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  • Article about restomod of '54 Studebaker coupe

    Here's an interesting read and photo of restomodding a '54 coupe:
    http://driving.ca/auto-news/news/col...dify-a-classic

    What do you think this one will cost?

    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.

    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

  • #2
    About a quarter of a million dollars after you total up all of the labor, parts and materials (assuming build in a professional shop, not your garage).

    Even at the big time auctions, most recently restored cars sell at a small fraction of the restoration cost. If you can find what you want, it makes sense to buy one that is already done.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #3
      Just calculating the price for those parts made my head spin. That custom chassis is probably 25k. I don’t know what shape and completeness of the car was to start but hunting down the small pieces is incredibly time consuming.

      Comment


      • #4
        I was going to low ball my number until I saw the amount of Tim Horton's (darn good coffee BTW) they drink! Realistically with 2500 hours in labor and more for parts, the $300-400K sounds about right. My guess - $351,297.41.

        Bob
        , ,

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome to Canada....EH!
          Nearly every part to build a restomod in Canada has to be sourced in the US, so there's extra shipping and (sometimes) brokerage and then there's the 30% +/- in currency exchange then ever thing you buy here in Ontario had a "value" added tax of 13%. Shop time is going to get you at somewhere between $90 an $140 an hour. If you can find an upholstery shop willing to do it that will be a 2 year wait and in the end you'll have to shoot it with waterborn paint just to finish it off.

          Does anyone have the name of the couple willing to pay big money for a 54???
          I would gladly part with my 53 almost finished restomod for a quick 1/4 million even in Canadian Bucks.Engine 062017 002.JPG
          Bill Foy
          1000 Islands, Ontario
          1953 Starlight Coupe

          Comment


          • #6
            Way too much. Better off to save the money for gas and start enjoying the stock ride right away.

            That's a cool picture, and the first time I saw one so layed out. I'll have to send it to my rod friends.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've never understood spending that kind of money on any car. You could get 90% there with 20% of the money.
              sigpicsals54

              Comment


              • #8
                "I've never understood spending that kind of money on any car. You could get 90% there with 20% of the money."

                I am sure that fancy motor will go much faster than my 215 HP Skyline motor, but I thought the term Restomod implied something built for street use. All that money and no independent rear suspension?

                The chassis in the photo seems to have very small cross section rails - I can't believe it is as stiff in bending or torsion as the beefed up stock chassis we used. I have to assume the photo shows the chassis in the "before" condition.

                I think my 48 Champion will corner better, ride better and stop just as well. Certainly the Skyline power rack and pinion will steer as well as any aftermarket unit. I paid $2000 for a Skyline front clip, with engine, 5-speed trans, radiator, intercooler, power steering, complete front suspension with disc brakes, throttle, brake and clutch pedals, instruments, wire harness, engine computer and all accessories, driveshaft (which we lengthened ourselves), all with 35,000 miles on it. Another $300 for the independent Skyline rear suspension with limited slip and disc brakes, $300 for two sets of 17x7 Nissan alloy wheels with good tires, about $1200 for bumper and tail light rechrome, $500 for chassis and suspension powder coating, $600 for paint, primer, and body materials (obviously I did not go to House of Colors). I had never sprayed pearlescent paint, so I paid my body guy a very reasonable price to spray it after I did all the body and prep work. My $10,000 paint job cost me about $3000, and the entire project cost me about $30,000, including a fairly nice running and driving car that I started with. I also have about 2,000 hours of my time invested, which I figure is worth at least a dollar an hour.

                Of course not everyone has the skills to do the rust repair, body work, and detail fabrication that I did, and not everyone has the highly skilled fabrication help that I have with my friend Sean OBrien. If I didn't have those resources, I could have spent $85-100,000. But 300-400k is ridiculous unless you are restoring a Duesenberg. I believe if you are judicious in your choice of components, good used factory parts are at least as good as the aftermarket stuff.


