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The EPA's new rules

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  • jnormanh
    replied
    While there are no Federal, (EPA) laws which will affect hobbyists, there are some local laws which effect both hobbyists and professionals. Shucks, you can't run a BBQ grill in CA.

    Learn to shop around. As bondobilly says, you might have to drive to a neighboring county, or if you live in CA, even to another state...and there are also lots of internet sites where you can order paint.

    I don't know whether it's still so, but a few years ago you could get good quality acrylic/urethane, Sherwin-Williams, in all factory colors through NAPA. They didn't stock it, but could order it overnight. Advance Auto also offered the same service.

    I still buy paint here from the local store which sells several brands. Dupont, R-M, etc.

    Just FWIW, many years ago they turned me on to DuPont's bargain brand, Nason. I've painted three cars with it, and it's great stuff. My wife's Volvo, which I painted with Nason 8 years ago, and which sits outside 24/7, still looks like the day I painted it. My Austin Healey Bugeye, show winner, has three year old Nason on it. Paint, reducer and hardener for a full size car, less than $300.

    Leave a comment:


  • jnormanh
    replied
    While there are no Federal, (EPA) laws which will affect hobbyists, there are some local laws which effect both hobbyists and professionals. Shucks, you can't run a BBQ grill in CA.

    Learn to shop around. As bondobilly says, you might have to drive to a neighboring county, or if you live in CA, even to another state...and there are also lots of internet sites where you can order paint.

    I don't know whether it's still so, but a few years ago you could get good quality acrylic/urethane, Sherwin-Williams, in all factory colors through NAPA. They didn't stock it, but could order it overnight. Advance Auto also offered the same service.

    I still buy paint here from the local store which sells several brands. Dupont, R-M, etc.

    Just FWIW, many years ago they turned me on to DuPont's bargain brand, Nason. I've painted three cars with it, and it's great stuff. My wife's Volvo, which I painted with Nason 8 years ago, and which sits outside 24/7, still looks like the day I painted it. My Austin Healey Bugeye, show winner, has three year old Nason on it. Paint, reducer and hardener for a full size car, less than $300.

    Leave a comment:


  • bondobilly
    replied
    Some of the so called "loop holes" have been closed. I just recieved a copy of Summit Racing's "Summit" Tool Catalog. Some paints and prep'ing materials are now "water based" and meet CA's new requirements for sale in the state. Here in my area (Westchester County, NY) it is against the law to sell to the public any paints that have isocyanate hardeners, or coatings with high VOC's. Two mjor autobody supply shops have closed recently in Westchester County. However as a hobbyist I can drive to either Putnam or Dutchess county and buy my paints. All of the major body shops here in my area are served by clearly defined paint/coatings manufacturers who service these body shops. All paint mixing is now done at individual body shops who have had to spend small fortunes to buy either one or more mixing systems.

    JDP said it a few weeks ago, make sure you are friendly with a local body shop so you can get your hands on paint if you need it. As for Summit they are now listing House of Kolor Direct to Metal Primer that is isocyanate free, two part chemstry that is Califonia Compliant. It omly has a pot life of 2-3 hours, and needs a minimum of three hours before sanding. Thier version of Pre-Kleno is now water based.

    Leave a comment:


  • bondobilly
    replied
    Some of the so called "loop holes" have been closed. I just recieved a copy of Summit Racing's "Summit" Tool Catalog. Some paints and prep'ing materials are now "water based" and meet CA's new requirements for sale in the state. Here in my area (Westchester County, NY) it is against the law to sell to the public any paints that have isocyanate hardeners, or coatings with high VOC's. Two mjor autobody supply shops have closed recently in Westchester County. However as a hobbyist I can drive to either Putnam or Dutchess county and buy my paints. All of the major body shops here in my area are served by clearly defined paint/coatings manufacturers who service these body shops. All paint mixing is now done at individual body shops who have had to spend small fortunes to buy either one or more mixing systems.

    JDP said it a few weeks ago, make sure you are friendly with a local body shop so you can get your hands on paint if you need it. As for Summit they are now listing House of Kolor Direct to Metal Primer that is isocyanate free, two part chemstry that is Califonia Compliant. It omly has a pot life of 2-3 hours, and needs a minimum of three hours before sanding. Thier version of Pre-Kleno is now water based.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied

    The sky has not fallen.[/blue]

    [/quote]

    Thankfully. Thanks for the reply.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied

    The sky has not fallen.[/blue]

    [/quote]

    Thankfully. Thanks for the reply.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Leave a comment:


  • jnormanh
    replied
    I still am confused by all of this. How, as an amateur, can I purchase the materials to paint my own car?

    Simply walk into a paint store and buy the paint. Some may sell only to the trade, but most will sell to anyone. There is no prohibition against selling paint retail to the public. I bought paint, reducer and hardner just last week, no questions asked.

    How, for example, do I prove I have not painted more than two cars in a year?

    You don't have to prove anyting to anyone. It works the other way - if the EPA wanted to prove you violated the law, the burden of proof would be on them. It's like proving that you haven't robbed a bank. The burden of proof is on the accusor.

    What stops me from painting somebody else's car for a profit?

    What stops you from any crime - fear of being caught.

    Does the ruling limit the type of paint an amateur can purchase/use? Seems like there are lots of loop holes.

    No, but you'll want the proper respirator and ventilation if using urethane-catalized paint. Nobody will check to make sure you don't injure yourself, that's up to you.

    The sky has not fallen.

    Leave a comment:


  • jnormanh
    replied
    I still am confused by all of this. How, as an amateur, can I purchase the materials to paint my own car?

    Simply walk into a paint store and buy the paint. Some may sell only to the trade, but most will sell to anyone. There is no prohibition against selling paint retail to the public. I bought paint, reducer and hardner just last week, no questions asked.

    How, for example, do I prove I have not painted more than two cars in a year?

    You don't have to prove anyting to anyone. It works the other way - if the EPA wanted to prove you violated the law, the burden of proof would be on them. It's like proving that you haven't robbed a bank. The burden of proof is on the accusor.

    What stops me from painting somebody else's car for a profit?

    What stops you from any crime - fear of being caught.

    Does the ruling limit the type of paint an amateur can purchase/use? Seems like there are lots of loop holes.

    No, but you'll want the proper respirator and ventilation if using urethane-catalized paint. Nobody will check to make sure you don't injure yourself, that's up to you.

    The sky has not fallen.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied
    I still am confused by all of this. How, as an amateur, can I purchase the materials to paint my own car? How, for example, do I prove I have not painted more than two cars in a year? What stops me from painting somebody else's car for a profit? Does the ruling limit the type of paint an amateur can purchase/use? Seems like there are lots of loop holes.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Leave a comment:


  • JRoberts
    replied
    I still am confused by all of this. How, as an amateur, can I purchase the materials to paint my own car? How, for example, do I prove I have not painted more than two cars in a year? What stops me from painting somebody else's car for a profit? Does the ruling limit the type of paint an amateur can purchase/use? Seems like there are lots of loop holes.

    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

    Leave a comment:


  • ralt12
    started a topic The EPA's new rules

    The EPA's new rules

    jasont@sema.org or by phone at 202/783-6007, ext. 39.

    New EPA Autobody Painting Regulation:

    Exempts hobbyists who paint two cars or less per year.
    Business operations are required to have a spray booth, proper filters and spray gun cleaners.
    EPA now requires businesses to provide initial notification to the agency on their paint operations and requires training for all employees involved in painting activities.

    Businesses must maintain in-house records verifying compliance, filter replacement and plans to control hazardous air pollutants within the facility.



    '53 Commander
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