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Recycled a TV and found a car part?

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
    That info fills a long held gap in my knowledge. Now, the other half of the gap is: Were there "A" batteries?
    -Dwight
    Yes there were. Most pre-war battery operated radios used both an 'A' battery and a 'B' battery: https://antiqueradio.org/bsupply.htm

    Craig

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
    That info fills a long held gap in my knowledge. Now, the other half of the gap is: Were there "A" batteries?
    -Dwight
    Plenty around. "A" batteries usually have some sequence of numbers after the "A" and are used in cameras and security systems. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Energizer...&wl13=&veh=sem

    Len

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  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Originally posted by oilnsteel View Post
    There were B batteries, Jerry. They were used to supply plate voltage for the vacuum tubes in old radios. Now you have more useless knowledge.
    That info fills a long held gap in my knowledge. Now, the other half of the gap is: Were there "A" batteries?
    -Dwight

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  • Noxnabaker
    replied
    One thing I don't use is plates from kitchen machines & such because they let go the paint easily & I think they're not coated/painted in a dry enough atmosphere, so the result will for sure be rustbubles later on, or maby rather soon enough.
    These things are for indoor use only & there it works.

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  • wittsend
    replied
    Back when computer cases were built like M1 tanks I would cut them into flat sheets and make repair panels for my cars.

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  • jimmijim8
    replied
    Originally posted by thunderations View Post
    So, here's the story. Daughter moving out of state has a non-op 65" LCD TV she needs disposed of. Dad says no problem, will drop it of at a recycle center.
    Well, as it seems, big TV's are not wanted at most recycle centers but Best Buy will recycle it for a $25 fee.
    Can you say CASO?
    Decided to do my own recycle and ripped the dang thing apart. Glass screen folded up nicely into the trash container, while the plastics broke into smaller pieces and into the recycle containers.
    As I was getting down to the metal frame that supports all this plastic and glass, my wife walks out and comments that it looks just like the patch panels for the Studebaker floors I had bought recently.
    BOOM, a light bulb went off. It may not be the perfect configuration and the reinforcing ridges may not be in the perfect spots, but it will work in some areas that just need to cover a hole.
    So, instead of spending $25 and a road trip, I now have several hundred dollars worth of patch panel material to fix a few problem areas with.
    Plus, it gave me about a half hour of pleasure just ripping something apart with no intention or desire of ever trying to put it back together again.
    Wonderful. cheers jimmijim

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  • thunderations
    replied
    The edges that are turned over at the corners are factory welded, so my guess is that it's weldable. This is just mild steel, not some magical alien space alloy from Area 51 or Rozewell. It was a SAMSUNG made in Mexico, nuff said.
    There's very few metals that are not able to be welded easily with the right rod/wire and gas. Even if it were a problem, you could use panel adhesive.
    Just a note: I'm not promoting the use of TV parts to fix your cars. Just pointing out something that is similar enough to floor pans that a CASO with a little imagination could spend an afternoon and modifying for use.
    Now, back to your regularly scheduled channel.
    Originally posted by thom View Post
    I would be surprised if that is metal that can be welded.

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  • ddub
    replied
    Originally posted by thom View Post
    I would be surprised if that is metal that can be welded.
    Who needs welding when you have pop rivets and fiberglass?

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  • thom
    replied
    I would be surprised if that is metal that can be welded.

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  • thunderations
    replied
    No, the other way around..............turning TV's into Studebakers. How ironic, huh? What goes around, comes around.
    Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
    Studebakers into tv's. Maybe the remote will start it now.

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    Studebakers into tv's. Maybe the remote will start it now.

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by oilnsteel View Post
    There were B batteries, Jerry. They were used to supply plate voltage for the vacuum tubes in old radios. Now you have more useless knowledge.
    More useless knowledge: they're still used in lanterns in Europe.

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  • Noxnabaker
    replied
    That sure it a good idea to use! Gotta get me one of those flat TV's now...

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  • Cash
    replied
    Oh no! They’re turning Studes into TV’S!!! Aaaaggghhh!

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  • thunderations
    replied
    That one was a 65" diagonal that quit working after 10 or 12 years. I'm moving an 85" one to my daughter in a week or so. If it fails at some time, might be able to replace a pick-up truck bed floor. Along with the metal there are several layers of plastic that shield the actual screen from this metal piece. One piece is about 1/8" thick and the other 2 are more like the stuff the foreign car owners use for side windows when theirs gets broken out.
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    That IS Cool! That's ONE BIG TV!

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