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  • #16
    Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    Certainly agree, but not everybody is a car freak and remembers these things. I blew a brake line in a 62 Chevy decades ago as I was approaching a red light. I stepped down hard on the emergency brake (it used to be called the EMERGENCY brake) and locked up the rear wheels. It stopped me in time. But my elderly mother had a similar thing happen in a 62 Olds F85 and did what the lady in the article did -- chose to steer into a bunch of bushes.

    There were cases a few years ago where people were killed in crashes when their throttles got stuck in the WOT position. They all were pushing hard on the brakes, but none thought to either throw the car in neutral or turn off the ignition (which admittedly might have locked their steering). Thinking clearly in an emergency isn't easy.
    Yep, it happened to me 2 years ago on my 1999 Olds 88. The throttle stuck almost wide open as I left the stop light, so I had to turn off the ignition and pull to the shoulder. I forced the throttle back to idle position and drove home. When I took the throttle body shaft out, it only had a trace of very fine red powder rust, but the shaft was such a tight fit that this was all it took to make it stick. Road salt can kill. I was surprised that the brakes couldn't hold back the stock 3.8 engine power. Most of todays cars do have more horsepower than they need.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Noxnabaker View Post
      Like Skip Lackie post #9 wrote; it aint easy when the stress sets in! I remember in the Valiant that it fellt like a free fall & I just steered as hard as I could into the thick siderail by the road but ofcourse it didn't do much good... The rear window of the car in front of me exploded & I saw the back seat jumping forward...
      (My own back seat also came lose but Tjevvi my dog was totally cool & just jumped out when I called him to go to the gas station 50 meters back & call the cops.)
      I want to hear more about your dog that called the cops . I am not trying to make fun of your English. The mental picture that I conjured up stuck me funny.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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      • #18
        Sorry to say I just cringe at the thought of a young woman with a child using a 60 yo car for daily transportation. Structural integrity, brakes, seat belts, padded dash, lack of air bags-recipe for disaster. I can't be convinced that putting brakes on a Studebaker is the solution for sixty years of automotive safety innovation.

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        • #19
          Please correct me if I'm wrong, but looking at the map, it appears that she lives in hill country.
          It would be dicey at best to use a Lark as a daily driver in hill country unless you're well versed in how to drive and maintain a 60 year old car with manual drum brakes.
          God bless her and her child. I hope they are OK. But she should not be blaming the seller. Used cars are ALWAYS a buyer beware sale. Once you get an old car it becomes your responsibility to check it, check it again, maintain it, learn about it and use it with caution.
          sals54

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
            Sorry to say I just cringe at the thought of a young woman with a child using a 60 yo car for daily transportation. Structural integrity, brakes, seat belts, padded dash, lack of air bags-recipe for disaster. I can't be convinced that putting brakes on a Studebaker is the solution for sixty years of automotive safety innovation.
            Agree, no reason she should have been DDing a car that old.

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            • #21
              I have Turner disc brakes on the front of my '65 Cruiser. Also have a dual master cylinder. I wouldn't have it any other way (well rear discs might be in its future). The same set up is in the future of my '61 Champ. As many of you know I take the Cruiser on lots of long distance road trips. Some interstate many on winding back roads. The car's brakes give me confidence in the car on these trips. Power Tour comes up soon and the Cruiser will be there, disc brakes and all. Oh, and also three point seat belts. Another up grade that I consider important for such trips as well as around the town trips.
              Joe Roberts
              '61 R1 Champ
              '65 Cruiser
              Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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              • #22
                Well Gary, (off topic here) even thou Tjevvi was a dog I reckon he would've spoken if he would have had the same lips & tounge as we have, they (non-dog-owners) say that dogs only understand your way of saying words, & only a few words too, but I tried changeing my tone & say the words in totally different ways & using different words too but he could never be fooled.
                Smartest dog I ever met, not always a good thing...
                & I'm happy if I make faults enough in "your" langue to make you smile!
                sigpic

                Josephine
                -55
                Champion V8
                4d sedan

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by jclary View Post
                  Regardless of the condition of the hydraulic brake components (single/dual MC), the importance of the mechanical safety backup (emergency) brake cannot be overemphasized.
                  Agreed!
                  Using the parking brake as a matter of habit goes a long way to maintaining its operation. Not exercising that cable is a sure way to have it not available when it's needed.
                  Many folks, especially with automatic transmissions, believe it's not necessary under most circumstances, as the transmission is sufficient to hold the vehicle. Well, ...they believe that at their peril; and find out otherwise when it's too late.
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  '33 Rockne 10,
                  '51 Commander Starlight,
                  '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                  '56 Sky Hawk

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                  • #24
                    I have been a parts vendor for over 35 years and I can not tell you how many times I have recommended to a new Studebaker owner to check his or her brake system. The excuses I have got are Its been garage kept or I have a very hard pedal and it stops great and the list goes on. But instead of brake parts they would rather have a NOS grill or parking light housings. I don't think its the case here but who knows , Ed

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                    • #25
                      Growing up in northern Indiana, I saw that my parents rarely, if ever, set the emergency brakes on their cars, primarily because it was generally flat and the transmission was good enough to hold the car. After completing a driver's education course where we were taught to set the brake after we put the car in park, I attempted to do the same with the family vehicles once I started driving them. The brake cables snapped soon afterward, or were so bound in the guide tubes by rust that the return springs could not bring the pedal back up when released. That's how I learned the importance of exercising the emergency brake through regular use.
                      Mark L

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Noxnabaker View Post
                        Well Gary, (off topic here) even thou Tjevvi was a dog I reckon he would've spoken if he would have had the same lips & tounge as we have, they (non-dog-owners) say that dogs only understand your way of saying words, & only a few words too, but I tried changeing my tone & say the words in totally different ways & using different words too but he could never be fooled.
                        Smartest dog I ever met, not always a good thing...
                        & I'm happy if I make faults enough in "your" langue to make you smile!
                        I am so glad that you realized that I was coming from a point of humor. From my information on the left of posts, you can see that I am a "dog person".

                        EDIT: It is my AOAI information that has a dog, not here on SDC. My last dog was a Leonberger.
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          The car is now for sale as a parts car. Wow, that's a big hit!
                          Sounds like she got pretty banged up, but the child car seat did it's job. Glad to hear everyone will recover. Everyone's worst nightmare.
                          Ad states seller she bought from was not honest. Maybe true, maybe not, but that's a single pot master cylinder and wheel cylinders of unknown age/condition. First thing to triple check on a new acquisition is brake system...all of it.

                          https://inlandempire.craigslist.org/

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                          • #28
                            First thing I did after my rebuilt engine was installed was to have the car towed to my local brake expert and have the one-pot MC replaced with a dual circuit system, with all new lines and hoses and cylinders. Stopping is WAY more important than going.

                            Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                            • #29
                              My opinion, based on experience, has been that a master cylinder virtually always gives plenty of warning before it fails completely. For me the question is the advisability of someone who is uninitiated, driving an old car for regular transportation. Most of us agree that a duel chambered MC is a better choice then a single chambered unit, but it is no substitute for owner diligence. A duel chambered MC is no magic solution to the hidden problems that might lurk in other parts of the braking system. Is it too early to tell if it was even a failed MC that caused the accident? A blown out line or hose is much more apt to have caused a complete brake failure, then is a failing MC.

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                              • #30
                                About brake cylinders failing; for me it was enough with just one of the front ones. No warning.
                                sigpic

                                Josephine
                                -55
                                Champion V8
                                4d sedan

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