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  • StudeRich
    replied
    There USED to be a SDC Chapter in the Ventura County Area around Santa Barbara!

    It would be Great to get one going again.

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  • Edsel Face
    replied
    Congratulations! I estimate the population between Monterey and Santa Barbara to be 300,000 400,000. Maybe someone could research the roster to see if there are enough members residing in this area to warrant forming a chapter.

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  • 6hk71400
    replied
    Originally posted by Edsel Face View Post
    I am located near San Luis Obispo, in Nipomo. 90 miles north of Santa Barbara. The central coast could be defined as being from Monterey extending south to Santa Barbara. Unfortunately there is no SDC chapter in this area. I did send an e mail to the Bakersfield chapter president asking if any members had a '50 or '51 Champion that I might take a ride in, but I never got a reply.
    William,

    I have a 2018 Membership roster and I can email some folks in the area that may have the models listed you want to "test drive or ride". I will work on this on Monday. Jenny and I are celebrating our 39th Wedding Anniversary this weekend. Hopefully someone will respond to my emails.

    Bob Miles
    Pacific Southwest Zone Coordinator

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  • Edsel Face
    replied
    I am located near San Luis Obispo, in Nipomo. 90 miles north of Santa Barbara. The central coast could be defined as being from Monterey extending south to Santa Barbara. Unfortunately there is no SDC chapter in this area. I did send an e mail to the Bakersfield chapter president asking if any members had a '50 or '51 Champion that I might take a ride in, but I never got a reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6hk71400
    replied
    William,

    If you could narrow it down to your vicinity, I can make some contacts in the area to help you out. Central as in Palm Springs, Bakersfield, or other areas. I can make some contacts but I don't know California Geography other than LA and San Diego.

    Bob Miles
    Pacific Southwest Zone Coordinator

    Leave a comment:


  • Edsel Face
    replied
    Well.... is there anyone CLOSE to area code 805, Calif. central coast, who could give me a tutorial and a ride in their 1950 or '51 Champion?

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    The real question appears to be Which year model car is this?

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Yes, I agree about the automatic and overdrive. A couple years ago there was a near mint 1950 Commander automatic for $10,000 about 50 miles from me. I thought about it for a couple weeks, then decided that I should buy it, but it sold a few days before I got back there. I'm sure glad it sold, because a year later I wound up buying an excellent original 1950 Land Cruiser with overdrive for $2000 less. I consider an automatic just an around town car for driving, while my overdrive is much better for cross country drives.

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  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Studebakers are pretty narrow; more so than many of their contemporaries. 47-52 are the same width, with the widest part being the bulge in the forward end of the rear fenders.

    Studebaker Champions are great cars, but when equipped with an automatic transmission, their acceleration is quite leisurely. Read that S-L-O-O-O-O-W. Also, since the top gear is 1:1, they are limited in top speed - around 55 or so - much more limited than an overdrive equipped car.

    The reason that automatic transmission equipped Champions are coming out of the woodwork these days is probably because they have been passed over for decades in favor of cars equipped with overdrive transmissions. Overdrive equipped Champion cars are much more fun to drive, get better gas mileage and can actually go on the highway.
    Last edited by RadioRoy; 06-16-2019, 02:15 PM.

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  • Edsel Face
    replied
    Actually I was wondering if I SHOULD consider it. I think my suspicions have been confirmed. Also, nowhere can I find the dimension of the width of a '50 or '51 Champion. I need to determine if there is adequate space with another car in the garage. I'm OK on length.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    So I take it William that you are considering a '50 Champion with Studebaker Automatic Drive?

    There are many opinions of these Transmissions, expensive and difficult to find Parts and qualified Mechanics to rebuild them and also very GOOD, strong Transmissions used in Jaguars, Mercedes etc. but long story short, they perform MUCH better with a V8 Engine or over 120 HP, an 80 HP Champion labors quite a bit to drive the Car AND that Automatic.

    That is not to say that you (or someone) could not drive a Car like that in excellent, well maintained condition for 10 years or more and just LOVE it. Would I? Probably not.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 06-16-2019, 01:31 PM.

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  • Hallabutt
    replied
    In our collection we have a little of everything from 1931 on. While the suspensions changed during the mid 30's and again in 1951 the one thing that is a constant is that ride characteristics on all Studebakers is consistently good. The one caveat is condition, as Roy has already mentioned. No suspension in warn out condition is going to deliver a good ride. Just don't fall into the trap, that many seem to have fallen into, that just because a design is old, or unique, that it is substandard and requires change.

    To be more specific to the question, we own both a 1950 Champion Starlight coupe and a 1951 Champion four dr. The 50 has 57K miles and the 51 70K miles. Both suspensions have been well maintained and neither rebuilt other then shocks. I can say without hesitation that there is virtually no appreciable difference in handling or ride characteristics. The front leaf springs of the pre-1950 planar suspension did require a little different maintenance schedule, but everything being equal, I find little to recommend the later iterations over the early planar suspensions.

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  • Edsel Face
    replied
    Thank you all for your assistance. My other question concerns transmissions. I am a little leary of the early automatics. Should I be?

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    OR... William (Edsel Face), why not take a "Virtual" Ride in a 1950 Studebaker?

    https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?111385-The-pride-of-South-Bend

    A word of caution though, you DO have to keep in mind that this Car and Test Drive would be like Apples to Oranges to compare a '50 CHAMPION to this car.

    That is because a 1950 Commander Land Cruiser is like comparing a Chevrolet to a Buick or Cadillac!

    Except for the common styling ques, they are two very different Cars.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 06-15-2019, 11:33 PM.

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  • sals54
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    It's possible that they were scary because they were worn out, not because they were poor designs.
    Roy... that's a good point. I did have most of the cars in pretty decent condition, but I did not overhaul all the suspensions of the cars that passed through my hands. But for some reason, the early cars that I did get all seemed to drive very similar to one another. Each one of them tended to lean quite heavily around corners. And that was in normal driving, not the very spirited driving I would do in my Coupe or the Avantis. Nearly every one of the later cars had very mild manners in every day driving.
    At any rate, point taken. The new owner can make up his own mind, but I would admonish him to drive both before making the final decision. See if he thinks they are equal.

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