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  • #16
    The ad does not mention the rear axle ratio. Find that out be for you go any further. Is it set up as a drag car or a road car?

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    • #17
      I'll just chime in as an owner and driver of an original SBC 1966 Daytona. The Mckinon engine is lighter then the Studebaker V8 making the steering and handling much nicer. Parts are mostly available at any auto parts store on a Sunday afternoon if you do happen to need a replacement.
      If you're OK with less then 200 HP it will probably run forever and give you great service, as is.
      If you want to fly the little Studebaker, a SBC can be built to over 1000 hp now days. Somewhere in the middle can be done without breaking the bank and provide a lot of fun.
      Please remember that increased HP requires better brakes and good suspension. Adding a bigger front anti-sway bar would be recommended and adding a rear anti-sway bar would be an improvement.
      Transmission choices behind the SBC are nearly endless from AOD's, various other automatics and 3,4,5 and 6 speed sticks that can be bolted on.
      Speaking of "bolting on", there are numerous cosmetic and performance items that are readily available for the SBC.
      sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
      1950 Champion Convertible
      1950 Champion 4Dr
      1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
      1957 Thunderbird

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      • #18
        From the seller:

        I purchased the car from a 90yr old WWW 2 veteran who had bad diabetes and was unable to pass his last dmv eye test.From what he told me he was friends with the guy who did the build who passed away soon after it was finished.His widow sold it to him.The motor is a 71(I have not run the #s)do not know the yr of the trans or the 9" I was told it had a 4:11and the veteran had a 3:50 installed.He offered me the 4:11 ring&pinion but I had no use for them.

        The car has the stock door pillar/body supports.It doesn't have a custom bellhousing structural replacement crossmember.Sorry.The trans has a custom tailshaft crossmember.Thanks

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        • #19
          Originally posted by drpreposterous View Post
          From the seller:

          I purchased the car from a 90yr old WWW 2 veteran who had bad diabetes and was unable to pass his last dmv eye test.From what he told me he was friends with the guy who did the build who passed away soon after it was finished.His widow sold it to him.The motor is a 71(I have not run the #s)do not know the yr of the trans or the 9" I was told it had a 4:11and the veteran had a 3:50 installed.He offered me the 4:11 ring&pinion but I had no use for them.

          The car has the stock door pillar/body supports.It doesn't have a custom bellhousing structural replacement crossmember.Sorry.The trans has a custom tailshaft crossmember.Thanks
          The 3.50 rear gear is about the perfect cruise and performance compromise. It sounds like the center section of the crossmember was cut out. A little fabrication will cure that. A 71 350 will have 8.5:1 compression with hard exhaust seats for unleaded fuel. Block hugger headers will fit the chassis and a 2 1/2" exhaust system is possible thereby eliminating the side pipes. Not a bad car.
          james r pepper

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          • #20
            Thanks, everyone! Sharp replies, one and all!

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            • #21
              Looks like fun!
              1952 Studebaker Champion Starliner
              1953 Studebaker Champion Starliner
              1965 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
              1967 Mercedes 250SL

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              • #22
                Originally posted by drpreposterous View Post
                It's been several years since I had the privilege of owning and driving a wonderful '60 Lark. it was my first, and thus far, only Stude. After foolishly selling it, I find myself more and more wanting the Stude experience again. But unlike many of you, I haven't put in time and effort under hoods and on creepers in my life. I'm a darn good nurse, just not a wrench man, and at my age (59) unlikely to change that.

                That, of course, makes the prospect of owning a Stude without racing to the poorhouse a dubious enterprise. But the itch wants scratching. (1) Is it crazy to figure my local shop (which admirably kept my '60 in shape), would be able to help me keep an SBC powered Daytona going?

                https://duluth.craigslist.org/cto/d/...745639486.html

                I've heard countless times, that rodded cars make for difficult maintenance. Then again, McKinnon small blocks were quite a smooth fit for '65-66 Lark types. If I were to get this Daytona, I'd ditch the side pipes and put the bumpers back on, among other things. (2) While conceding that an SBC drivetrain detracts from the full Stude experience, I've been telling myself the familiarity of the drive train might actually aid my guys at the shop. Am I kidding myself? The mike is yours...
                I've had that itch since I was a kid riding in my grandpa's Lark and his TransStars along with his Detroit Diesel and flatbed; only took a few decades to finally scratch it haha. re: the bolded/numbered areas: (1) Having a slight misfire in the 283 and doing as much as I could on my own after browsing forums, a local shop sorted the issue out. They said that they have had Studes there in the past but the GM motor is certainly easier as far as getting parts (that they're willing to put their labor warranty behind and not having to find NOS or McGyver something made for another car) but also the comfort level of their techs. He said the majority of his techs are car guys and a SBC is something they're pretty familiar with. (2)'Full Stude experience' depends on the driver and their relation to Studes. My grandpa had other makes' motors in his pickups, didn't detract from the experience. My tie to Studebaker is a sentimental one for how it shaped my family and the memories associated with them in relation to my family. While I certainly appreciate the engineering and design, that is second to the sentimental value; call it a ChevyBaker, sacrilege (haha, everyone's been really nice actually), I call it rolling childhood memories.

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                • #23
                  Well said!

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