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  • Watch those brakes!

    https://idyllwildtowncrier.com/2019/...n-darryl-road/

  • #2
    I saw this car up close and personal a couple days ago. It was pretty horrendous. The towing company is also the local garage that does some work for me. Was in the other day to get some work done when it caught my eye. The car really collapsed badly. She posted on craigslist to sell parts. Here is the post https://inlandempire.craigslist.org/...874110800.html

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    • #3
      Bless her, and it is possible the seller was honest and still the brakes failed. Not enough information to make any solid judgments on this tragedy except to note some general observations that relate to my own experience. I have owned, driven, and even carried my young daughter in my Studebakers with zero belts and certainly no safety devices as the ones we take for granted these days. It was the norm back then but certainly not now.

      When my grandchildren came along, my daughter who survived her childhood riding in my Studebakers wisely restricted them from doing the same. I have never objected, and respect them enough to not purposely expose them to the danger. I still have three Studebakers (with no seat belts) registered and insured. If my (now) grown grandchildren would want to go for a ride, they are welcome to make that choice. However, if they have children, I will not expose them to highway traffic in my vintage cars unless I install safety equipment. Even then, I'll do my best to make sure the vehicles are in the best mechanical condition possible.

      From the get-go...any single chamber master cylinder vehicle is suspect compared to today's standards. A vintage car may carry a great "cool factor" as a daily driver, but for hauling around your infant...any half-way decent modern (crash test era) beater car would be a much wiser choice.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #4
        It was pretty clear that it had issues before the crash but for a young person who grew up around modern cars, they don't realize the old stuff doesn't have reserve systems. I feel bad for her because the Lark is a charming car and I'm sure thats what attracted her to it, but you have to stay on top of the basic systems. I looked inside of it and interior cabin was intact steering wheel still in same position, seats still level, floors still where they should be and the doors open/closed. Its just sad to see this happen and hope she recovers well from it.

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        • #5
          Jim Turner sell a conversion kit that replaces the single Master cylinder with a dual
          cylinders so if the rear brakes fail the fronts will stop the car and visa versa.
          http://www.turnerbrake.com/mcbrackets.html

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          • #6
            Pulling the parking brake would have helped. Sure hate to see her get hurt and another Stude bite the dust.

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            • #7
              I agree with you Tom. Provided of course if the e-brake even worked. However I also agree with young people not understanding these vehicles and additionally driving way too fast.

              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
              Ron Smith
              Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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              • #8
                My -55 Champion has a 318 Mopar V8 & original non-power drum(!) brakes, &/but all cylinders & pipes new & it stops GOOD & easy! Had a -63 Valiant once thou that one cylinder failed on & the 2 modern cars in front of me had to be towed away & scrapped.
                Just saying...
                sigpic

                Josephine
                -55
                Champion V8
                4d sedan

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
                  Pulling the parking brake would have helped. Sure hate to see her get hurt and another Stude bite the dust.
                  Certainly agree, but not everybody is a car freak and remembers these things. I blew a brake line in a 62 Chevy decades ago as I was approaching a red light. I stepped down hard on the emergency brake (it used to be called the EMERGENCY brake) and locked up the rear wheels. It stopped me in time. But my elderly mother had a similar thing happen in a 62 Olds F85 and did what the lady in the article did -- chose to steer into a bunch of bushes.

                  There were cases a few years ago where people were killed in crashes when their throttles got stuck in the WOT position. They all were pushing hard on the brakes, but none thought to either throw the car in neutral or turn off the ignition (which admittedly might have locked their steering). Thinking clearly in an emergency isn't easy.
                  Skip Lackie

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                  • #10
                    I highly recommend installing a dual master when the time comes to replace or rebuild a master cylinder.
                    That said, I also feel we should recognize the single cylinder system was installed on all makes and models for the better part of thirty years.
                    Too often we do, or have done, an oil change, lubrication and filters, and perhaps pack bearings, while neglecting the realization old steel brakes lines have been rusting, many now for six or seven decades!

                    Brake system maintenance needs to include more than checking the fluid level. Complete brake line and hose replacement PRIOR TO a rupture simply makes sense; and not a bad idea to do it every time the master is replaced, if only because you love your children.

                    This is now the first week of May and, if you don't know how old those lines are, there's no better time than now to replace them.
                    Last edited by rockne10; 05-04-2019, 05:43 AM.
                    "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                    Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                    Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                    '33 Rockne 10,
                    '51 Commander Starlight,
                    '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                    '56 Sky Hawk

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                    • #11
                      I think it is the first week in May.
                      Almost Christmas again.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
                        I think it is the first week in May.
                        Well caught, Bob.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        '33 Rockne 10,
                        '51 Commander Starlight,
                        '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                        '56 Sky Hawk

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A dual master is the first project for me whenever I buy an old car. Not hard to do and not that much expense.
                          Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                            I highly recommend installing a dual master when the time comes to replace or rebuild a master cylinder.
                            That said, I also feel we should recognize the single cylinder system was installed on all makes and models for the better part of thirty years.
                            Too often we do, or have done, an oil change, lubrication and filters, and perhaps pack bearings, while neglecting the realization old steel brakes lines have been rusting, many now for six or seven decades!

                            Brake system maintenance needs to include more than checking the fluid level. Complete brake line and hose replacement PRIOR TO a rupture simply makes sense; and not a bad idea to do it every time the master is replaced, if only because you love your children.

                            This is now the first week of May and, if you don't know how old those lines are, there's no better time than now to replace them.
                            Good post in spite of the (now corrected) calendar issue. Regardless of the condition of the hydraulic brake components (single/dual MC), the importance of the mechanical safety backup (emergency) brake cannot be overemphasized. The subject is worthy of much discussion and repetition.

                            Over the years, I have encountered many vehicles with maladjusted, or inoperative emergency brakes. Even worse, sketchy attempts at repairs, like having a broken cable patched with a piece of wire poorly twisted together. Not even cable specific hardware often seen in marine applications are sufficient for such repairs. If the cables are damaged they should be replaced. The mechanisms are engineered for a straight pull from each pivot point to the other in any of these configurations. The adjustments are designed to make certain that power/leverage equalizes to both rear wheels. I can't think of a single patch to an emergency brake system that comes close to being as safe and secure as one in its proper original state. That applies to the systems that clamp to the single emergency brake drum applied to drive shafts too! (Although, I've never been fond of those.)

                            Another good practice is to take a little time to think of what you would do in a panic stop and train yourself to operate the emergency/hand/foot brake. I have vehicles with both style mechanisms. The hand brake handles are in different locations. Even if you only mentally practice the operation, it should help in a panic stop. In my yard, I sometimes use (only) the emergency brake for a slow speed stop just to confirm they are operating and properly adjusted.
                            John Clary
                            Greer, SC

                            SDC member since 1975

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Like Skip Lackie post #9 wrote; it aint easy when the stress sets in! I remember in the Valiant that it fellt like a free fall & I just steered as hard as I could into the thick siderail by the road but ofcourse it didn't do much good... The rear window of the car in front of me exploded & I saw the back seat jumping forward...
                              (My own back seat also came lose but Tjevvi my dog was totally cool & just jumped out when I called him to go to the gas station 50 meters back & call the cops.)
                              sigpic

                              Josephine
                              -55
                              Champion V8
                              4d sedan

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