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beautiful '35 President roadster first time shown at Orphan show in Branson

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  • beautiful '35 President roadster first time shown at Orphan show in Branson

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xHhVCXpZvA Owned by Larry Boyer of San Angelo will be shown in Mansfield next week
    Barry'd in Studes

  • #2
    An excellent restoration of a top of the line car.
    To me, it appears to be a convertible, not a "roadster".
    I see a couple of Plymouths in the background. It is hard for me to thnk of them as orphans. The brand no longer exists, but the manufacturer still does.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by studegary View Post
      The brand no longer exists, but the manufacturer still does.
      Sort of. Fiat is the head of the operation based in Italy. How much longer do you think the letter 'C' will remain in the initials, 'FCA'?

      Craig

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
        Sort of. Fiat is the head of the operation based in Italy. How much longer do you think the letter 'C' will remain in the initials, 'FCA'?

        Craig
        Not long, but it is there today. I expect Chrysler and Dodge models to go away, leaving Jeep and Ram.
        I thought that FCA was a corporation somewhere else, like the Netherlands. Of course, some of their "operation" is in Italy as well as several other countries.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by studegary View Post
          Not long, but it is there today. I expect Chrysler and Dodge models to go away, leaving Jeep and Ram.
          I thought that FCA was a corporation somewhere else, like the Netherlands. Of course, some of their "operation" is in Italy as well as several other countries.
          Some sources say The Netherlands, and others say London, England, but the Agnelli family in Italy is still their major shareholder. I guess whichever country provides the best tax shelter for a major corporation is where they'll make their world HQ.

          Craig

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          • #6
            Here is a before photo with owner.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              And Photos of other 35 presidents. Mine is the black one restored / detailed correctly.
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                A rather tasty model, this '35 President! Would this have been made to compete in the "almost-luxury" sector of Buick, Chrysler et all?
                Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

                1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

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                • #9
                  My favorite 1935 Studebaker parade photos in South Bend. Only one President, leading the parade.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't think so Jake, it was definitely in the Packard, Cadillac and Lincoln "Class".
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                      I don't think so Jake, it was definitely in the Packard, Cadillac and Lincoln "Class".
                      I'm more inclined to agree with Jake. I agree with you for appearance and interior appointments, but Studebaker never offered a V12 as the above cars did, which more or less kept it out of the full-luxury class. Perhaps it was intentional as they owned Pierce Arrow just before which offered a V12, and didn't want any product overlap if they didn't have to divest themselves of it in order to raise cash to pull the corporation out of receivership.

                      Craig
                      Last edited by 8E45E; 09-08-2019, 12:36 PM.

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                      • #12
                        A beautiful car indeed.
                        This was a rare meet for me in several ways. I rarely am seen in pictures because I am taking them, but this is the second video today that has me in it. The man in the orange shirt talking to Joe, Barry, and I was someone who just happened to be staying at the motel and was interested.
                        sigpic

                        "In the heart of Arkansas."
                        Searcy, Arkansas
                        1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                        1952 2R pickup

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                        • #13
                          The before restoration picture of the car and the other pictures show the horns facing straight forward, but they are not that way on the restored car.
                          Gary L.
                          Wappinger, NY

                          SDC member since 1968
                          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree with Jake and Craig, regarding the market for this car. From 1928 on Studebaker/Pierce Arrow's luxury marque was the PA and Studebaker wanted to maintain that air of exclusivity. Bankruptcy protection with PA's sale in 1933 and the demise of the big President that year, completely changed the company and it's offerings. Never again would the company offer a car that would compete with, or be considered in, the upper reaches of the cars that we would later call "Classic."

                            It' always seemed remarkable to me that the Big Three were willing to sustain the losses as a result of the depressed sales of their most expensive luxury models (Cadillac,Lincoln and Imperial). I have little doubt that they lost money on every one they produced, as they tried valiantly to hold onto their reputation.

                            IMO the market that 1935 Studebaker President convertible coupe had to compete with had recently been turned upside down by the success of two cars, the first Cadillac's companion car, the LaSalle, but maybe more importantly Packard's 120. The 120 had the same lines as the senior series cars, and it too had a straight eight engine. What set the Packard apart from all of it's competition was it's price. At $1095 it was $230 less then the $1325 for Studebaker we are discussing. Packard's production of just over 6K in 1934, rebounded in 1935 to just over 52K in 1935. Virtually all if the increase was due to the sales of the new 120. The upshot was that it basically destroyed the competition! 20% less for a Packard, that most of the world believe was a superior car. I'd call that a no brainier, I know what I would have bought. So "compete" may be too strong a word for what the President was up against. Thank God for the Dictator!

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                            • #15
                              Thanks to whoever took their time to walk slowly and capture lots of the details of the car. Now if they could do a video of a '32 Commander....

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