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  • Now What

    I purchased a 62 GT Hawk in 2002 and I have realized that my talents and working space are limited. The choice is send the car out for work or sell it. The car has had the breaks fixed and the bushings replaced.
    In summary the car needs a paint job to remove the blue paint, mount the new door and window gaskets, and repaint it a color close to Gunmetal Silver. I have talked to a couple of local paint shops who appear not happy with the prospect of blasting the old paint off, adjusting the doors, applying new paint, and mounting the gaskets.
    The wiring is original and should be replaced. The interior should be replaced.
    Anyone care to hazard an estimated cost for these repairs?
    Thanks

  • #2
    You didnt mention what quality you are looking for. Do you want a basic driver, a show car,
    or something that belongs at a Mecum auction? There is no definitive answer because
    costs will vary depending on where you live, state of the economy, etc. You will need to
    shop around. Make sure you get references and see examples of their work.

    I will hazard a guess for a driver.
    You could have the whole car soda blasted for probably $700-$1500.
    Adjust doors, paint, install gaskets for around $4000-6000 for a basic paint job.
    Remember that they wil usually remove trim and smooth out and fix all dings and defects.
    If you have rusted areas that need fixed, that will increase the cost.
    Triple that if you want a show quality paint job.
    Interior probably $2500-$5000 depending on quality and whats available.
    Wiring. Have no clue, but it is very labor intensive.

    You will be better off finding a good small one man body shop. They are usually cheaper and are
    willing to do more work. The bigger shops just want to do gravy insurance jobs. Stay away from
    "Restoration" shops because their hourly rate will kill you unless you can afford $100+ hourly labor.

    In my town, there are some small one man body shops that do fabulous work for $20/hour. There is also a high
    end restoration shop that wont even give you a quote. They tell you "We'll let you know what you owe us when we
    are done". They turn out perfect vehicles, but you pay dearly for it. Needless to say, they usually only work on rare, high value vehicles that will be worth a lot when finished.

    As you can see, this is why guys like us do as much of the work as possible.

    Just my opinion.

    Comment


    • #3
      The final cost will always be more than your GT will bring at time of sale.

      Do you love the car and plan on driving it for years?

      If not get out now and sell the dream.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

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      • #4
        "If not get out now and sell the dream." I agree, and the last thing you want is someone doing the work who don't want to... at any price.

        Comment


        • #5
          My thoughts are that you could sell the project car, then keep an eye out for a finished, running car, that you could maintain, and correct the small issues as they come up. It is fortunate that you realize your limitations now, instead of getting in over your head on a DIY project, that would be more difficult to sell later. I am just finishing a full restoration, but have gathered the tools, and experience, over a number of years, which made it more feasible. Good luck with your decision.

          Comment


          • #6
            And for goodness sake, dont tear it all apart and then decide that you dont want to do anything else.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
              My thoughts are that you could sell the project car, then keep an eye out for a finished, running car, that you could maintain, and correct the small issues as they come up. It is fortunate that you realize your limitations now, instead of getting in over your head on a DIY project, that would be more difficult to sell later. I am just finishing a full restoration, but have gathered the tools, and experience, over a number of years, which made it more feasible. Good luck with your decision.
              This is sound advice.
              Take the loss if you have to. Sometimes its best to cut your losses now, rather than taking a greater hit in the future.
              sals54

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              • #8
                If you decide to send the car to a body and paint shop choose one that is not intimated by the work to be done. If they hesitate they probably would not do a good job anyway. There are restoration shops out there that would love to have the opportunity to work on your car and the challenges it may present. The right shop attitude can make a big difference. If their heart isn't in it they will cut corners and take shortcuts that you will not be happy with.
                Ed Sallia
                Dundee, OR

                Sol Lucet Omnibus

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jeryst View Post
                  And for goodness sake, dont tear it all apart and then decide that you dont want to do anything else.
                  Amen to that!
                  RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                  17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                  10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                  10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                  4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                  5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                  56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                  60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                  • #10
                    agree to all the above...... now just don't ad insult to injury in your asking price....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I liken this decision to your Stock Broker saying:

                      OK we can invest in that if you want, HOW Much "EXPENDABLE" CASH DO YOU HAVE"?
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All:
                        Thanks, my basic idea is to make a daily driver. If that helps the conversation. Again all the comments are interesting.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by robeswan View Post
                          All:
                          Thanks, my basic idea is to make a daily driver. If that helps the conversation. Again all the comments are interesting.
                          This is one of the reasons the Studebaker Drivers Club is still adding new members. In a recent discussion at our local board meeting, our President and Tourmaster attending a meeting or two with other local clubs wanting to know how we are adding members while they were losing members. One salient fact was we enjoy our cars and when we can drive them. Other clubs seemed to be interested in shows and more judging of cars than anything else.

                          We have a new member that owns a Morgan. She is in the process of purchasing John Lewis's 50 Champion Starlight. She drove it to the board meeting and went the next day to the British club coffee in that car. She happened to see our cars at a function in April, pulled up and joined.

                          Get the car in safe running condition then work on it as you can. One of our members bought a 63 GT and then joined our chapter. She said she probably should have joined first but she drives her car when she can while doing work on it. Right now the front suspension is being rebuilt but it will be back with us. She has done little things to the body such as painting and putting strips on the wheels. She plans on sanding and finishing body work one panel at a time. Now when people see her car, they may think it is a refugee from a salvage yard, but Gloria is a proud of that car as if it was a 400 point winner.

                          Have fun and us resources in the club. On our SDC homepage there should be list of chapters in your area and don't be afraid to contact your Zone Coordinator for help and check where and when the Zone Meet will occur.

                          Keep Smiling.

                          Best Regards
                          Bob Miles
                          Different by Design
                          Different by Delight!
                          Pacific Southwest Zone Coordinator
                          Last edited by 6hk71400; 05-23-2018, 03:32 PM. Reason: corrections

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