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  • #16
    Originally posted by wittsend View Post
    I'm curious, is it typical when an auto manufacture stops making cars to have such a significant surplus of parts? And, if not, why was it the case that Studebaker did? Their numbers were smaller than the Big 4 at the time (I'm including AMC). They continued building cars in Canada a few years after the USA manufacturing stopped. These aspects would seem to deplete a significant amount of surplus. The only situation that seems to come close is Delorian.

    I'm also curious that "dealers" remained after cars were no longer manufactured. Were they selling (new) old stock cars? Were they simply dealers who still had a significant service base and were riding a business to the very end?

    Lastly the volume of available parts..., is it an asset for the obvious reasons, or is there a detriment (to car valuations) in that "rarity" isn't a word too often used except for the few unique cars?
    Tax laws in 1966-72 did not allow for tax credits if the parts were destroyed. By the time AMC and Chrysler merged in c. 1986, that had changed, and I cried when our parts manager came to me with a list of AMC (and Mopar) parts that were going to be destroyed at the time of the merger. Heard stories from our Parts Rep of sledgehammers being taken to B Block and the big AMC engines.

    Studebaker could only realize cash from the sale of the parts, not tax laws. And they were sold cheap, because in 1973 or so when my 55 was freshened up by its previous owner, the N&A receipt for two NOS front fenders, a new radio, and a bunch of other goodies came to less than $40. The parts were being sold by the pound at that time. I can remember the scale at N&A, but darn it, never got to use it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by wittsend View Post

      I'm also curious that "dealers" remained after cars were no longer manufactured. Were they selling (new) old stock cars? Were they simply dealers who still had a significant service base and were riding a business to the very end?

      Lastly the volume of available parts..., is it an asset for the obvious reasons, or is there a detriment (to car valuations) in that "rarity" isn't a word too often used except for the few unique cars?
      These questions deserve a separate response. Studebaker did not go out of business, they just went out of the auto business. Therefore, product liability and safety issues remained with the "Mother Ship" for, according to the regulations of the time, five model years. I believe if a similar case happens today, that stretches to ten model years. Most recently, Suzuki stopped it's auto business in the US, and I listened to a Chicago Radio Show that explained Suzuki will have to maintain service centers that can perform recalls and such for ten model years from the model year they pulled out. Even if they don't have a Suzuki sign. I'm sure all Suzuki owners have a phone number or website to go to today for help locating a service center.

      Handling the termination of dealer contracts was a huge issue with the closing, better explained by reading Studebaker books and articles available on the matter. The production in Canada is often called a band aid for the best dealers. But yes, even back then, successful dealers had profitable service departments, and Studebaker, still technically in business, supported them as they supported people with the product.

      As far as your final question, that's hard to say, and my opinion will certainly be disagreed with. I would say in the early years, it kept many from being junked. As time moves on, only the plentiful Lark stuff is common, but even it is getting pricey. And, even the early Lark stuff is getting thin. Overall the availability of parts has drawn more into the fold than it has turned away, so overall, I'd call it a huge positive. But unfortunately, nothing lasts forever. Enjoy it while you can.

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      • #18
        Studebaker probably scrapped parts at about the same rate as other manufacturers, but they refreshed their styling less frequently than the big three, and so often carried over body parts and trim for several years -- thus obviating the need to dispose of stuff to make room for new replacement parts. Second, they had a ready market for left-over parts -- Standard Surplus Division of Newman & Altman. They were always so short of money that selling surplus parts to N&A was a significant source of income.

        And after December 1963, they had almost no need to make room for new replacement parts, at least in South Bend. That froze the leftover inventory at the Dec 63 level, and no further parts were scrapped or sold until the SASCO parts dept inventory was transferred to the newly-created Avanti Parts Corp in 1971(?) and then sold again to N&A in 1982(?). [Can't confirm the dates right now.]
        Skip Lackie

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        • #19
          Originally posted by StudeRich View Post

          At Frost and French, we had Service, Parts and Sales Dept's.
          Reconditioned GT Hawks and New Avanti II's were put in the showroom along with a few remaining 1966's until gone, and the Hawks sold like hotcakes! I had fun helping recondition them!
          Rich, Frank French told me that when Studebaker stopped selling cars, he and Walter bought all the 1966 cars that SoCal dealers would sell them. Several times, they bought the dealers parts inventory too.

          When Studebaker folded, Toyota sent 'road men' to the dealers attempting to sign them up...and they were quite successful doing this.

          Here in LA LA Land, both Hamer in Mission Hills and A.C. Almind in Redlands signed on, and Hamer is still in business.

          btw: F&F was not a Avanti II dealer, they did a few "courtesy deliveries," but that was it. Nate Altman visited F&F several times.

          At one time, F&F was offered a VW franchise, but they weren't interested.

          I assume you're aware that F&F was originally a Ford dealer.
          Last edited by WinM1895; 05-06-2019, 02:12 PM.

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          • #20
            Thanks everybody, for the valuable input. I had read bits and pieces over the years, but this puts it all into better order, with other interesting information added. I have driven Studebakers since the late 70s, but relied mostly on junkyards, and parts cars, for parts. After the internet came to be, it became a lot easier to find sources for used and NOS parts.

