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My Half A$$ Studebaker Rebuild

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  • #16
    I picked these up a few weeks ago on CL. Mid-80's Cherokee 15 x 6.



    I plan on putting 4 wheel discs and hoping these should work. As it stands, I believe they are hitting the large rear drums without a spacer for the hub. Since the disc sit proud of the axle, it should clear.

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    • #17
      That poor old GT sure has a lot rust for a California car. I have two Cali cars in the shop here, and neither has as much as a tenth of the rust you have there. The trailer hitch, if you want to remove it? A zip disc on an air-powered die grinder will cut that angle stock OK. Or a metal-cutting blade in a reciprocating saw. I just removed doors and hinges from a rusty '61 Hawk. I got most of the hinge screws out. The trick is to head the screw head cherry red with an acetylene torch, and then use the right Phillips bit in a ratchet handle as soon as it has cooled below red heat. It will either come right out, or the head will snap off (either of which was OK for my purposes).

      You are going to need a welder. One of those $110 wire-feed jobs from Harbor Freight will get the job done, but not in the neatest possible way. If you don't have an air compressor, and some air tools, add that to the list. Five horsepower, cast iron, oil-lubricated compressor is ideal. Avoid the oil-less ones; they are very noisy, and don't last.
      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gordr View Post
        That poor old GT sure has a lot rust for a California car. I have two Cali cars in the shop here, and neither has as much as a tenth of the rust you have there. The trailer hitch, if you want to remove it? A zip disc on an air-powered die grinder will cut that angle stock OK. Or a metal-cutting blade in a reciprocating saw. I just removed doors and hinges from a rusty '61 Hawk. I got most of the hinge screws out. The trick is to head the screw head cherry red with an acetylene torch, and then use the right Phillips bit in a ratchet handle as soon as it has cooled below red heat. It will either come right out, or the head will snap off (either of which was OK for my purposes).
        You are going to need a welder. One of those $110 wire-feed jobs from Harbor Freight will get the job done, but not in the neatest possible way. If you don't have an air compressor, and some air tools, add that to the list. Five horsepower, cast iron, oil-lubricated compressor is ideal. Avoid the oil-less ones; they are very noisy, and don't last.
        Yes, I'm surprised as well. I bought a Rover P5 3 Litre many years ago. I bought it from the son of the original owner. It had spent most of it's time in Pasadena and had sun rot of the rubber and interior. Once that happened, any amount of rain can come into the interior and rot the floors. The Rover only had two small spots of rot when it was stripped to bare metal. Never had an accident. I never did complete that car, but it was a running driving car. I did pick up a welder awhile ago.




        And my crappy welding with it.






        You should see the photos of the welding I left out. I did finally get rid of my 30+ year old Ingersoll Rand oiless compressor. I punished it on a frozen engine and needed a new piston assembly, about $49. I went for an oldie.



        1969 and runs well. I don't think I'll run out of air with this one. It's weighs a ton though.
        Last edited by Topper2011; 07-08-2018, 11:04 AM.

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        • #19
          I wouldn’t run it with the gas line connected - you’ll suck all the debris out of the tank through the entire fuel system & certainly plug up the carb.
          as for the trailer hitch, cut it off and get that tank out for a proper cleaning
          i once bought a mint 1981 VW Cabrio with 18k miles. It was an estate sale & the car had sat for many years. I Charged the battery, put gas in it & $1,000 later after a complete rebuild of the entire fuel system, it ran fine.

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          • #20
            Shop shop manuals can also be found very reasonably at Rock Auto

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            • #21
              Great project. It’s a lot to chew off for your first Studebaker. All the advice above is good. Tackle small projects first. It’s easy to get overwhelmed. I’m surprised Carl let you take his picture! Keep up the good work and take lots of pictures.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by abkco View Post
                Great project. It’s a lot to chew off for your first Studebaker. All the advice above is good. Tackle small projects first. It’s easy to get overwhelmed. I’m surprised Carl let you take his picture! Keep up the good work and take lots of pictures.

                He told me if I want to take a picture of the shop, he would charge me. If I took one with him in it, he would pay me.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Chartrain View Post
                  I wouldn’t run it with the gas line connected - you’ll suck all the debris out of the tank through the entire fuel system & certainly plug up the carb.
                  as for the trailer hitch, cut it off and get that tank out for a proper cleaning
                  i once bought a mint 1981 VW Cabrio with 18k miles. It was an estate sale & the car had sat for many years. I Charged the battery, put gas in it & $1,000 later after a complete rebuild of the entire fuel system, it ran fine.
                  I will be using a can and hose to feed a new fuel filter to the carb when I get a chance. I'm sure it will be loud on one side as the header pipe is broken off. I've got to get it out of the garage in case it goes wrong of course.

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                  • #24
                    Since I have gotten the build sheet from the Studebaker Museum, I am happy to say it has everything it was ordered with. Engine number matches and all the accessories match. It's a 4bbl V8 with 3 speed overdrive, white walls, TT, Desert Tan, reclining seats, tinted glass, PCV, undercoating, Climatizer, "RUSH" "SOLD" Ship Via ML NYC CBQ DRGW SP Milpitas Conv Destination Napa, CA

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                    • #25
                      Climatizer:





                      Passenger side floor with pin holes.





                      Driver's side.

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                      • #26
                        Those calipers and brackets "appear" to be 68-69 Mustang, They are a bit too much for a Studebaker, That's why I went to the GM intermediate calipers.

                        There is somewhere ONE set of brackets that will fit those calipers and brackets, but I do not know where!

                        Jim
                        "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

                        We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


                        Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

                        As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
                        their Memorials!

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                        • #27
                          As far as welding, get rid of the flux core wire and buy a bottle of gas. All welds will be at least 10 times nicer without even trying.

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                          • #28
                            I have an air compressor, motor and tank that looks like yours. I bought it used in the early 1970s. I thought that it was a homemade unit, but perhaps not. Right now, it needs a drive belt.
                            Gary L.
                            Wappinger, NY

                            SDC member since 1968
                            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
                              As far as welding, get rid of the flux core wire and buy a bottle of gas. All welds will be at least 10 times nicer without even trying.

                              Yep, that's what I keep hearing. I will before I start welding floors in the Hawk.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by studegary View Post
                                I have an air compressor, motor and tank that looks like yours. I bought it used in the early 1970s. I thought that it was a homemade unit, but perhaps not. Right now, it needs a drive belt.

                                It's a Sears compressor.
                                Attached Files

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