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  • #31
    Originally posted by commander cody View Post
    What about the supposed stash of parts left over in Hamilton Ontario? I'm in need of seat fabric
    Your answer is in Post number 3, if I understand it correctly a Lot of parts and material were sent back to South Bend from Hamilton, so "some" Canadian Production interior pieces may still be in the Starlight Studebaker Warehouse.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #32
      I remember a picture at Standard surplus bulletin board in the early 70's of a large pile of sheetmetal in the yard that had been thrown from the windows to create room in the warehouse.
      I asked about it and either Dennis Lambert or Jeff (spelling) Newman said that the pile of sheetmetal was mostly 1958 Packard stuff because in his opinion no-one would ever restore an ugly car like that.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
        I remember a picture at Standard surplus bulletin board in the early 70's of a large pile of sheetmetal in the yard that had been thrown from the windows to create room in the warehouse.
        I asked about it and either Dennis Lambert or Jeff (spelling) Newman said that the pile of sheetmetal was mostly 1958 Packard stuff because in his opinion no-one would ever restore an ugly car like that.
        I believe that they tossed out a lot of truck stuff, particularly sheet metal because no one would pay to restore one of those.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by 556063 View Post
          This is jogging some serious grey matter. I had hundreds of questions for Carl while in my car. One was if Studebaker was ever the subject of a NHTSA Recall. His answer was "almost", and it had to do with a technical issue on the 64-66 models. Ignition related, as I recall. His team worked to correct the issue, and no formal recall was issued. But there was an inquiry. He remained as a Manager until sometime in 1972 (Six model years past 1966), when all Automotive related functions were terminated. 39 Years with Studebaker,

          I have my own opinions and experiences with South Bend and the parts inventory. I helped Dennis move across the street, and then watched South Bend do everything it could to run the inventory out of town. Sorry, but it wouldn't hurt my feelings if the May Meet followed the parts to the Indy area in the future. Sorry, I'm not going any further than that, as I could write a book on the nutty things I've seen happen in South Bend the last 40 years. I'm not making any more comments than that.
          I seem to recall that part of the deal when the City sold the parts inventory was that the parts had to remain in South Bend?
          Dan Peterson
          Montpelier, VT
          1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
          1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by dpson View Post
            I seem to recall that part of the deal when the City sold the parts inventory was that the parts had to remain in South Bend?
            I suspect that is why Ed sold the company to the present owners , so he was no longer stuck with that ridiculous $18.000 each month rent in South Bend.

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            • #36
              I think there is or was some Federal Law requiring manufacturers to maintain a spare parts inventory for a certain amount of time, since Studebaker was "collectable" even after production stopped they may have still
              had to live with the regulation. Still yet people make a ton of money on old parts for anything that went out of production. That company in Columbus, Ohio that owns Value City, DSW and Odd Lots made a a bunch
              of money in the early 50's when the bought out the national distributor of FIAT cars and parts for 5 cents on the dollar, and supply parts for those little gems at full retail for years. I think they were the Shotenstein family
              (not sure of the spelling), in interestingly the owner of the FIAT USA that closed was FDR's son.

              Comment


              • #37
                "in interestingly the owner of the FIAT USA that closed was FDR's son."

                Well that explains something I wondered about. The Studebaker dealer in Winooski, VT Archie Myers later became a Fiat dealer and when I bought the inventory there was paperwork from the Fiat dealership that referenced the exclusive distributor which was Roosevelt Motors (or something like that). So that explains where the name came from.
                Dan Peterson
                Montpelier, VT
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
                  I suspect that is why Ed sold the company to the present owners , so he was no longer stuck with that ridiculous $18.000 each month rent in South Bend.
                  It would be interesting to see if that requirement remained with the inventory if it was later sold?
                  Dan Peterson
                  Montpelier, VT
                  1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                  1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
                    I suspect that is why Ed sold the company to the present owners , so he was no longer stuck with that ridiculous $18.000 each month rent in South Bend.
                    I thought that later location in northern Indiana was not within the City of South Bend.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by dpson View Post
                      "in interestingly the owner of the FIAT USA that closed was FDR's son."

