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    I complained about my Daytona being the hardest steering car I ever owned. Several forum members advised and suggested. Last week I had a flat on that old front tire and so I decided to get new fronts. Naturally they don't make 195/75 R 15s anymore so I have to get 205s. BUT they should not be mounted on Studebaker 4 and 1/2 inch wide rims. I found some 40273 (Ford wheels) and bought 205s.
    Suddenly with the right tire pressure and new tires the car handles beautifully. I just went on a 3 mile drive (from the tire store to home) and it was a different car.
    I know, some will say "I told you so" and you did.
    It takes a while for me to listen.
    But THANKS!

  • #2
    Good going, Art! Don't you just love it when a small change produces a big result [^]

    Actually, 205's MAY be a tad marginal on a 4 1/2" rim, but not terribly so. I have many thousands of miles on 205's on 4 1/2" rims on several Studes. If you want to be "by the book", yea a 5" rim is preferred, but I was never one to be by the book


    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

    Comment


    • #3
      Good going, Art! Don't you just love it when a small change produces a big result [^]

      Actually, 205's MAY be a tad marginal on a 4 1/2" rim, but not terribly so. I have many thousands of miles on 205's on 4 1/2" rims on several Studes. If you want to be "by the book", yea a 5" rim is preferred, but I was never one to be by the book


      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Comment


      • #4
        Upon my demise, I'm sure the entirety of SDC will heave a sigh of relief from my incessant preaching about tires mounted on too-narrow wheels, BUT UNTIL THAT TIME:

        The National Wheel & Rim Association (NWRA), the Trade Association for such matters, specifies the following ranges of wheel widths for the listed tire sizes:

        195: 5" - 7" wheel width

        205 and 215: 5 1/2" - 7 1/2" wheel width

        225: 6" - 8" wheel width

        Yes, that means all of us (myself included) are fudging when we put even 195 tires on 4 1/2" wide, original-issue Studebaker wheels, much less 205s and 215s. In reality, they also specify that a 4 1/2" wheel should have a tire no wider than 185(!) mounted on it.

        End of Sermon.

        (Now we'll pass the collection plate. Donations from today's collection will go toward the Petition to Cooper Tires to resume production of P195/75R15 radials for late-model Studebakers!) []

        Here's a developing, related story concerning the NWRA #40273 Ford-application wheels Art references; the ones that have been sold by Bob Helm through Turning Wheels for some time. That wheel is becoming obsolete and is more difficult to find than even a year ago. It is an excellent wheel for our late-model Studebakers, the only limitation being that you cannot use small Studebaker hub caps on it because the "nub" spacing is wrong.

        That wheel is also Hayes #82552. If you want good, appropriate, applicable new wheels to run 205 or 215 radials on your Studebaker, as Art has properly done, you are well-advised to find and buy them now. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Upon my demise, I'm sure the entirety of SDC will heave a sigh of relief from my incessant preaching about tires mounted on too-narrow wheels, BUT UNTIL THAT TIME:

          The National Wheel & Rim Association (NWRA), the Trade Association for such matters, specifies the following ranges of wheel widths for the listed tire sizes:

          195: 5" - 7" wheel width

          205 and 215: 5 1/2" - 7 1/2" wheel width

          225: 6" - 8" wheel width

          Yes, that means all of us (myself included) are fudging when we put even 195 tires on 4 1/2" wide, original-issue Studebaker wheels, much less 205s and 215s. In reality, they also specify that a 4 1/2" wheel should have a tire no wider than 185(!) mounted on it.

          End of Sermon.

          (Now we'll pass the collection plate. Donations from today's collection will go toward the Petition to Cooper Tires to resume production of P195/75R15 radials for late-model Studebakers!) []

          Here's a developing, related story concerning the NWRA #40273 Ford-application wheels Art references; the ones that have been sold by Bob Helm through Turning Wheels for some time. That wheel is becoming obsolete and is more difficult to find than even a year ago. It is an excellent wheel for our late-model Studebakers, the only limitation being that you cannot use small Studebaker hub caps on it because the "nub" spacing is wrong.

          That wheel is also Hayes #82552. If you want good, appropriate, applicable new wheels to run 205 or 215 radials on your Studebaker, as Art has properly done, you are well-advised to find and buy them now. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Bob is correct (as usual [^]). But I don't follow ALL of Bob's advice (just most of it).




            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

            Comment


            • #7
              Bob is correct (as usual [^]). But I don't follow ALL of Bob's advice (just most of it).