                Skyline Front Clip.jpg

                Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
                See more of my projects at stilettoman.info

                Comment


                • #9
                  48skyliner- I like what you did to build your car. The key words are "what you did". At $100 per hour for a professional to do it for you, your car would then be $230,000. That is very close to the quarter of a million dollars that I previously estimated.
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 48skyliner View Post
                    "I've never understood spending that kind of money on any car. You could get 90% there with 20% of the money."

                    I am sure that fancy motor will go much faster than my 215 HP Skyline motor, but I thought the term Restomod implied something built for street use. All that money and no independent rear suspension?

                    The chassis in the photo seems to have very small cross section rails - I can't believe it is as stiff in bending or torsion as the beefed up stock chassis we used. I have to assume the photo shows the chassis in the "before" condition.

                    I think my 48 Champion will corner better, ride better and stop just as well. Certainly the Skyline power rack and pinion will steer as well as any aftermarket unit. I paid $2000 for a Skyline front clip, with engine, 5-speed trans, radiator, intercooler, power steering, complete front suspension with disc brakes, throttle, brake and clutch pedals, instruments, wire harness, engine computer and all accessories, driveshaft (which we lengthened ourselves), all with 35,000 miles on it. Another $300 for the independent Skyline rear suspension with limited slip and disc brakes, $300 for two sets of 17x7 Nissan alloy wheels with good tires, about $1200 for bumper and tail light rechrome, $500 for chassis and suspension powder coating, $600 for paint, primer, and body materials (obviously I did not go to House of Colors). I had never sprayed pearlescent paint, so I paid my body guy a very reasonable price to spray it after I did all the body and prep work. My $10,000 paint job cost me about $3000, and the entire project cost me about $30,000, including a fairly nice running and driving car that I started with. I also have about 2,000 hours of my time invested, which I figure is worth at least a dollar an hour.

                    Of course not everyone has the skills to do the rust repair, body work, and detail fabrication that I did, and not everyone has the highly skilled fabrication help that I have with my friend Sean OBrien. If I didn't have those resources, I could have spent $85-100,000. But 300-400k is ridiculous unless you are restoring a Duesenberg. I believe if you are judicious in your choice of components, good used factory parts are at least as good as the aftermarket stuff.


                    [ATTACH=CONFIG]73282[/ATTACH]

                    Your Champion is breathtakingly gorgeous. And I love the entire build. But I'd argue that had you not had the skill sets you have and the resources you had, there would have been other methods and means for you to arrive at or near the same ends.
                    My 54 Coupe is eventually going to get a suspension clip in the front and rear with air ride suspension. I've developed relationships with "guys" who are more capable than myself in accomplishing these tasks. So, its not my fault, (and nor is it yours), that some of us have access to these things.
                    But even if I hadn't had these connections, I'd still be able to build my car to certain standards far, far below the astronomical costs we see above. A stock Stude frame, with mild reinforcements can withstand a lot of horsepower. There have been many suspensions which have been used in Studes for many decades also. Jag front and rear suspensions have been incorporated in years past. Corvettes also. Mike VV has installed C4 Vette suspension. And even if you kept it stock, it can be built and rebuilt to higher standards than stock with urethane bushings, disc brakes, big sway bars etc.
                    In fact, with my car lowered and having a 1-1/4" sway bar added up front, it handled far superior to any other Stude I ever drove.
                    Today, an LS engine/trans is a much easier and cheaper swap than it was just a few years ago. Motor and trans mounts can be bought from ebay for cheap, offering very inexpensive 400 HP upgrades. Shocks and springs can now be ordered for custom rates.
                    Anyway, its all about networking and finding the deals that suit our purpose. I can go, right now and buy a 6.0 LS engine trans combo for less than a 289 rebuild and end up with more than twice the horsepower and 5 times the reliability. At the end of it, Id never find a drop of oil in the driveway.
                    I could go on and on, but I won't. Some here will argue over it regardless. And some will complain about losing the amazing and uncomparable virtues of the stock drivetrain. So, there you go.
                    sigpicsals54

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ah, who gives a flyin' flip what it costs. It's not required that everyone with an interest in Studes be a CASO. It looks like GREAT fun to me!!!

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