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Studebaker Indy car #37 to be auctioned Aug. 16-17

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  • #16
    Is this the first time that a Stude Indy car has ever been offered for sale on the public market?

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    • #17
      Brook Stevens had one. It was loaned to the Studebaker National Museum in 1990 when we did the Great American Race. The theme was "South bend goes racing". It was to be ran every 30 days. Got to drive it around the parking lot. It was sold when Brook Stevens museum was closed. It is some where in the Midwest.

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      • #18
        My guesstimate was $200K to $300K, but you never know what might happen in an auction where two rich people both want something.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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        • #19
          The car that DieselJim refers to is the white #34 car which wears a 1933-style body.
          Here’s a page about the car: https://tomstrongman.com/1933-studebaker-indy-car/
          In 1932, that chassis had a silver-painted body (like #37) and ran as #25.

          Matt may be right that #37 will be the first Studebaker Indy car to be sold in an open market. I’m guessing it will go for about $250 K. It would be a pleasant surprise if the price turns out to be higher.
          Gary Ash
          Dartmouth, Mass.

          '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
          ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
          '48 M5
          '65 Wagonaire Commander
          '63 Wagonaire Standard
          web site at http://www.studegarage.com

          Comment


          • #20
            A correction re the number of cars entered by Studebaker in 1932 and 1933 at the "500", there were 5. Car #37 (the Valpey car) was owned by Ab Jenkins but considered part of the team. It ran as an independent in '31 as the Hunt Jenkins Special. It was driven by Tony Gulotta and was ahead of every other car on the track with only 33 laps to go but was wrecked as victory seemed almost assured. It won the Pike's Peak Hill Climb also in 1931 (driven by Chuck Myers) and set a new record in the unlimited class. In 1932, still numbered #37 it was driven by Zeke Myer to a 6th place finish. In 1933 Studebaker used new aerodynamic bodies on its four cars but the Jenkins car (now #47) got a new radiator shell but used the old '32 body (see attachment #2). It was driven by L. L. "Slim" Corum to a 12th pace finish.

            Bob Valpey was a friend of mine and I had a ride in #37 through the streets of South Bend back in '02. Since Bob's passing I have been in touch with Alice (Bob's wife) and also Stan Smith of PA who restored the car back in the 70s. My input was in re to assisting to confirm the cars authenticity esp the engine. I too would have loved to have seen the car go to the Studebaker National Museum but that decision has been made and no value in second guessing that as we do not know all the details that went into the decision. Likewise with projecting a selling price as that too is idle speculation and will play itself out in a few months, then we will all know.

            Incidentally I recently completed an article for the magazine Collectible Automobile that will be out in early August (the October issue). Entitled "An Exacting Test: Studebaker at Indianapolis in the Thirties," it is twelve pages in length, approx. 5500 words with over 30 photos.

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            Last edited by Studebaker Wheel; 06-24-2019, 11:03 PM.
            Richard Quinn
            Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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            • #21
              Dick, thanks for more of the history on these cars. Looks like the October issue of Collectible Automobile is going to be a "must have" issue.
              sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

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              • #22
                Question for the search guru's..

                Weren't these the Studebaker Indy cars that Clarence "Kelly" Johnson did some of his college wind tunnel aerodynamic work on?
                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                • #23
                  I’m dusting some cobwebs from my brain but I was thinking one of the Indy cars went down, sunk, on a transport ship somewhere between South America and the US?? Anybody out there that can realign my memory bank

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                    Question for the search guru's..

                    Weren't these the Studebaker Indy cars that Clarence "Kelly" Johnson did some of his college wind tunnel aerodynamic work on?
                    The article Gary linked above about the #34 1933-configuration car states, "Over time, four of the other 1933s had their bodies changed, making the Grasis car the only one to still wear the high-cowl, aerodynamically efficient body that was developed in the University of Michigan wind tunnel." An online biography of Johnson mentions that "he picked up small teaching fellowships and augmenting his income by renting the University's wind tunnel to run tests as a consultant on models of Indianapolis racing cars".

                    The average qualifying speeds for the 1933 Studebaker Indy cars was 112.2mph, an increase of 1.7mph over the same 5 cars in their 1932 configurations. Although I like the lines of the 1932 cars better, that wind tunnel work obviously paid dividends in 1933.

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                    • #25
                      Many other changes were made between 1932 and '33 so difficult to say which played a part in the better times. Even the drivers preferred the '32 bodies! Incidentally there is another surviving car with a '33 body. In Calif. Been under restoration for years. Long story.
                      Richard Quinn
                      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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                      • #26
                        I always thought the '33 bodies appeared quite ungainly; more like hippos than dolphins. And, of course, the '31-'32 grill is sublime.

                        Don has just posted on another thread that the Board of Trustees of the Museum have voted to pursue the purchase of the Valpey car.
                        They are not asking for money at this point but, if you would like to see it go to the Museum they would appreciate a pledge.

                        https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....baker-indy-car
                        Last edited by rockne10; 06-26-2019, 12:15 PM.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
                          Most of the offenhauser roadsters from the fifties go for from 175 to 300. 500K seems a lot to me, but I couldn't afford 175K either in any case.
                          Old Indy roadster values can be strange -

                          A Watson roadster with no special history, but fully restored, brought $577K at Southeby's
                          https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/A...oadster/180154

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                          • #28
                            I believe that the rumor of one of the Indy cars being lost on a sunk ship bound for South America is just a rumor. One car did go to South Africa, where it was later scrapped after 1959, the body and chassis tossed away. The engine survived to be installed in 1928 President 7-passenger sedan. This car was recently purchased by a knowledgable Studebaker collector who knows what to do with the engine.

                            The “South America” legend came about because a key Studebaker employee saw “SA” on some documents and interpreted it as South America.

                            The provenance of all the Studebaker Indy cars is known and documented - save one! Car #46 is a mystery. After the company sold it, it disappeared from records. There is a #46 now in Switzerland, but it is (mostly) a replica built by a crew at the Indy Speedway Museum in the early 1980s using #22 as a model. There is no known documentation linking the current #46 to the original. That said, the current #46 is a good copy and is raced in Europe. There are some good YouTube videos of it in action.
                            Gary Ash
                            Dartmouth, Mass.

                            '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                            ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                            '48 M5
                            '65 Wagonaire Commander
                            '63 Wagonaire Standard
                            web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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