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Some 2R Interior Questions

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  • Some 2R Interior Questions

    Did the 2R5 truck interiors come with carpeting on the floor or rubber mats or both? And was it just on the floor or did it extend up across the back (behind the gas pedal etc)?

    I notice there are several colour options for the headliner. Was the headliner colour governed by the exterior colour or could you select it when ordering your truck? I need to replace mine and wonder what colour I should be using?

    Did the glove box inside the engine bay have foam padding around it, or was it just painted metal (mine has foam padding all around it)? Was there foam or padding placed on the ledge that runs across the firewall (mine does)?

    Couldn't find any original interior pictures. Thanks for the help.

  • #2
    I can show you lots of interior pictures when you stop in . The floors are all rubber .
    sigpic

    Home of the Fried Green Tomato

    "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

    1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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    • #3
      The interiors of 2R trucks were not color-keyed to anything. The first few years the seats and headliners were a medium brown. The later ones had tan seats with light gray headliners. The firewall insulation inside the cab is a separate piece. No padding or insulation under the hood.

      Interior color choices didn't begin until 1956.
      Skip Lackie

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      • #4
        So I need to get rid of the carpet, install rubber matting, install light grey headliner and remove the padding around the glove box under the hood.

        Anyone know where I can get a door stay for the passengers side? It seems to be missing and I can only find door stays for rear car doors.

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        • #5
          You asked how the 2R trucks were originally equipped, which I what I tried to answer. But it's your truck -- you should equip it any way you want. By door stay do you mean (what Studebaker called) a door check? They were the same L&R on the trucks: part number 652290 on early 2Rs and 653096 on later 2Rs. They are not interchangeable and depend on the size of the hole in the door. A lot of us have a mixture of early and late doors on our trucks and thus need one of each kind. I have a spare somewhere, but would need to know which one you need.
          Skip Lackie

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          • #6
            Thanks Skip. I would like to keep the truck as original as possible. I plan to use it as an actual farm truck (since I have a farm) and put the farm name on the doors.

            Yes, door stay and door check are the same thing I believe. I will take a picture and measure the hole size.

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            • #7
              if you do the rubber floor mat, paint the floors with a good rust killer and encapsulator before installation. The rubber tends to trap moisture.

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              • #8
                So I removed the carpet and underlay on the floor and under the seat. There are a number of indentations with holes in the floor (see first picture). What are these for and what am I missing? In the second picture, can I assume that the hole behind the accelerator pedal (red arrow) is where the kick down switch should be located for the overdrive?

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                • #9
                  Those are drain holes to help keep the floor boards dry , your floor looks exceptional .that hole below your gas pedal looks to be that someone put it there.
                  sigpic

                  Home of the Fried Green Tomato

                  "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

                  1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by my2R5 View Post
                    So I removed the carpet and underlay on the floor and under the seat. There are a number of indentations with holes in the floor (see first picture). What are these for and what am I missing? In the second picture, can I assume that the hole behind the accelerator pedal (red arrow) is where the kick down switch should be located for the overdrive?

                    [ATTACH=CONFIG]75936[/ATTACH]

                    [ATTACH=CONFIG]75937[/ATTACH]
                    There is nothing unique (to Studebaker) or unusual about the indentations or holes in these sheet metal pieces. It is a standard engineering process with multiple purposes. The holes serve as "dowel pin" locations that keep the metal piece in proper alignment during the stamping process. Indentations strengthen the panel. Locating the holes in the indentations will give a low point for moisture to drain. Sometimes the holes are plugged with loose fitting rubber plugs that will keep out dirt but still allow water to drain. There are some parts that get the dowel pins in certain parts where excess material is later trimmed off, but on floor pans, using them for more than one purpose improves efficiency.
                    That hole under the gas pedal shouldn't be there. Someone may have tried to put a kick down switch there, but the factory supplied switch would be a better solution. Modifications in the area of accelerator operations should be done with much caution in mind. The possibility of a hung up accelerator linkage could be very dangerous. I would plug that hole.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

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                    • #11
                      I have stamped sheet metal parts in an industrial application and the parts do use locating holes, but the straight row looks odd to me. now I guess I'll have to pull up my rubber mat and take a look.
                      Attached Files
                      sigpic

                      "In the heart of Arkansas."
                      Searcy, Arkansas
                      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                      1952 2R pickup

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                      • #12
                        The round depression would be a hole for master cylinder access on RHD trucks. Why there are three small holes in it is a bit of mystery.
                        Skip Lackie

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the assistance. Nice to know I don't have anything missing so far. I will plug up that one hole behind the accelerator. A PO also put carpeting on the back wall behind the seat that I need to remove. Probably for sound proofing I would guess.

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                          • #14
                            Those trucks can use all the soundproofing they can get -- though most of the noise comes from the front.
                            Skip Lackie

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                            • #15
                              Shiny original paint on the floor? That might be the nicest Stude truck cab I’ve ever seen.

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