Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Clock shock treatment at the Studebaker dealer........

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Clock shock treatment at the Studebaker dealer........

    I know folks have been converting their clocks to quartz movements, but back in the day when my clock stopped working, the Studebaker dealers service dept would employ a nifty little maneuver to get it started.
    A wire would be run from the battery directly to the back of the clock........presto.............clock started to work.....I remember the mechanic telling me that I could do it myself and save the service fee..........you know the service manager was NOT within earshot!

    Anyway I have attempted to get my clock working again after over 40 years of being dead.........no dice:-(
    Can anyone tell me why this maneuver used to work, and now fails to???

  • #2
    You might try taking the case off and thoroughly cleaning out the clock, then oiling it with a light oil, then try starting it again.

    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith
    Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

    Comment


    • #3
      What studeclunker said X2. Just did this with a '57 F%$& clock. Sprayed the gears with an a cleaner, I think it was an electronics cleaner. Let it dry and then dribbled oil on the gears. Let it sit for a few hours for the excess oil to drip off, and it fired right up. Good luck

      Comment


      • #4
        open case.....soft spray with electrical contact cleaner......file points......drip "watch oil" (@ jewelers) with an open paper clip on all gear contacts (only).....connect clock terminal to power source (battery charger @ trickle works)...ground case .......wiggle around just a little bit.....monitor progress with occasional wiggling.....let run for 10+ hours.....clean glass.....re-assemble.....drive car.....!! [you may need small needle nose pliers to hold adjuster as you twist off CCW]

        Comment


        • #5
          Agree, only "watch oil" should be used to lube clocks. I was taught years ago that most clock failures were due to cars setting too long with batteries low on voltage. The clock works by "re-winding" itself every so often. As the spring winds down, a set of points close which activates a sort of electro magnet which re-winds the spring. (you've probably heard that little "zip" sound they make if your setting in the car without the motor running). If the battery voltage goes down, there's not enough power to energize the the electro magnet to snap the points back open & they start to arch & pit. Eventually they can't conduct enough current to run anymore.

          I always take the clock fuse out if I'm not going to drive the cars for a while.
          Mike Sal

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mike Sal View Post
            Agree, only "watch oil" should be used to lube clocks. I was taught years ago that most clock failures were due to cars setting too long with batteries low on voltage. The clock works by "re-winding" itself every so often. As the spring winds down, a set of points close which activates a sort of electro magnet which re-winds the spring. (you've probably heard that little "zip" sound they make if your setting in the car without the motor running). If the battery voltage goes down, there's not enough power to energize the the electro magnet to snap the points back open & they start to arch & pit. Eventually they can't conduct enough current to run anymore.

            I always take the clock fuse out if I'm not going to drive the cars for a while.
            Mike Sal
            Then you run afoul of the other nifty feature of car clocks: the fact that they auto-regulate when you manually set the hands. If you set the hands ahead, the auto-regulation mechanism acts to make the clock run faster; if you set the hands back, it makes the clock run slower. If the clock is in constant use, this makes great sense, and eventually it converges on the point where the clock keeps perfect time. For a collector car, it works badly. You park the car at 7:00 P.M., and take out the clock fuse. Two weeks later, you hop in the car at 11:00 A.M., pop the fuse back in, and set the hands to 11:00. Poor dumb mechanism thinks, "crap! I was four hours slow, well, that reset has sped me up some now, by golly."
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

            Comment


            • #7
              I have my clock on a switch so I can shut it off when the car is not in use for awhile. Since I only turn the clock on to impress people at car shows keeping it regulated for accuracy is not a factor.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ya, most of the time I forget to put the fuse back in. It's in a 1950 champion so I don't mind letting it relax as long as it wants. I'll be retired next spring & will have more time to drive the car & keep the clock going.

                Comment


                • #9
                  After two repairs to the original electro-mechanical clock, I gave in to having a quartz movement installed. It may not have that satisfying "tick-tick" movement of the second hand that the original one had, but it has kept perfect time for over two years and the movement draws so little amperage you don't have to even think about it.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN1153.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	123.3 KB
ID:	1724200
                  Bill L.
                  1962 GT Hawk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Question............the wire coming off the wire harness that goes to the clock.....is it the standard "push-on" connector like the majority of harness connectors on the Avanti?
                    The parts manual shows only two 6/32 screws that hold the clock against the overlay studs.....no other hardware is called for.

                    Thanks in advance for the information

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Avanti clocks wire is a ring terminal and a very small nut holding it on. Brown wire .
                      Bez Auto Alchemy
                      573-318-8948
                      http://bezautoalchemy.com


                      "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Interesting Brad......no such thing delineated in the parts book? Also the brown wire appears to run directly down to the fuse block.
                        Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                        Avanti clocks wire is a ring terminal and a very small nut holding it on. Brown wire .
                        Last edited by Hawklover; 11-01-2018, 09:48 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Brad is that nut the same (6/32) nuts that hold the clock to the back of the dash overlay?
                          Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                          Avanti clocks wire is a ring terminal and a very small nut holding it on. Brown wire .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I believe it is, or even possibly smaller.
                            Bez Auto Alchemy
                            573-318-8948
                            http://bezautoalchemy.com


                            "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the information!
                              Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                              I believe it is, or even possibly smaller.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X