              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

              Comment


              • #8
                I always follow Mr. Palma's advice especially when engineering types agree. There is another reason I bought the new wheels and even though I have no engineering experience it makes sense to me.
                Studebaker wheels were designed for bias ply tires. Bias ply tires flex differently than radials. If you're just travelling in the odd parade, fine use whatever wheel and tire you like. But when you drive a Studebaker like I do on a daily basis and often above posted speed limits (I believe every one of my cars in the past 30 years has hit 100 miles per hour) then I feel I should have proper wheels and proper tires.
                And I had no idea it would make SUCH an improvement in the handling.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I always follow Mr. Palma's advice especially when engineering types agree. There is another reason I bought the new wheels and even though I have no engineering experience it makes sense to me.
                  Studebaker wheels were designed for bias ply tires. Bias ply tires flex differently than radials. If you're just travelling in the odd parade, fine use whatever wheel and tire you like. But when you drive a Studebaker like I do on a daily basis and often above posted speed limits (I believe every one of my cars in the past 30 years has hit 100 miles per hour) then I feel I should have proper wheels and proper tires.
                  And I had no idea it would make SUCH an improvement in the handling.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You guys are scaring me, I've got 215's on my speedster original rims and well shoot, it's been that way for 130,000 miles!! I'm not promoting such things, just pointing out that you're making me a bit nervous.

                    Now I'm not a mechanical engineer but what is the load transfer to the rim on bia's vs radial....I was under the impression that bias tire walls are stiffer (as can be readily felt when driving and the reason why 18-wheeler truck tires use them) versus radial that flex and absorb. Simple physics dictate that the bias tire would be harsher or rougher on rims, simply due to them transferring more shock energy, vs a radial that flexes more and absorbs some of that energy. Hence, when bias rims get radial tires they actually get less stress and contrary to popular belief are less likely to split a rim. Anyone like to clarify me on this issue?

                    Best Regards,
                    Eric West
                    "The Speedster Kid"
                    Sunny Northern California
                    Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
                    And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
                    55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
                    55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)
                    Best Regards,
                    Eric West
                    "The Speedster Kid"
                    Sunny Northern California
                    Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
                    And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
                    55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
                    55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You guys are scaring me, I've got 215's on my speedster original rims and well shoot, it's been that way for 130,000 miles!! I'm not promoting such things, just pointing out that you're making me a bit nervous.

                      Now I'm not a mechanical engineer but what is the load transfer to the rim on bia's vs radial....I was under the impression that bias tire walls are stiffer (as can be readily felt when driving and the reason why 18-wheeler truck tires use them) versus radial that flex and absorb. Simple physics dictate that the bias tire would be harsher or rougher on rims, simply due to them transferring more shock energy, vs a radial that flexes more and absorbs some of that energy. Hence, when bias rims get radial tires they actually get less stress and contrary to popular belief are less likely to split a rim. Anyone like to clarify me on this issue?

                      Best Regards,
                      Eric West
                      "The Speedster Kid"
                      Sunny Northern California
                      Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
                      And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
                      55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
                      55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)
                      Best Regards,
                      Eric West
                      "The Speedster Kid"
                      Sunny Northern California
                      Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
                      And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
                      55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
                      55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Eric: Please read (or re-read, I hope!) Jim Pepper's treatise on the matter on Pages 21 and 22 of the April 2004 Turning Wheels. Jim is spot-on, and I cannot improve on his remarks.

                        OTOH, your 1955 Speedster probably has 5" wide wheels, so the problem is not as dramatic as it is with the 4 1/2" wheels that were almost universal (there are a few exceptions; very few) on Studebaker passenger cars from 1959 until the 1966 end of production. [8D] BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Eric: Please read (or re-read, I hope!) Jim Pepper's treatise on the matter on Pages 21 and 22 of the April 2004 Turning Wheels. Jim is spot-on, and I cannot improve on his remarks.

                          OTOH, your 1955 Speedster probably has 5" wide wheels, so the problem is not as dramatic as it is with the 4 1/2" wheels that were almost universal (there are a few exceptions; very few) on Studebaker passenger cars from 1959 until the 1966 end of production. [8D] BP
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Interesting... I've got 215/85-16 LT radials on my 1/2 Ton Transtar and it handles like a dream on the highway. [] [8D] Definitely has "armstrong" steering with the Ross steering box, but I don't think even 3" wide tires would cure that. [B)]

                            <h5>Mark
                            '57 Transtar
                            3E-6/7-122
                            </h5>
                            Mark Hayden
                            '66 Commander
                            Zone Coordinator
                            Pacific Can-Am Zone

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Interesting... I've got 215/85-16 LT radials on my 1/2 Ton Transtar and it handles like a dream on the highway. [] [8D] Definitely has "armstrong" steering with the Ross steering box, but I don't think even 3" wide tires would cure that. [B)]

                              <h5>Mark
                              '57 Transtar
                              3E-6/7-122
                              </h5>
                              Mark Hayden
                              '66 Commander
                              Zone Coordinator
                              Pacific Can-Am Zone

                              Comment

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