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1965 1966 Stude V8 transmission

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  • 1965 1966 Stude V8 transmission

    Did all '65-66 V8 (283) Studebakers have an automatic transmission?
    Toby Knoll Garage

    www.tobyknollgarage.com
    ______

    '51 Muntz Jet
    '53 Woodill Wildfire/Dodge
    '54 Hudson Hornet Grand National Tribute car
    '55 Studebaker Speedster/Cadillac
    '56 Corvette SR replica


  • #2
    IIRC, the 3-speed manual T86, with and without overdrive was standard. The Borg-Warner 3-speed automatic was the option. Also, the T90 floor shift 3-speed was a taxi option.

    Just a bit of trivia, but in '65-'66 Corvettes were still getting the 2-speed Powerglide transmission.

    jack vines
    Last edited by PackardV8; 09-09-2019, 10:10 AM.
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      No. You could get a column shift 3 spd with or w/out OD.

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      • #4
        I recently purchased a McKinnon 283 V8 that was what '65-66 Stude's used. A different crankshaft was apparently used (steel) and the rear flange has no provision for a pilot bearing, it has a round plate pressed in instead. There is a center hole but it is too small for a bearing and does not have a bearing surface. Also, the front nose has a flange for a non-regular chevy bolt-on damper.
        Toby Knoll Garage

        www.tobyknollgarage.com
        ______

        '51 Muntz Jet
        '53 Woodill Wildfire/Dodge
        '54 Hudson Hornet Grand National Tribute car
        '55 Studebaker Speedster/Cadillac
        '56 Corvette SR replica

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        • #5
          Originally posted by vetteson View Post
          I recently purchased a McKinnon 283 V8 that was what '65-66 Stude's used. A different crankshaft was apparently used (steel) and the rear flange has no provision for a pilot bearing, it has a round plate pressed in instead. There is a center hole but it is too small for a bearing and does not have a bearing surface. Also, the front nose has a flange for a non-regular chevy bolt-on damper.
          Most 283" SBC crankshafts were forged steel, but in the '65-'66 period, Chevrolet began to use cast crankshafts. They are usually found in a few late 1965s and many Chevy II and Chevelles in '66-'67 . Forged crank 283"s were still made during this period, but most of them were used in trucks.

          Is the nose of the crankshaft drilled and tapped for a center bolt? Most 283"s were not.

          jack vines
          Last edited by PackardV8; 09-09-2019, 12:56 PM.
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            So is the McKinnon/Studebaker, Pontiac/Truck 283 Engine a problem to install in a Chev.?
            I guess that is what you are doing?
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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            • #7
              No, I am (was) considering putting the engine into my '55 Speedster, which has a GM 4 sp OD already installed.
              Toby Knoll Garage

              www.tobyknollgarage.com
              ______

              '51 Muntz Jet
              '53 Woodill Wildfire/Dodge
              '54 Hudson Hornet Grand National Tribute car
              '55 Studebaker Speedster/Cadillac
              '56 Corvette SR replica

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by vetteson View Post
                I recently purchased a McKinnon 283 V8 that was what '65-66 Stude's used. A different crankshaft was apparently used (steel) and the rear flange has no provision for a pilot bearing, it has a round plate pressed in instead. There is a center hole but it is too small for a bearing and does not have a bearing surface. Also, the front nose has a flange for a non-regular chevy bolt-on damper.
                can you get some photos...? Is the hole in the back of the crank large enough for a bushing...not a bearing? Studebaker 283's used a flange that the pulley(s) bolt to with (I think)3 bolts but did not use a balancer, not even the skinny small ones from the 327's. Its been a long time, but I thought those flanges slid onto the crank and were held on by a center bolt...but according to Jack V, there were no center bolts so then were the flanges pressed on? What I'd like to know more about is the round steel plate pressed in the rear of the crank. cheers, junior
                sigpic
                1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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                • #9
                  You DO have to wonder if this thing is all Original Stude. or did someone try to Chevy-ise it?
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                  • #10
                    My car had the McKinnon 283 transplant with the B/W A-12 Auto trans. There was a pilot bearing to deal with the smaller centering hub on the the convertor. In essence it wasn't really a bearing, rather it was more of a reducer since the convertor hub didn't spin in it. If you look at the picture of the transmission you can see the bearing (reducer) wired on one of the mounting holes on the left as well as in the rear of the crank. FWIW I used the 65-66 era flex plate on an '85 SBC and used that to connect to a '92 700R4 transmission.

                    The third picture shows the front of the crank, and no, there is not a typical damper.

                    So, while it isn't 100% confirmation:

                    1. the McKinnon 283 used a bearing/reducer that is removable like any pilot bearing

                    2. the 65/66 era flex plate fit the '85 crank and given the inner ID of the plate there likely isn't any change in the years (at least 65 to 85) to the opening for the GM convertor shout.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by wittsend; 09-09-2019, 07:48 PM.
                    '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wittsend View Post
                      My car had the McKinnon 283 transplant with the B/W A-12 Auto trans. There was a pilot bearing to deal with the smaller centering hub on the the convertor. In essence it wasn't really a bearing, rather it was more of a reducer since the convertor hub didn't spin in it. If you look at the picture of the transmission you can see the bearing (reducer) wired on one of the mounting holes on the left as well as in the rear of the crank. FWIW I used the 65-66 era flex plate on an '85 SBC and used that to connect to a '92 700R4 transmission.

                      The third picture shows the front of the crank, and no, there is not a typical damper.

                      So, while it isn't 100% confirmation:

                      1. the McKinnon 283 used a bearing/reducer that is removable like any pilot bearing

                      2. the 65/66 era flex plate fit the '85 crank and given the inner ID of the plate there likely isn't any change in the years (at least 65 to 85) to the opening for the GM convertor shout.
                      How it the pulley hub held on to the crankshaft? Thanks, junior
                      sigpic
                      1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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                      • #12
                        Junior,
                        Frankly I didn't know. I sold the engine as you see it sitting there complete with block heaters. However, I was curious with your question and found this short You Tube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZA1EV9qlzHE showing it is a press fit. Mystery solved???
                        '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                        • #13
                          If the engine is an original 65 or 66 from a Studebaker it has no front bolt holding the front hub on the crank ....those hubs are just drove on with a block of wood and a hammer .
                          sigpic

                          Home of the Fried Green Tomato

                          "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

                          1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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                          • #14
                            I looked at the 283 in my car today and it has a bolt in the center of the crankshaft which I assume is holding the hub onto the crank. I have lost track of which year of 283 is in the car but it is either a '59, or '63. hmmm. This crank was attached to an auto trans, but when I converted to manual trans there was no problem installing a pilot bushing in it as the crank was bored for one. cheers, junior
                            sigpic
                            1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 2R5 View Post
                              If the engine is an original 65 or 66 from a Studebaker it has no front bolt holding the front hub on the crank ....those hubs are just drove on with a block of wood and a hammer .
                              There may not be a bolt there, but the nose of the crank should be threaded. The proper tool should be used to remove and/or install the vibration dampener. Rentable at most major auto parts stores for free.



                              Dick Steinkamp
                              Bellingham, WA

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