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  • Electric fuel pumps, balderdash!

    Just picked up my 57 Commander from temporary storage away from home today. It sat 12 weeks, started after 12 second crank. Have your carb and fuel pump restored by Dave Thibeault and keep’em stock. I’ve never had any problems in the last 40 years with my antiques starting after sitting for weeks or months.

  • #2
    Good for you. The rest of us will install them and use them when needed.
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      12 seconds is amazing after sitting that long. My car always takes a bit of cranking if it has been idle for a week or more even with non-ethanol gas.
      "In the heart of Arkansas."
      Searcy, Arkansas
      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
      1952 2R pickup

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      • #4
        12 seconds is a long crank with things spinning and no oil pressure..!

        Fact, todays gasoline evaporates quickly.
        Fact, an engine needs oil to survive.
        Question, how many 12 second, no oil pressure crank revolutions can the bearings, cam and lifters survive ?

        Me, I'd rather have some piece of mind that I'm using some some bit of real life experience to help my engine internal parts survive as long as possible.

        Mike

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
          12 seconds is a long crank with things spinning and no oil pressure..!

          Fact, todays gasoline evaporates quickly.
          Fact, an engine needs oil to survive.
          Question, how many 12 second, no oil pressure crank revolutions can the bearings, cam and lifters survive ?

          Me, I'd rather have some piece of mind that I'm using some some bit of real life experience to help my engine internal parts survive as long as possible.

          Mike
          X2...both my 50+year vehicles start within 1 to 2 seconds of cranking after sitting for sometimes 6 months. Both are equipped with electronic ignitions and electric fuel pumps...can't imagine not having these items in modern times. cheers, junior
          sigpic
          1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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          • #6
            I can't imagine why anyone wouldn't want modern updates unless they enjoy starting their engines with a crank and manually advancing their advance on the steering wheel. Might be an exageration, but makes the point

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            • #7
              My '48 Starlight Coupe, restored by Jerry K. in Tuscon, came equipped with a 6 volt electric auxiliary pump.
              After returning to Arizona after an absence of 8 months, I primed the system for a few seconds, hit the throttle, then starter button, and she fired on the first crank.
              I thought that to be pretty impressive for a 6 volt system, albeit I had Non-Ethanol premium fuel in the tank. It had sat all summer in the 120's F temps.
              Bill

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                /Cut/12 seconds is a long crank with things spinning and no oil pressure..!

                Question, how many 12 second, no oil pressure crank revolutions can the bearings, cam and lifters survive ?/Cut/Mike
                Sorry Mike, but I have to disagree. My Oil Press. Gauge always gets up to about 40 PSI or MORE before starting.

                Also on only a few Weeks of storage or even Months, there is plenty of Oil still on the Cylinder Walls.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  What I don't understand is why an electric fuel pump is so bothersome? It is tucked away, out of sight. It decreases dry float bowl cranking time by at least 80%. It saves wear and tear on the starter and battery and while it seems arguable it likely does help with bearing life. It doesn't have to be left on after priming (thought it can be) and in the event of a mechanical pump failure it is an "instant on" back up fuel pump (something that might come in handy on a cold dark night at the side of the highway). They aren't expensive. Many have used the $15 Chinese versions successfully. If you insist on American made they are $40-$50. Safety devices (collision or oil pressure switches) for stalls or rollovers are simple and inexpensive.

                  So, please, with all those attributes can it be explained why when OTHER PEOPLE use them some seem to become greatly disturbed?
                  '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                    12 seconds is a long crank with things spinning and no oil pressure..!

                    Fact, todays gasoline evaporates quickly.
                    Fact, an engine needs oil to survive.
                    Question, how many 12 second, no oil pressure crank revolutions can the bearings, cam and lifters survive ?

                    Me, I'd rather have some piece of mind that I'm using some some bit of real life experience to help my engine internal parts survive as long as possible.

                    Mike
                    I've always thought that after a long period of storage, that disconnecting the ignition and cranking the motor until oil pressure was observed on a gauge and THEN trying to start it was preferred to lighting it off immediately and having the engine go to a much higher RPM than cranking speed before oil pressure was observed.
                    Dick Steinkamp
                    Bellingham, WA

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                    • #11
                      Interesting question wittsend. I wouldn't be without mine and use it to prime before every start if the car has been sitting more than a couple days. I am putting one on my 32 Ford this summer to help take the strain off a very old starter and a 6 volt starting system.

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                      • #12
                        I can't imagine why anyone wouldn't want modern updates unless they enjoy starting their engines with a crank and manually advancing their advance on the steering wheel. Might be an exageration, but makes the point
                        No. It doesn't. These are old cars in a modern world using modern fuel and lubes, and we want them to be dependable and drive them. If it takes a little modern push - cool with me.
                        The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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                        • #13
                          Correct me if I'm wrong, and I'm sure someone will, but during months when I know I won't be taking out my '63 Avanti, I always make sure to crank over the engine. I'll disconnect the coil wire, just in case, and crank it for about 5 seconds just to get the oil circulated. Is this detrimental and should I avoid doing it in the future? I always thought that it was good maintenance to crank it over to keep the oil flowing.
                          "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
                          R.W. Emerson

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                          • #14
                            I don't see any harm in that, although it WILL take several bursts of more than 5 Seconds to circulate the Oil and get the Pressure up.

                            What you do not want to do over the Winter or during long storage, is start the engine and not fully warm it up, it is best to DRIVE it at least 3 to 5 Miles or more and get it up to operating Temp.
                            StudeRich
                            Second Generation Stude Driver,
                            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                            • #15
                              Rich,
                              You know as well as I this past winter din't give us dry, snowless highways to drive. I'll never just start it to warm it up but I always thought that by cranking it over for 5 - 10 seconds was enough to circulate the oil.
                              "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
                              R.W. Emerson

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