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Steel companies and Studebaker

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  • Steel companies and Studebaker

    Did Studebaker every have long term contracts or relationships with certain steel companies. Where did most of the steel come from? Pittsburgh or NW Indiana? Or did it vary as time went on?

  • #2
    I know Studebaker had it's own foundry and made some parts from their own steel.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

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    • #3
      When Matt Wendt restored his '64 GT Hawk, we found a Bethlehem Steel logo on the interior Door panel.
      Peter Bishop
      Director,
      Northeast Zone

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      • #4
        I think I remember it was a US Steel strike that slowed and or shut the 1955 Model Stude. line down at the end of 1954/beginning of 1955 in addition to a UAW Stude. strike also affecting Stude. Production.

        Also keep in mind that MOST of the Bodies, Frames, Wheels etc. of the Cars and Trucks were made by Budd Corp. so THEIR Steel Suppliers would be the Major ones.

        1955 was a TERRIBLE year for Studebaker Packard on top of all that, you had the Huge amount of ongoing part changes Plus the Mid-Run wrap around windshield Body change on Sedans and Wagons.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PeterHawk View Post
          When Matt Wendt restored his '64 GT Hawk, we found a Bethlehem Steel logo on the interior Door panel.
          Maybe from the Burns Harbor plant, just about 1/2 hour away from South Bend.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
            I think I remember it was a US Steel strike that slowed and or shut the 1955 Model Stude. line down at the end of 1954/beginning of 1955 in addition to a UAW Stude. strike also affecting Stude. Production.

            Also keep in mind that MOST of the Bodies, Frames, Wheels etc. of the Cars and Trucks were made by Budd Corp. so THEIR Steel Suppliers would be the Major ones.

            1955 was a TERRIBLE year for Studebaker Packard on top of all that, you had the Huge amount of ongoing part changes Plus the Mid-Run wrap around windshield Body change on Sedans and Wagons.
            I did not know that Budd was a major fabricator for Studebaker. Where was Budd's plant?

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            • #7
              Didn't Studebaker have their own steel plant right after WW II? I seem to recall since there was such a demand for products & limited supply changing back to a civilian economy.
              59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
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              • #8
                No offense, but I kinda thought that everyone knew about the iconic Budd operation in Philadelphia. The company rise to prominence paralleled the auto industry, as auto production burgeoned in the early teens. They were not however restricted to the automobile. You might find their stamped parts in anything that rolled, slid or flew. In the early 2000's they shut down their facility in Philly and consolidated it with their holdings in Mich.

                One of the advantages of the Budd operation was their ability to stamp much larger items then the industry norm. They were used to stamp the roofs for the 1936-37 Studebakers, which were touted to be the largest single piece stamping in automotive history.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                  No offense, but I kinda thought that everyone knew about the iconic Budd operation in Philadelphia. The company rise to prominence paralleled the auto industry, as auto production burgeoned in the early teens. They were not however restricted to the automobile. You might find their stamped parts in anything that rolled, slid or flew. In the early 2000's they shut down their facility in Philly and consolidated it with their holdings in Mich.

                  One of the advantages of the Budd operation was their ability to stamp much larger items then the industry norm. They were used to stamp the roofs for the 1936-37 Studebakers, which were touted to be the largest single piece stamping in automotive history.
                  Yes. A very innovative company that (among other things) essentially invented the stainless steel streamlined railroad car, and made them for more than 50 years.
                  Skip Lackie

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                    In the early 2000's they shut down their facility in Philly and consolidated it with their holdings in Mich.
                    They are German owned now.

                    Craig

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