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Best Facelifted Studebaker Award - Postwar Years

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  • #61
    My choice is the Lark introduction with the 1959 model year. My second choice would be the 1950 models.

    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #62
      I have to agree with Studegary. The 1958 Studebaker "full-size" whittled down to the 1959 Lark "compact" was the best Studebaker facelift IMHO hand's down.

      Thanks for everyone's two cents. Made a fun thread.

      Studedude961
      --1963 Cruiser

      Comment


      • #63
        I have to agree with Studegary. The 1958 Studebaker "full-size" whittled down to the 1959 Lark "compact" was the best Studebaker facelift IMHO hand's down.

        Thanks for everyone's two cents. Made a fun thread.

        Studedude961
        --1963 Cruiser

        Comment


        • #64
          quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

          I have to agree with Studegary. The 1958 Studebaker "full-size" whittled down to the 1959 Lark "compact" was the best Studebaker facelift IMHO hand's down.

          Thanks for everyone's two cents. Made a fun thread.

          Studedude961
          --1963 Cruiser
          I forgot to add from my above '58 to '59 face lift entry, because it took 8 years from the last one; the '60 convertible. Not the most important, but certainly a face lift. Those and bullet nose convertibles are still pulling the wallets out. Fun thread, indeed. Great idea!

          Comment


          • #65
            quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

            I have to agree with Studegary. The 1958 Studebaker "full-size" whittled down to the 1959 Lark "compact" was the best Studebaker facelift IMHO hand's down.

            Thanks for everyone's two cents. Made a fun thread.

            Studedude961
            --1963 Cruiser
            I forgot to add from my above '58 to '59 face lift entry, because it took 8 years from the last one; the '60 convertible. Not the most important, but certainly a face lift. Those and bullet nose convertibles are still pulling the wallets out. Fun thread, indeed. Great idea!

            Comment


            • #66
              I'll go with the '58 sedans/'59 Larks too...more than a styling change, rather a near-total refocus of Stude's market direction that nonetheless used the bulk of a proven design (and even pitched some of the unchanged aspects--body-on-frame; 15" wheels--as pluses).

              From a sales perspective of course the '49-'50 nosejob was genius...

              And I'd cite Brooks Stevens' lickety split/micro-budget '62s as very clever, too...one kept the classy Hawk (and thus the Starliner) going three years longer; and the other (46 years later, sure) gave me my cherished Lark!

              The '53/4 coupes and HTs are my favourite Studes, but as has been said that wasn't exactly a "facelift", that was Mr Bourke et al penning the prettiest American car of the 50s as a showcar, then somehow getting it into production unmeddled-with...

              Fun thread!

              S.

              Comment


              • #67
                I'll go with the '58 sedans/'59 Larks too...more than a styling change, rather a near-total refocus of Stude's market direction that nonetheless used the bulk of a proven design (and even pitched some of the unchanged aspects--body-on-frame; 15" wheels--as pluses).

                From a sales perspective of course the '49-'50 nosejob was genius...

                And I'd cite Brooks Stevens' lickety split/micro-budget '62s as very clever, too...one kept the classy Hawk (and thus the Starliner) going three years longer; and the other (46 years later, sure) gave me my cherished Lark!

                The '53/4 coupes and HTs are my favourite Studes, but as has been said that wasn't exactly a "facelift", that was Mr Bourke et al penning the prettiest American car of the 50s as a showcar, then somehow getting it into production unmeddled-with...

                Fun thread!

                S.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Well, after reading the previous posts that address this topic, I'm wondering if the topic is being thought of in terms of a SUCCESSFUL facelift. I'm not an authority on Studes, but I was more or less under the impression that the last all-new postwar design for the company was the 1953 models. If that is so, it would seem to me that the 59 Lark would have to be the winner hands-down, because it looks nothing like the previous models, with the possible exception of the roofline.

                  I also think the 1956 models presented a dramatic change in appearance from the 1955's - although maybe not a particularly successful one to some (myself not included - I like them). They would get my vote for second after the 59 Lark. Just an opinion.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Well, after reading the previous posts that address this topic, I'm wondering if the topic is being thought of in terms of a SUCCESSFUL facelift. I'm not an authority on Studes, but I was more or less under the impression that the last all-new postwar design for the company was the 1953 models. If that is so, it would seem to me that the 59 Lark would have to be the winner hands-down, because it looks nothing like the previous models, with the possible exception of the roofline.

                    I also think the 1956 models presented a dramatic change in appearance from the 1955's - although maybe not a particularly successful one to some (myself not included - I like them). They would get my vote for second after the 59 Lark. Just an opinion.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      quote:Well, after reading the previous posts that address this topic, I'm wondering if the topic is being thought of in terms of a SUCCESSFUL facelift. I'm not an authority on Studes, but I was more or less under the impression that the last all-new postwar design for the company was the 1953 models. If that is so, it would seem to me that the 59 Lark would have to be the winner hands-down, because it looks nothing like the previous models, with the possible exception of the roofline.
                      If successful means sales figures, then Bob Palma addressed it.

                      quote:Well, guys; this thread topic is a no-brainer.

                      The object of the company's activities was to sell as many cars as possible in a given model year. If it could be done without making the engineering and tooling investments needed to produce a totally-new model, so much the better.

                      Within those parameters, the 1950 model line wins hands down. Basically unchanged from the cowl back, with few mechanical refinements. The only mechanical item of note being an automatic transmission, sharing "first in the low-price field" with Chevrolet.

                      And when the dust had cleared and the last car had been built in Hamilton, Ontario barely 16 years later, the 1950 Studebaker would prove to be the high-water mark in domestic automobile production for any model year in the company's history. BP
                      Leonard Shepherd
                      http://leonardshepherd.com/

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        quote:Well, after reading the previous posts that address this topic, I'm wondering if the topic is being thought of in terms of a SUCCESSFUL facelift. I'm not an authority on Studes, but I was more or less under the impression that the last all-new postwar design for the company was the 1953 models. If that is so, it would seem to me that the 59 Lark would have to be the winner hands-down, because it looks nothing like the previous models, with the possible exception of the roofline.
                        If successful means sales figures, then Bob Palma addressed it.

                        quote:Well, guys; this thread topic is a no-brainer.

                        The object of the company's activities was to sell as many cars as possible in a given model year. If it could be done without making the engineering and tooling investments needed to produce a totally-new model, so much the better.

                        Within those parameters, the 1950 model line wins hands down. Basically unchanged from the cowl back, with few mechanical refinements. The only mechanical item of note being an automatic transmission, sharing "first in the low-price field" with Chevrolet.

                        And when the dust had cleared and the last car had been built in Hamilton, Ontario barely 16 years later, the 1950 Studebaker would prove to be the high-water mark in domestic automobile production for any model year in the company's history. BP
                        Leonard Shepherd
                        http://leonardshepherd.com/

                        Comment

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