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What is that rattle??

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  • What is that rattle??

    Just dismantled the drivers side door on a 57 Packard. I found a non Studebaker push rod in the door.. I'm quite sure no one has beeen in there since 1957. When in college I had a 59 Hawk and lived about a block from the Studebaker -Buick dealer. On one trip over there a mechanic told me that he had finally found the rattle in a new Buick. The owner had brought the car in several times and they finally tore the right front door apart. Inside the door they found a wrench with a note attached--"You finally found the pesky rattle" I'm sure it wound not be above tossing a few extra parts into a car---especially one that wasn't sposed to rattle!

  • #2
    My neighbor had a similar experience with a '65 Chrysler he bought brand new, but I don't think it was intentional on the assembly line worker. I mentioned his experience with an unexplained noise here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...n-line-hijinks

    Craig

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    • #3
      Really? An Engine Push Rod? Where would a Body Line or Final line Assembler get an ENGINE Part?

      Those two procedures happened in Different buildings!

      You have to REALLY stretch your Imagination to come up with a Story like:
      an Engine Mechanic was sent to the final line to repair a balky Engine on a Car on the line, and a Push Rod fell out of his pocket and was picked up by a "smart Alec" Guy fitting the Door Panels who thought it would be cool to add a little rattle to someone's Car.
      Last edited by StudeRich; 01-18-2019, 07:12 PM.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        My '62 Hawk rattles all over the place. I have yet to find anything that will stop the rattles. The hood shakes, doors rattle, rear section rattle, and I could go on. Very discouraging. Doors have been rebuilt, new rubber every where and rattles still dominate the drive; forgot to mention new rubber between body and frame. I had a '53 C/K and none of the aforementioned. UGH

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        • #5
          My brother worked at an Olds dealer. He told me they've found loose nuts and bolts thrown into a frame and welded in. They found a Coke bottle on a string inside a fender with a note, " How long did it take you guys to find this?" ALL the rockers run all the way down on a 3.8L V6, no compression right off the delivery truck. They had to push it off the transport. One engine was missing 3 pistons. I don't know how they passed final inspection. Not to mention all the regular warranty work they had to do on the diesel Olds 350 engines. Pallets of them being returned to the factory. Late 70's early 80's were dark days for GM, some of it deserved. I own two today and a Ford.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Topper2011 View Post
            My brother worked at an Olds dealer. He told me they've found loose nuts and bolts thrown into a frame and welded in. They found a Coke bottle on a string inside a fender with a note, " How long did it take you guys to find this?" ALL the rockers run all the way down on a 3.8L V6, no compression right off the delivery truck. They had to push it off the transport. One engine was missing 3 pistons. I don't know how they passed final inspection. Not to mention all the regular warranty work they had to do on the diesel Olds 350 engines. Pallets of them being returned to the factory. Late 70's early 80's were dark days for GM, some of it deserved. I own two today and a Ford.
            I think the worst two from a dealership that I worked at were a Coke bottle on a string in a rear quarter panel and an engine that had one piston & rod missing.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #7
              I worked in a Japanese dealership and they were pretty good. The only funny one I remember was a new car, during PDI, had one 4 lug wheel on a 5 lug car. The assembler must have picked up a 4 lug front strut instead of the 5 lug one. The rep had a great time laughing about that one. Unfortunately, it was one of the models assembled in the US.

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              • #8
                I worked 30 years in Lansing's Fisher Body/Oldsmobile Body Plant '68-'98. Was proud of my job and my Body by Fisher craftsmanship, and did every build operation as if it were going to be mine.
                In 1977 The Olds Cutlass stood in third place in national sales, I bought a new bright red Vista Cruiser 3 seat wagon, fully loaded and 403, got 19 mpg with it on our first vacation. Totally trouble free pass 100k miles. (The last showroom new automobile we have thus far purchased for our own use)
                In 1978 things went down hill big time with the downsizing. But it wasn't actually the reduction of the size of the vehicle that created so many of the problems, following that changeover management/labor relations deteriorated as the 'higher powers' began pushing trouble prone robotics, and often ridiculous work loads.
                Then, as if our difficulties weren't bad enough, we started receiving truck loads of thousands of defectively manufactured sub-assemblies sourced from Mexico, Japan, and God alone knows where else. Thousands of defective or utterly unusable parts every day, yet we were commanded to use them and keep that line running, 60 cars an hour.
                Pile on with "It's not your fathers Oldsmobile" perhaps one of stupidest gaffs in advertising history, embarrassing millions of loyal Oldsmobile customers, and persuading no one that had their mind set on purchase of a foreign make. I saw the handwriting on the wall.

