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Oil Galley Plug Fun!!!

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  • Oil Galley Plug Fun!!!

    It never fails that something always pops up when working on 50+ year old stuff. Someone had tried to remove these galley plugs at one time and left me perfectly round holes instead of something a hex head socket would fit into. So, out with the mig welder to attach nuts onto the plugs. The first one at the rear of the engine went easy enough. The second one, hidden behind the freeze plug, well not so easy. It took a few tries to get a nut welded on. Surprisingly, the small ones and the rear of the engine oil galley came out without too many problems.
    This block had been dipped in a 55 gallon drum of industrial cleaner and soaked for a few days, then into the "dishwasher" high pressure cleaner. Once I got the galley plugs out, I ran a brush down the lifter galleys. I was amazed and the amount of nasty crud that came out. back into the dishwasher for another round of washing, then to the boring bar.
    If it wasn't for the cleaning and prep work, building engines would be a lot more fun. Oh, the rocker arm shafts were so nasty, I had to almost drive the cleaning brush through them.
    Attached Files
    Jamie McLeod
    Hope Mills, NC

    1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
    1958 Commander "Christine"
    1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
    1955 Commander Sedan
    1964 Champ
    1960 Lark

  • #2
    welding a nut works good. I had the same thing happen and just drilled a hole in the center of them, heated them a little and used a easy out.

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    • #3
      Welding a nut on definitely works but I've had great success using a Gator Grip socket on those plugs.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by starliner62 View Post
        Someone had tried to remove these galley plugs at one time and left me perfectly round holes instead of something a hex head socket would fit into. So, out with the mig welder to attach nuts onto the plugs. The first one at the rear of the engine went easy enough. The second one, hidden behind the freeze plug, well not so easy. It took a few tries to get a nut welded on. Surprisingly, the small ones and the rear of the engine oil galley came out without too many problems.
        We just start with the hot wrench. If the square hole is still there, heating the area red hot is usually enough to loosen them.
        Originally posted by starliner62 View Post
        If it wasn't for the cleaning and prep work, building engines would be a lot more fun.
        For true! That's what I say to my machinist every day; When it's all finally disassembled and clean, the machine work and assembly is cake.

        Watching those videos of NASCAR team clean rooms and the Corvette engine assembly area is a different world. Working with clean, new parts seems like cheating.

        jack vines
        Last edited by PackardV8; 03-23-2019, 06:19 PM.
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          All the plugs on my 60+ year old engines are square, so I bought a square socket set (sometimes called 4 point) to remove them.

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