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Found a Very Nice '63 Cruiser. Need opinions. Not online, local.

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  • allen04084
    replied
    Looks clean, detailed and well cared for by a Studebaker enthusiast. I like the color too. Hope it's as nice as it looks in the pics. If so, I'd snatch it. I'd replace the tires with correct width ww's - that's about it for cosmetics.
    Last edited by allen04084; 06-03-2019, 05:04 AM.

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  • spokejr
    replied
    That's a rather unusual colour in this day...and probably why it looks so damn good!

    If the tin worm hasn't eaten the car out, it runs and drives as it should, it's probably worth your man's claimed bottom dollar.

    One thing about springing for this. Yes, it does sap resources in the short term regarding your other car but then again, you have less of a rush to get the other running. You can make sure you got a task done right and not just done.

    If I were in a position to even consider another car, I be hunting for that one, it is pretty!

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  • bjackameit
    replied
    Nice car for someone who wants a '63 Cruiser --

    While it is not possible to know for sure without an in-person inspection and test drive. this appears to be an excellent example of a 1963 Cruiser and well worth $6,000.

    As noted above, it would not be possible to restore one for that price -- my preferred approach is to buy the best example you can find of what you want and plan on doing the finishing touches after someone else has done the heavy lifting -- although even "finishing touches" can get costly -- depending upon what they are --

    This car appears to have enjoyed a good home and it deserves another good home --
    Last edited by bjackameit; 06-03-2019, 08:36 AM.

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  • kamzack
    replied
    Agree with Milaca. Put them side by side and you'll see very close cabin appearance. Make it happen, you'll thank yourself down the road.
    Kim

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  • Milaca
    replied
    The 1957 Scotsman and the 1963 Cruiser are the same width, height and have the same interior volume. However the 1957 is a little longer as it has more front overhang (and maybe a little more rear overhang).
    So, have you made an offer yet?

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  • ddub
    replied
    If you like this car, find a way to buy it. You can enjoy driving it while you slowly bring back the '57.

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  • Pepse
    replied
    jclary,

    Working on it would be probably a little easier than the '57. Small car verses big car. True under hood is a bit more cramped but that's what happens when you add a V8 to a smaller car.

    As for maintenance verses new cars? Hell I grew up with this stuff. If you had a car approaching 100,00 miles? Very special back then. Owning the '57 is fun in that I am doing things I grew up doing. Although the Stude is a little different than a Ford but it is still a pleasure to work on it. Dirty, greasy, knuckle bustin', Fun. You don't get that with a newer vehicle. Plug it in and "It's broke" or "Not sure what is bad".

    Oh, the odometer showed 68K.

    Later. Pepse.

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  • Pepse
    replied
    As for the oil bath air cleaner? He has it. As for the window sticker? There is another one on the passenger side. Both "stickers have the "build sheet" at the bottom. I will add the other one to this post.

    There was 2 other guys looking at it while I was there. They seemed very impressed with the chassis. Which (for what it is worth) the Build Sheet states the car was undercoated.

    The car does have the necessary shop manual, and chassis manual, and some other books that are in the trunk.

    Yeah, overall as I see it it would be worth it. Now for plan "B".

    Later. Pepse.
    Attached Files

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  • jclary
    replied
    Quit stalling!...If you enjoy mechanical tinkering, have sufficient curiosity for improving your skills and learning things new to you, then you have great potential for a great journey/experience with this vehicle. It has sufficient power, and is family friendly. It will never be a 100,000 mile between tune-up service vehicle. None of these cars are ever "finished," as we know current computer controlled minimum maintenance vehicles. You will need a set of tools, grease gun, wheel puller, brake adjuster, manuals, & willingness to read & study...even if you hire a mechanic, knowing the basic mechanical requirements will equip you with sufficient judgement to hire a knowledgeable mechanic.

    Having to pay more than you were hoping for should solidify your commitment and make the vehicle more valuable requiring you to give it proper care. Hopefully, your commitment will include a good place to keep it out of the sun and rain. If not now, some kind of shelter will be part of your plan going forward. Just got back from church after my first foray in public this year in my 1955 truck(pictured below). A fellow church member approached me and asked, "When did you get that truck?" "Oh...'bout 44 years ago," was my reply. Back when I bought it, I was fresh out of college, living in a mobile home.

    Price wise...it was a steal...but a significant sacrifice...I didn't know it was a steal back then...now I know!

    So...quit stalling...buy it...report back to us in 40 years.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Unless it's been terribly rusty underneath and has been patched up, it looks to be well worth the money.

    Note that it lost its oil bath air cleaner (on the window sticker) somewhere along the way, but that's no big deal.

    Looks like a nice car! BP
    Production Order, not "window sticker" (normally meaning new car pricing label), even though it is affixed to a window.

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  • studegary
    replied
    If it is not a rusty car patched up and it drives ok, offer him $5K cash. You can either sell your '57 to help finance it or drive it until your '57 is finished and then sell it and probably get your money back and perhaps with a profit.

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  • Milaca
    replied
    Originally posted by Pepse View Post
    It is Sea Spray Green. Not a catchy color but then this is actually built for a woman. It has a Vanity compartment Not a glove compartment and a raised part on the passenger side floor that (as the owner said) has something to do with when women wear heels it is a reminder that they have heels on. ??
    As for the Vanity, it was standard equipment for all Larks in 1963 (except for maybe the standard/base model Larks) and I doubt the raised part of the passenger floor was for high-heel awareness, as all Larks used the same floor pans.
    It is a great looking car, and appears to have correct reproduction upholstery which looks perfect. Take the car for a test drive, and follow your gut feeling.

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  • jackb
    replied
    I prefer oil bath, if I had the choice.....looks like maybe someone thought this was a 61-62' given the color and the tires.....nice car, hold rust inspection...

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Unless it's been terribly rusty underneath and has been patched up, it looks to be well worth the money.

    Note that it lost its oil bath air cleaner (on the window sticker) somewhere along the way, but that's no big deal.

    Looks like a nice car! BP

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  • Pepse
    replied
    kamzack, I agree. I know it will cost a lot for the '57, but I am trying to focus on it. I mean when I was given a choice as to taking 4 Larks to make 1 or 2 Or take the '57 and go with it. Obviously I took the '57. Another reason for the choice is I grew up with full size cars, not full size compacts. But it is tough at this moment.

    creegster, I am kicking myself now, but trying to come up with plan "B"

    Later. Pepse.

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