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1965 1966 Stude V8 transmission

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  • #16
    There may not be a bolt there, but the nose of the crank should be threaded. The proper tool should be used to remove and/or install the vibration dampener. Rentable at most major auto parts stores for free.

    my ‘65 and my former owned 66 with original engines , had no threads on either crank
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    Home of the Fried Green Tomato

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    1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
      There may not be a bolt there, but the nose of the crank should be threaded. The proper tool should be used to remove and/or install the vibration dampener.
      Better check on that info, Dick. Most pre-67 SBC cranks were not drilled and tapped for a bolt.
      PackardV8

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      • #18
        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
        Better check on that info, Dick. Most pre-67 SBC cranks were not drilled and tapped for a bolt.
        I've had several early SBCs with the tapped crank. Looks like JR has also. Maybe they made them both ways for some reason?

        I think hammering a vibration dampener on is a bad idea. Is there another method to install the VD if the crank snout isn't threaded?

        EDIT..

        Found this...

        "How about the threaded hole in the crank front snout? Some early crank snouts are not
        drilled or tapped for a vibration damper retention bolt. You can get the snout tapped and threaded for
        the bolt at a machine shop. Also, some early cranks that were used in automatic transmission cars did
        not have a hole drilled in the rear of the crank for a manual transmission pilot bushing."


        About half way down.

        http://www.mre-books.com/chevy/engin...rankshaft.html

        Solves the mystery, but I wonder why?
        Last edited by Dick Steinkamp; 09-11-2019, 11:57 AM.
        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

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        • #19
          In the case of the (presumed early) 283 it wasn't a vibration damper, it was a flange for the pulley. I guess we would need to ask the guy who struggled to remove the flange if it was stable enough. My wife had a similar method on her 3.5 Dodge Intrepid. But it does beg the question about timing mark accuracy if there is no keyway like the Dodge had.

          The absence of a place for the manual pilot bushing comment is interesting because the GM auto trans convertor needs somewhere for the snout to go. And that opening should be large enough to install a pilot bushing. Perhaps it wasn't deep enough for the input shaft on the manual trans?
          '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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          • #20
            Its kind of funny how (for so many years) it was hammered into my head that SBC's were the end-all, be-all engines of all time because everything on them was interchangeable, especially compared to the series of small block Furd engines. Any one could take any SBC and interchange any part and build anything they wanted. Then in 1968 (or 67, or does it really matter) GM went and changed the journal size, and then it all went to hell with the intro of the dang 400 with those siamesed bores, steam vents and external balancing. Now 5 decades later we're just a bunch of old (and semi-old) farts hanging out and gumming-on about the differences in crankshafts. After doing some snooping around on Chubby forums yesterday I learned that some 283 cranks don't fit in some 283 blocks...go figure! So the good ole pre '68 SBC was not as interchangeable as I was taught...how horrible. Perhaps we should start another thread and debate if the McKinnon 283 was the same as the Chevy 283 and start rehashing all that (no, not really, just kidding).

            For trivia's sake only, I would sure like to see a photo of factory sbc crank without a pilot bearing hole.

            Oh, and I'm still certain that the pulley flange on my 283 is a slip-fit affair that requires no tools to remove or install on the crank snout, but I'm not going out to the garage and pulling it apart to confirm if my memory serves or not. cheers, junior
            sigpic
            1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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            • #21
              So a lot of interesting stuff since I first started this post. I've learned the following since installing the 283 into my '55. It was supposedly removed from a '65 Stude and rebuilt some years ago. The block casting number indicates a '58-61 era block, the head numbers correspond to Canadian built heads for the '65 Studebaker. From this thread I now know the drilled steel bushing at the rear of the crank was for the Stude automatic trans (BW?). The crank nose had a flange for a pulley, pressed on utilizing a key-way. The crank nose was drilled and tapped. I replaced the flange with a Chev vibration damper that is pressed on, I used a crank bolt to seat it but have removed it since (to mount a crank pulley). Both the bushing and the flange were a bear to remove. Once the bushing was removed I was able to press a pilot bushing into an existing hole. The engine has been started but the 4GC 4 barrel (I rebuilt) has issues. Have purchased a professionally rebuilt 4GC. Which brings up another question - several carburetor rebuilding info sheets I've seen list kits and tune-up specs for a '65 Stude Rochester 4GC. So Stude had a four barrel option for '65? Obviously, I am using one anyway.
              Toby Knoll Garage

              www.tobyknollgarage.com
              ______

              '51 Muntz Jet
              '53 Woodill Wildfire/Dodge
              '54 Hudson Hornet Grand National Tribute car
              '55 Studebaker Speedster/Cadillac
              '56 Corvette SR replica

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              • #22
                The Chev V8 crank was not threaded originally. I don't know when the factory started threading them, but the damper coming loose and falling off was common enough that all the tool makers (like Lisle for one) had kits containing tools to thread the snout and a bolt to install.
                https://www.12bolt.com/store/p164/Cr...-194-Tool.html
                Last edited by Dwain G.; 10-10-2019, 03:55 PM.

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                • #23
                  Interesting, I used a bolt to tighten the damper but because the damper opening required a large washer, which eliminated the ability to mount a crank pulley. So once fully seated, I removed the bolt from the damper. We'll see if the damper stays or strays.
                  Toby Knoll Garage

                  www.tobyknollgarage.com
                  ______

                  '51 Muntz Jet
                  '53 Woodill Wildfire/Dodge
                  '54 Hudson Hornet Grand National Tribute car
                  '55 Studebaker Speedster/Cadillac
                  '56 Corvette SR replica

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by vetteson View Post
                    Interesting, I used a bolt to tighten the damper but because the damper opening required a large washer, which eliminated the ability to mount a crank pulley. So once fully seated, I removed the bolt from the damper. We'll see if the damper stays or strays.
                    The crank bolt and crank bolt washer are installed AFTER the pulley (or pulleys) are bolted onto the balancer with the appropriate length 3/8-24 bolts.
                    Jerry Forrester
                    Forrester's Chrome
                    Douglasville, Georgia

                    See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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