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            • #21
              Thank you all for taking the time to enlighten me. The subject(s) are rather interesting and I'm glad the initial question was broached.
              '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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              • #22
                And I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the fate of the Packard Corporation's parts inventory when they folded shop in Detroit.
                "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                '33 Rockne 10,
                '51 Commander Starlight,
                '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                '56 Sky Hawk

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                  And I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the fate of the Packard Corporation's parts inventory when they folded shop in Detroit.
                  Agree, because I'm not a regular member of the Packard Club, I don't remember reading anything on the Detroit divesture. However, the leftover 275hp 352" Packard V8s sent to South Bend for 1956 Golden Hawk production were for sale at Standard Surplus as late as 1964 for $395. That might appear a bargain until inflation is calculated to $3,239.03 in today's scrap dollars.

                  Or the South Bend urban legend of how the dozens of NOS 259" crankshafts were salvaged from the (Hurwich Iron ??) scrap yard and wound up at a vendor in (WI ??).

                  Or the legend of how a truckload of complete R2 engines were pirated to a boat yard in Seattle?

                  jack vines
                  PackardV8

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by WinM1895 View Post
                    Rich, /Cut/ I assume you're aware that F&F was originally a Ford dealer.
                    Yes Bill, and I also remember that they were Packard Dealers after Ford, and that you said that Bob Moss the Parts Manager, had come from another Packard Dealer. That explains his Passion for the Detroit Packards.

                    He could pull all the parts to rebuild a Twin Ultramatic and write all the 4XXXXX & 64XXXXX Part Numbers on the Shop Work Order from Memory, just about in his sleep!
                    Last edited by StudeRich; 05-07-2019, 12:51 PM.
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                      Yes Bill, and I also remember that they were Packard Dealers after Ford, and that you said that Bob Moss the Parts Manager, had come from another Packard Dealer. That explains his Passion for the Detroit Packards.

                      He could pull all the parts to rebuild a Twin Ultramatic and write all the 4XXXXX & 64XXXXX Part Numbers on the Shop Work Order from Memory, just about in his sleep!
                      That's because Twin Ultramatics may have been the source for the common slang experession, "it went TU". Bob Moss was familiar with the part numbers because they required rebuilding ever 50,000 miles, if not sooner.

                      jack vines
                      PackardV8

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                        Agree, because I'm not a regular member of the Packard Club, I don't remember reading anything on the Detroit divesture. However, the leftover 275hp 352" Packard V8s sent to South Bend for 1956 Golden Hawk production were for sale at Standard Surplus as late as 1964 for $395. That might appear a bargain until inflation is calculated to $3,239.03 in today's scrap dollars.

                        Or the South Bend urban legend of how the dozens of NOS 259" crankshafts were salvaged from the (Hurwich Iron ??) scrap yard and wound up at a vendor in (WI ??).

                        Or the legend of how a truckload of complete R2 engines were pirated to a boat yard in Seattle?

                        jack vines
                        I don't know about the "urban legend" part of it. I do remember NOS V8 crankshafts being sold at Hurwich for $10 each. I didn't buy any because I didn't need any at the time. I did buy a couple of sets of NOS front fenders for cars that I owned at the time for $10 each fender. I knew of some that bought a few crankshafts. I heard of someone that bought a truckload of parts from Hurwich at $10 per item prices.
                        Last edited by studegary; 05-08-2019, 08:55 AM. Reason: clarity
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                          And I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the fate of the Packard Corporation's parts inventory when they folded shop in Detroit.
                          Packard erected a new V8 engine plant and parts depot in Utica, adjacent to their test track.

                          When Packard folded, the parts were shipped to South Bend, the test track was sold to FoMoCo.

                          Members of Packard Automobile Classics and the Classic Car Club said that James J. Nance had ordered old parts to be scrapped, but there was no truth to this rumor.

                          Some of the parts were stolen while being transferred from Detroit to Utica.

                          George Hamlin interviewed Nance while he was president of a bank in Cleveland for an article he wore in the Packard Cormorant, the house organ of PAC

                          Nance, formerly with Hotpoint, Packard, Studebaker-Packard and the only president of the Edsel Division dispelled many rumors.

                          Rich: Bob was the parts manager of the Packard factory branch in Kansas City MO

                          When Packard folded, Bob moved to L/A in 1957, went to work for F&F as their parts manager.

                          I asked Bob one time how he could recall so many Packard/Studebaker part numbers. He said one word: rote.
                          Last edited by WinM1895; 05-07-2019, 11:46 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by studegary View Post
                            I don't know about the "urban legend" part of it. I do remember NOS V8 crankshafts being sold at Hurwich for $10 each. I didn't buy any because I didn't need any at the time. I did buy a couple of sets of NOS front fenders for cars that I owned at the time for $10 each fender. I knew of some that bought a few crankshafts. I heard of someone that bought a truckload of parts from Hurwich at $10 per item prices.
                            As I recall, there was possibly an ad or letter to the editor in Turning Wheels circa 1974 on the $10 crankshafts. Not going to go searching for it now but I am thinking in March or April.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Guido View Post
                              As I recall, there was possibly an ad or letter to the editor in Turning Wheels circa 1974 on the $10 crankshafts. Not going to go searching for it now but I am thinking in March or April.
                              The time that I remember these bargains at Hurwich was in the 1971-1974 time frame. Of course, $10 then would equate to more now, but it was still a good price.
                              Gary L.
                              Wappinger, NY

                              SDC member since 1968
                              Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                              • #30
                                What about the supposed stash of parts left over in Hamilton Ontario? I'm in need of seat fabric

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