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  • #61
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    That's neat, and NOW you can add: Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Plymouth and Mercury, with Chrysler, Lincoln and Dodge hanging by a thread!

    Since "Rams" are no longer Dodges, they and Jeep are almost the lone survivors of Fiat/Chrysler.
    Definitely a lot has happened in the car industry since 1976, when that second volume of Tad Burness's "Auto Album" compilation was published which had the 'Far Out' 1950 Studebaker inside. I was fortunate enough to find that copy at a swap meet one year, as I have Volume 1, which I got when I was still in school in 1969. (The Auto Album series was distributed by Scholastic Book Services in schools.)

    I just found it highly coincidental Jake made nearly the exact same comment as Tad Burness made some 45 years earlier, and referred to 'young people' as the ones wanting them for transportation. I doubt Jake saw this before I posted it. Unfortunately, Tad Burness passed away in 2012.

    Craig

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    • #62
      Jake

      Automotive styling from prior eras will always be considered "ugly" or outlandish to some not familiar with the context of the times. Those cars that are widely held up as the prettiest of the era were to begin with very middle-of-the-road, grand-but-bland styling jobs. They were intended to appeal to the broadest audience while offending the fewest possible. For the independent makers, presenting distinctive styling was a way to stand out from the crowd, otherwise they would attract little attention at all.

      Noting your interest in the 'bathtub' 1948-50 Packards with Free-Flow Styling, as along as your don't have to have a convertible or one of the top-line Custom Eights, good examples at reasonable prices are readily available. Those were among the highest volume years and the survival rate is quite good. Mechanically, they tend to be pretty robust, even the Ultramatic is when set up correctly and driven reasonably. I recommend you visit PackardInfo.com frequently where we highlight worthwhile Packard available on current Craiglist via the 'Various CL Pickings" topic. When Packards appear in upcoming auction sales, those are also posted as well.

      Steve

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      • #63
        The 1953 had such a good looking front that even Studebaker's low priced Champion 2 door sedan would be nice to own.
        https://worcester.craigslist.org/ctd...951312886.html

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        • #64
          Personally, I like things that are not the mainstream stuff. I'm not Joe-average or Joe-exceptional either, as I tend to be considered by others as Joe-different or Joe the odd one. If I had more money, most people would call me Joe-weird or Joe-crazy, because some of my ideas are waaaay outside the box. Being different and seeing things from another perspective defined my career and successes.

          My automotive age of enlightenment came in 1953 by way of Tom McCahill (Mechanix Illustrated) and the new Corvette at the showroom on my paper route. It didn't take long to discover the '53-'54 Studebakers and the lure of Bonneville and drag racing. Fast forwarding to late '65 it was time to build a dedicated drag car, after years of racing daily drivers, including my new GTO. Remembering that Bill Ehrsam held the NHRA record with his '51 Stude and that coupled with my lust for oddities, made Studebakers my first choice. I found a '52 that started me down the off-brand rabbit hole and eventually held several AHRA records with one. Supported by funds from my side business, the "so ugly, it's cute", Aardvark Engineering name fit appropriately. I even used my '64 GT Hawk as a tow car one season, which was a large visual differential going down the highway.

          I've told my kids that daring to being different is desirable, as long as it fits inside the limits of our society. It's how humans advanced beyond hunting and gathering.

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          • #65
            First car I ever desired was my neighbors Maui Blue '51 Commander Starlight V-8 coupe, which more than any other, has kept my Studebaker passion burning for over 60 years. Have now owned over a dozen Studebaker's, but a 'bullet nose' is still an unfulfilled dream.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by 56H-Y6 View Post
              Jake

              Automotive styling from prior eras will always be considered "ugly" or outlandish to some not familiar with the context of the times. Those cars that are widely held up as the prettiest of the era were to begin with very middle-of-the-road, grand-but-bland styling jobs. They were intended to appeal to the broadest audience while offending the fewest possible. For the independent makers, presenting distinctive styling was a way to stand out from the crowd, otherwise they would attract little attention at all.

              Noting your interest in the 'bathtub' 1948-50 Packards with Free-Flow Styling, as along as your don't have to have a convertible or one of the top-line Custom Eights, good examples at reasonable prices are readily available. Those were among the highest volume years and the survival rate is quite good. Mechanically, they tend to be pretty robust, even the Ultramatic is when set up correctly and driven reasonably. I recommend you visit PackardInfo.com frequently where we highlight worthwhile Packard available on current Craiglist via the 'Various CL Pickings" topic. When Packards appear in upcoming auction sales, those are also posted as well.

              Steve
              Received and acknowledged, Steve! Thank you for directing me to that Packard source. Needless to say I'll be using it quite often.

              Also, I fully understand the position that the Independents were in immediately following WWII. If they did not wow the crowd with off-beat styling and exceptional build quality, they were toast and they knew it. That was just the rules of the game back then.
              Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

              1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

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              • #67
                1) If you think the '59-60 Larks are ugly, then take a look at the front end of a new Rolls Royce. I think the '59-60 Larks are well styled, albeit a bit stubby.
                2) The '53-54 C & K coupes were/are beautiful. They didn't win styling awards for nothing, and they are always in any list of most beautiful cars (car mags' surveys of readers and designers). The C & Ks that followed lost something with the fins and chrome as Studebaker tried to keep up with styling trends with a limited budget. But, they were always beautiful from some angles. The G.T. Hawks are beautiful from most angles, a bit awkward from a few angles.
                3) The Avanti is a beautiful car, although a bit plump in the rear roof area, like a Jaguar E-type 2+2. It almost has no non-beautiful angles.
                Just my humble opinion, and that is how it is with most art. But, if there were no consensus, then Van Gogh paintings wouldn't be worth millions and my paintings worth nothing.
                -Dwight

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                • #68
                  Forum administrator:
                  I submitted my 2 cents worth yesterday, and I am shown on the listing of General Studebaker-Related Topics (one page back), and yet it is not on here. Why is that? When I was developing software for DoD we called bugs like this "undocumented features." This has happened before. I guess I'll have to keep a copy of my submission to re-enter in these cases.
                  -Dwight

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by j.byrd View Post
                    Bob P. and Craig..... the Aztec had always been No. 1 on many lists ( mine included ) for ugly, but have you guys seen the new Lexus "things" with the expanded/distorted 61 Plymouth grille completely destroying the entire front end ? That pug-ugly thing surely will knock the Aztec out of No. 1, ha !
                    Your right, I think the Lexus designer was scared by an electric razor. My dear wife who cares nothing about cars except that they take her shopping, always comments, saying "that's an ugly car".
                    Murray
                    Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain !

                    http://sites.google.com/site/intrigu...tivehistories/

                    (/url) https://goo.gl/photos/ABBDQLgZk9DyJGgr5

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