                      Well that explains something I wondered about. The Studebaker dealer in Winooski, VT Archie Myers later became a Fiat dealer and when I bought the inventory there was paperwork from the Fiat dealership that referenced the exclusive distributor which was Roosevelt Motors (or something like that). So that explains where the name came from.
                      Yes, Kermit Roosevelt became the sole US distributor. I was working for a shop that sold Fiat about the time the new 124 and 850 models came in.
                      So.....if I'm 'pre-approved' why do you want me to fill out an application?

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by mike cenit View Post
                        I think there is or was some Federal Law requiring manufacturers to maintain a spare parts inventory for a certain amount of time, since Studebaker was "collectable" even after production stopped they may have still
                        had to live with the regulation.
                        I have heard that, too -- but suspect it's an urban legend. I doubt that there is such a federal law, though there may very well be some Federal Trade Commission regulations based on prior court decisions that resulted from someone's inability to get replacement parts. In any case, any such reg would have only applied to important drive-train and suspension components, and not stuff like interior soft parts. Stude always sold its leftover interior stuff to Newman & Altman after only a couple of years. It takes up a lot of storage space, and most people didn't/don't care about perfectly matching the torn upholstery of their used car anyway.

                        In the late 1960s, the Studebaker board badly wanted to jettison every remnant of their automotive heritage, but they needed to continue to provide spare parts and fulfill their contracts with the few remaining dealers. So in 1971/72 Studebaker / SASCO transferred their parts depot to the newly-created Avanti Parts Corp -- only 5 years after they quit making cars. AP got the parts cheap, but was obliged to continue to honor the dealer discounts on parts for the remaining dealers. I suspect that this contractual obligation was a much bigger concern than any FTC reg regarding keeping parts available. AP, owned by the Newman and Altman families, was intended to be a for-profit corporation, so it started the tradition of reproducing fast-selling replacement parts.
                        Skip Lackie

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Dwain G. View Post
                          Yes, Kermit Roosevelt became the sole US distributor. I was working for a shop that sold Fiat about the time the new 124 and 850 models came in.
                          I guess that Kermit was a fairly common name back then. FDR's home was here in Dutchess County, NY. The maker of the Muppets characters was also a Kermit, hence one named after him, and also from Dutchess County.
                          Fiats were also sold here in Dutchess County, including one large Fiat exclusive dealership.
                          Gary L.
                          Wappinger, NY

                          SDC member since 1968
                          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            This is where time, my age, and memory start to play tricks, but I'm pretty sure that Roosevelt Motors (Fiat) was owned by FDR JR. Kermi,t I think was Teddy's son whom died by his own hand during WW ll. JR. I seem to
                            recall was involved somehow with Jaguar also, maybe just a dealership. Also that Chipawa Ave plant, has had a pretty good run since Studebaker close, Kaiser 2 1/2 ton Army trucks, Post Office Jeeps, American General, I always wondered
                            why after the war Studebaker didn't start to move the entire SB operation into that plant and in time move the whole South Bend operation out of the old SB location. The building is owned by a company called IRG, whom buys all these decommissioned plants and finds use for them, they did a real good job with the old Akron Goodyear facility. One thing for sure they don't give the rent away.

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                            • #44
                              Speaking of urban legend's I had heard that after shut down in 1964 somebody doing an inventory discovered a few hundred 1959 or 1960 Larks, brand new, awaiting a letter of credit, or payment to ship out.
                              Two or three years old, brand new....wonder if there was any truth to that "urban legend?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                What many do not know is at the time of Studebaker closing, Standard Surplus (N&A) purchased parts buy the ton. Trucks and trailers were loaded and weighed. They bought everything by the pound, not its value
                                At the 1969 National SDC meet in South Bend, a V8 chrome dress-up kit was about $25. R3 and R4 fender emblems were $1 each. I paid $150 for the complete interior for my Lark including the dash pad.
                                james r pepper

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