to 70 MPH, but it could definitely handle that. I just feel safer keeping it around 55.

                One nice thing about the six is the steering and handling. With the Saginaw manual steering box and the light front end, the car steers and handles beautifully. Much better than the V-8s I had.

                I've considered converting this car to Stude V-8 power, but I just can't bring myself to do it. Eventually, I may try to get some of the power modifications done to the six. Just a little more power would make a big difference in it.

                Dave Bonn
                Valenica, PA
                '54 Champion Starliner

                Comment

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