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Nice 1964 Hawk

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  • Nice 1964 Hawk

    https://journal.classiccars.com/2018...baker-gt-hawk/

  • #2
    Why would you go backwards to a 259 in a car of that caliber?
    Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

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    • #3
      Ehh, I don't know. An 1864 GT Hawk would probably be commandeered by THEM D**M YANKEES and used as a scouting vehicle; perhaps with a mounted Winchester lever-action rifle for increased effectiveness.
      Last edited by Stude Shoo-wop!; 07-24-2018, 08:14 PM.
      Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

      1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
        Ehh, I don't know. An 1864 GT Hawk would probably be commandeered by THEM D**M YANKEES and used as a scouting vehicle; perhaps with a mounted Winchester lever-action rifle for increased effectiveness.
        NAA, why would they use Benjamin Tyler Henry's little repeating Winchester made rifle when they would be far more effective with Dr. Richard Gatling's new gun.
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Someone that writes about cars should know how to spell Brooks Stevens, or at least look it up.

          EDIT: I didn't look it up and hope that my memory is correct at this late hour after a long/tiring day.

          The 154 year old Hawk got my attention.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
            Ehh, I don't know. An 1864 GT Hawk would probably be commandeered by THEM D**M YANKEES and used as a scouting vehicle; perhaps with a mounted Winchester lever-action rifle for increased effectiveness.
            No Winchester lever action rifles until 1866. The Henry rifle was not a Winchester.

            The model 1866 Winchester was an improved Henry, as it had a loading gate on the right side of the receiver and a fore arm stock.
            Last edited by WinM1895; 07-24-2018, 11:39 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by WinM1895 View Post
              No Winchester lever action rifles until 1866. The Henry rifle was not a Winchester.

              The model 1866 Winchester was an improved Henry, as it had a loading gate on the right side of the receiver and a fore arm stock.
              Aye. Thanks for the correction! Hopefully, I can become as knowledgeable about guns as I am about cars.
              Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

              1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

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              • #8
                Wow! There is a post regarding the referenced GT.

                I'm guessing, like many others, a 259 was more readily available than a good 289. And, it's pretty certain its performance with either engine isn't going to taxed at this point.

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                • #9
                  This is typical of "Writers" who THINK they know things:

                  The Gran Turismo Hawk also was the car
                  into which Andy Granatelli placed the 289cid V8 with a large one topped by Paxton superchargers and set speed records on the Bonneville Salt Flats.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, I couldn't figure out what he was trying to say on that one either. I liked the Oklahoma rigging on the emergency brake cable though but I wish they would have wiped off the leaking anti-freeze on the bottom of the radiator before taking a photo that lets every potential buyer know they have a radiator repair in front of them. Maybe they were just being honest salesmen.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by WinM1895 View Post
                      No Winchester lever action rifles until 1866. The Henry rifle was not a Winchester.

                      The model 1866 Winchester was an improved Henry, as it had a loading gate on the right side of the receiver and a fore arm stock.
                      Yes and no. The Henry rifle was actually made by the "New Haven Arms Company", owned by Oliver Winchester. It was formed from the remnents of the "Volcanic Repeating Arms Co" which Winchester had taken over from Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson. Winchester hired Benjamin Tyler Henry, for whom the Henry rifle was named, as plant superintendant. While producing the Volcanic rifle (Oliver Winchester held the rights to) he improved it's amunition. Henry then improved the rifle to use it, he patented his improvement in 1860. Henry worked for Winchester and the rifle was produced by Winchester's company beginning in 1862. As firearms was a new venture for Winchester, he was leary of calling the new rifle a Winchester for fear of it's potential failure damaging his reputation. The rifle was called a Henry to distance it from the Winchester name. By 1866 the rifle had been well received and improvements were ready to put into production. The "New Haven Arms Co" was renamed "Winchester Repeating Arms Co" and the improved rifle was sold under the Winchester name as the model 1866.

                      While the Henry rifle is not "technically" a Winchester, it is actually the second rifle produced by Winchester's firearms company.

                      Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bensherb View Post
                        Yes and no. The Henry rifle was actually made by the "New Haven Arms Company", owned by Oliver Winchester. It was formed from the remnants of the "Volcanic Repeating Arms Co" which Winchester had taken over from Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson. Winchester hired Benjamin Tyler Henry, for whom the Henry rifle was named, as plant superintendant. While producing the Volcanic rifle (Oliver Winchester held the rights to) he improved it's ammunition. Henry then improved the rifle to use it, he patented his improvement in 1860. Henry worked for Winchester and the rifle was produced by Winchester's company beginning in 1862. As firearms was a new venture for Winchester, he was leery of calling the new rifle a Winchester for fear of it's potential failure damaging his reputation. The rifle was called a Henry to distance it from the Winchester name. By 1866 the rifle had been well received and improvements were ready to put into production. The "New Haven Arms Co" was renamed "Winchester Repeating Arms Co" and the improved rifle was sold under the Winchester name as the model 1866.

                        While the Henry rifle is not "technically" a Winchester, it is actually the second rifle produced by Winchester's firearms company.

                        Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming.
                        Oliver Winchester, a shirt maker, invested in the company, when it went broke, he took it over, eventually renamed it the Winchester Repeating Arms Co.

                        The caliber of the Henry and most model 1866 Winchesters was .44 Henry rimfire (aka .44 Henry flat).

                        The late model 1866's were chambered for the new .44 WCF, better known as the .44-40.

                        WinM1895 = Winchester model 1895 box magazine lever action rifle, that I've been collecting since 1961.

                        WACA L/M #88

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                        • #13
                          I recognized the screen name implication. Those large cartridge lever actions ('86, '95) are the only ones I don't have. Be well.
                          sigpic

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                          • #14
                            Is a car like this with the 259 really worth the asking price?
                            Joe Roberts
                            '61 R1 Champ
                            '65 Cruiser
                            Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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                            • #15
                              Only on the Studebakers Drivers Club Forum can one get details of mid 1800's differently produced rifles and various company ownership.
                              Back to the car in question... As per Joe I too wonder about the step backwards engine wise. For me also I simply would have to have such a nice looking car equipped with a floor mounted Hurst shifted T10 powered by a modified 289.
                              To each their own. Thanks for the post Bob.
                              Bill

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