                THEN things -really- got crazy. Wallah! we became 'Lansing Car Assembly', tasked with building the Olds Achiva, Pontiac GrandAm, and Buick Skylark all mixed together at random on the same line, although engineered by different Divisions and requiring similar but different sub assemblies that were not functionally interchangeable between makes.
                Example door lock mechanisms. Power and manual, same mounting screw pattern, but different internally for each make. Thus within one minute the employee was expected to determine the Make by the 'manifest' affixed to the cowl, select the correct locking mechanism from among the several different pallets, install in each door on that side of the vehicle, driving either the 3 or 6 retaining screws, _that is if possible, as many of the foreign sourced screws would either strip or refuse to fully drive.
                Managements answer to that problem was, return to your workbench and fill out a 'Repair Notice' and tape it to the cowl of the vehicle (which by that point would be 30 ft or more on down the line and in the next operators work area) A whole lot of 'Lucy in the candy factory' going on. There were times that the only thing the worker could do was run, toss parts in the next car, or next COUPLE of cars just to get out of the next workers area.
                Then back to that interchangeable but different, about 2 hours latter, after the door glass was installed it would be discovered if a Pontiac door latch had been mistakenly installed in a Buick or vice-versa, which required removing the window to do the exchange.
                Just one example. I won't go into the ridiculous 4 ring circus that was headliner selection build-up and installation.
                Not tough enuff? Yea! we get to add the Chevy Cavalier.
                I thank that God I fell out of a tree during model changeover of 1998. Was still waking up with the nightmares of getting down the Line a decade after.
                Fisher Body Lansing Plant is all bull dosed flat now.

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                • #9
                  Click image for larger version

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ID:	1724978I once owned a 60s Valiant and this ballpein hammer was inside the drivers door, the panel had never been off before therefore it had to have been in there at the factory. It is a BRADES #1773 MADE IN ENGLAND. I have had the hammer for over 50 years now. The only ident is some white paint on the handle near the head. It didn't rattle but an interesting find. It was the only part on the car that didn't leak.

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                  • #10
                    A good Studebaker friend of mine worked at the chrysler plant in Evansville, In in the late fifties. He used to say "thank god we weren't building submarines....these things leaked really bad."

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                    • #11
                      i had a quite maddening rattle and I must have used all my Gorilla tape and a dozen or so tie wraps all to no avail. luckily the oh-so-expert folks knew it was that rod under the hood which runs parallel to the rear hood edge. There are supposed to be bumpers on them to prevent rattling, and after trying some different fixes, I used some foam pipe insulation and my last scraps of tape and voila, rattle gone! Now if I could just figure out how to get that rattling sound out of my head, along with the ringing, roaring, and screaming noises...
                      peter lee

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                      • #12
                        This isn't a factory incident, I don't think, but it is in the same vein of finding unexpected things in unexpected places.
                        A few years back I bought a 1941 Studebaker to build a street rod (or so I thought). In looking through the papers I found that it had been titled to a person in 1983, and there was a name and address. A quick call to information and I had a telephone number. Of course I had to call the number and got the person whose name was on the title
                        She said that her father had bought the car, new, for her mother. It was placed in her (the daughter's) name when her mother went into a nursing home.
                        The car was in much better condition than I had assumed so I decided to keep it stock. I was in the pit adjusting and bleeding the brakes. A fifteen year old boy who was living with us at the time was in the car prowling and pumping the brakes when I needed it.
                        He asked me if I hadn't said that the car had always been owned by a little ole librarian. I told him that was what her daughter said. He then said, "Well, reckon why this was under the seat?" and handed me down an empty condom pack.

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                        • #13
                          OOOOOh Dirty Librarian! LMAO

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                          • #14
                            When I was young we lived in Reseda, California, not too far from the Fisher Body plant in Van Nuys so I new a few guys who worked there. One of them told me one day that it was not uncommon for assembly line workers to toss things inside car doors. Often it would be a bottle top from their drink, or the empty bottle. One guy brought in a pair of old stinky tennis shoes that he was getting rid of and tossed them in. No rattle maybe, but, what is that strange odor?
                            Ed Sallia
                            Dundee, OR

                            Sol Lucet Omnibus

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                            • #15
                              ...busted up the "concrete" floor in the bathroom of our 90-ish year old house, and found a VERY dried out ham or beef leg joint buried in the mix.
                              Probably the guy's lunch?
                              Had the man who redid the floor throw in back into his mix.

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