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Priming sandblasted Frame

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  • Priming sandblasted Frame

    I've sandblasted my 51 2R5 frame. Will a quart of epoxy primer along with a quart of reducer paint the frame. I'm using a HVLP sprayer. Thanks

  • #2
    I think it'll be close. I may have used a little more, or even 2 when I did mine, but brushed it.

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    • #3
      Most paints have 'coverage' listed. The most important thing is the Mil spec. You may have enough to paint the frame, but is it thick enough to protect it ? I'd say no.

      You can do rough math, frame is 3.5 tall, flanges 2.5 , 2.5 x length, then x 2 = lots of square inches. If you coat everything good including edges, you will run out.

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      • #4
        Don't worry about it, just buy a gallon set up. The product is cheaper per ounce that way and you're going to need more for other parts in the near future anyway. Check online prices and you will probably pay less for a gallon set up then for 2 quarts at a paint store.
        Painting a frame wastes a lot of paint due to blow by compared to a flat surface where all the paint goes onto the panel you are painting.
        sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
        1950 Champion Convertible
        1950 Champion 4Dr
        1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
        1957 Thunderbird

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        • #5
          Thunderations is correct, There is no greater waste of paint than when you are 'gunning' a frame, small parts or anything not large and flat....... The biggest waste of paint you will ever see is doing a roll bar, or tubes like a race chassis HVLP or not

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          • #6
            biggest waste of paint I ever had was doing a ladder rack for a 8' box pickup. with epoxy you should have anywhere from 1 1/4 qts to 2 qts after adding activator depending on brand mix ratio. Some you can reduce and some you can't.

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            • #7
              If you use a good quality chassis paint, you really don't need primer. I know a lot of guys on here are going to disagree. However, one of the purposes of primer is to give the paint something to bond to. With the "tooth" you created with the sand blaster, you really don't need it. I used Bill Hirsh chassis paint on my 69 Z/28 frame painted directly onto the sandblasted metal, and don't have one chip on it, except where I bumped into a parking block (doh).

              Your car, your money. Just sharing my experience.

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              • #8
                My opinion is that a thin coat of epoxy primer will minimize the risk of corrosion and improve the adhesion of the paint. The important thing is not to skimp on the paint -use plenty of it.
                Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
                See more of my projects at stilettoman.info

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                • #9
                  Thanks Guys, I went to an automotive paint store in Roanoke Va. yesterday an bought a gallon of Acrylic Modified Alkyd Enamel. The guy was real helpful, you got to listen to someone, he said to paint right over the blasted frame with this stuff. so, got a gallon an it's going on today. James T. Davis paint in Roanoke.

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                  • #10
                    This is the most durable stuff I have found. You can literally hit it with a hammer after it's cured and not damage it. Direct to metal is fine. (no rust needed like poor 15).
                    http://magnetpaints.com/underbody.asp
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      Too wet & cool to paint around here.....and it looks like on & off rain for the next 2 weeks.....my hopes of a dry winter sure went down the tubes.....

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                      • #12
                        Not good painting weather here also, but yesterday it got to 70, so I went ahead and brushed on a thin coat, just to get some paint on it before it started to rust. The ceiling in my shop sweats on cold mornings and I figured I had to do something. It looks to be awhile before I'll have a decent day to spray on a 2nd coat. The acrylic enamel was very thin and I see that when I do spray it'll be a challenge not to get runs. I'm not building a show truck and it is only the frame.

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                        • #13
                          why not black por-15?

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                          • #14
                            POR, I believe ,stands for paint over rust. I've got bare metal

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                            • #15
                              Unless you are planning on one of those show exhibits where people put mirrors and lights under their vehicles...just slather the paint on. The main purpose is to seal the bare metal from oxygen. Whether moist or dry, oxygen is the catylist for rust. I have even used those flea market siphon type so called "engine cleaner" air guns to blast paint inside doors for getting to areas hard to reach with a conventional spray gun, or even to gain access to paint with a brush. Seal away the air/oxygen and rust stops.
                              John Clary
                              Greer, SC

                              SDC member since 1975

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