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What happened to JDP?

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  • What happened to JDP?

    I haven't been here for a while. I used to enjoy the posts from JDP. He was a frequent poster with the old ALT forum. I noticed they stopped about a year ago. I hope nothing happened to him. Anybody have any info?

  • #2
    He's still around.
    He just got away from Studebakers.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      He's alive and well on Facebook, just not into Studebakers any more.
      sigpic
      Dave Lester

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      • #4
        Probly been pretty grumpy in recent times
        Barry'd in Studes

        Comment


        • #5
          Well I am glad he has not passed, as I feared. Hard to believe he just gave up Studebakers. Lots of knowledge there!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 57studie View Post
            Well I am glad he has not passed, as I feared. Hard to believe he just gave up Studebakers. Lots of knowledge there!!
            Agree. Though he did not drive them, mainly just flipped them. Musta drove them a lot, back in the day, though.

            Comment


            • #7
              He is the original car flipper before everyone jumped in. My guess is that when things got crowded he made his move.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by StudeMichael View Post
                He is the original car flipper before everyone jumped in. My guess is that when things got crowded he made his move.
                There seemed to be a swell of people looking for nice Studebakers a few years ago. He took advantage of the market by sprucing up nice cars and carefully marketing them. He did get out at a good time.
                I think most of us who were looking finally found our cars and the demand died back. I notice cars don't sell as fast off of eBay and the like as they did then.
                "In the heart of Arkansas."
                Searcy, Arkansas
                1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                1952 2R pickup

                Comment


                • #9
                  I believe he got bored with both retirement and Ebay; found a part time job at Best Buy; proved so good at floor sales he quickly went on to mentor the entire sales force. Bored no more!
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  '33 Rockne 10,
                  '51 Commander Starlight,
                  '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                  '56 Sky Hawk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    JDP and I partnered together on many ebay deals. He was very good at knowing exactly what would sell and when. He taught me a great deal on how to use ebay to our best advantage. He was also extrememly trusting. He sent me signed, blank checks for me to buy West Coast cars for him. And we never met. I would not be able to pick him out of a lineup. But he trusted me with his money and his very valuable ebay reputation on many occasions.
                    When the economy dried up, and the car flipping dried up, he went on to other things. We had a philosophy of leaving plenty of "meat on the bones", as they now say on American Pickers. We would accept good offers on cars we sold which also allowed the buyer to have room on the other end. We may have goofed a couple of times, but virtually all of the buyers were quite happy with what they got for the money they spent. He maintained a 100% satisfaction rating on ebay for the entire time I knew him. Great guy to work with.
                    sals54

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sals54 View Post
                      JDP and I partnered together on many ebay deals. He was also extrememly trusting. He sent me signed, blank checks for me to buy West Coast cars for him. And we never met. I would not be able to pick him out of a lineup. But he trusted me with his money and his very valuable ebay reputation on many occasions. Great guy to work with.
                      Well, Sal, good people attract good people. Those here may not know I bought a GT on eBay. It was in Sal's neighborhood, so he picked up, held it for me for some months and then sold it for me and sent the check. And we've never met and I wouldn't be able to pick him out of a lineup. Thanks again, Sal.

                      jack vines
                      PackardV8

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                      • #12
                        I will "pile on" by also adding some good JDP stories. He and I were good buddies for ~25 years, despite the fact that we were polar opposites (exception was Studebakers) in many ways. He took me on my first trip (a full week) to South Bend, and gave me a tour of all the Stude buildings and sites. And because he was a South Bend native and had a great gift of gab, he got me (unescorted) into the upper floors of both Newman & Altman and Avanti Parts Corp (the successor to the Stude parts warehouse). I spent the week peeking into every single parts bin in both buildings. Every evening I would come downstairs with boxes full of stuff, fill out a list of what I had on a piece of notebook paper, and put the booty into our car. Didn't settle up until the end of the week. It's one of my fondest memories.

                        He sold me several cars, and even more parts over many years -- still have all the vehicles. He found me an NOS 246 Commander 6 engine for my 3R6 pickup. When my 3R6 got totalled on the way to a meet a few years later, he found me a 3R5 parts truck, and helped me do the transplant of all the undamaged drive train parts into the 3R5. When he ran across a huge stash of Stude literature, he would just give it all to me and tell me to give him back what I didn't want. We kept track of who owed who how much on scraps of paper -- no auditing of discussion required.

                        Although he enjoyed flipping Studebakers, it was more for the fun of it than for the money. He was too honest and trusting to really make a lot of money at it. As rockne10 said above, he finally got bored with the hobby and moved on to something else.
                        Last edited by Skip Lackie; 04-15-2018, 02:15 PM.
                        Skip Lackie

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                        • #13
                          Adding to Skip's "pile on", I think most of us in the general DC area had JDP stories. I knew him probably about the same length of time as Skip so a lot of the stories are too long to post here, but I had a lot of good experiences with JDP. We sort of competed for dealer buyouts, but he was a whole lot better than me. But, when he found something that he knew I needed, I always got first shot at it at a VERY reasonable price (many times free). One of the freebies was a NOS '53 C/K trunk mat. That was extremely rare even that far back. On the other hand, he wanted a dealer parts book rack. I already had one and had gotten another one at a dealer I bought out. That went to him.

                          One of our deals was an engine change on my '64 8E-7 Champ. Long story, but I bought it in Berkeley, CA out of a foreign car salvage yard where it had spent its life from new as a yard truck. The yard owner had a soft spot for Studebakers having bought the truck new, 259 with a five-speed. He had a lot of clutch trouble with the truck so he converted it to a Powershift and also put a '63 Lark front end on the truck. I bought the truck for $200 and drove it home. It was incredibly dinged up, the bed was full of grease and crud and the engine was VERY tired. I found a wrecked '64 Avanti in the same yard and bought it too for (I think) $100. The wheels, power steering and front suspension, rear end, dash w/AC, seats were all gone, but the R-1 engine and Powershift were still there though the air cleaner and hood were gone. Anyhow, after I cleaned the water and rust out of the engine (another long story), I decided to use that engine in the Champ to replace the tired 259. I had steam cleaned the bed and chassis so it was getting half way presentable. Had to buy a tailgate. Ordered it from Standard Surplus for $12.50 and the shipping cost me $17.50. Bob Peterson can remember that deal as he helped out back then too. Anyhow, when I was transferred to Boston from California, the Champ pulled our 18-foot travel trailer to Washington state, to Yellowstone and on (nearly 5,000 miles total). When gas went way up (like to $1.99 or so for high octane), I decided to unload the R-1 engine. JDP had just parted a '64 Cruiser with 90,000 miles. We found that the 289 was in great condition so I worked a deal with him so he could have the R-1 if he did all the swap work and installed the regular 289. I believe that the R-1 engine went to Jim Turner. The truck ran for more years until it was totaled in a head-on collision in the '80s.

                          One of his parts buys was kind of funny. He had visited the old Studebaker dealer in Parsons, WV and one item he found was a NOS M-series cab. When he went back to get everything, the cab was gone. When he asked about it, the dealer said he gave it to his brother (or brother-in-law) to use on a farm truck.

                          He bought a car from me, a '61 Lark convertible, that I ran on eBay. When I delivered it to him in Annapolis, he was pleased that it started and moved OK. He patched the floors, but when he saw the rust where the top mechanism mounted, he gave up and sold it at a loss. No hard feelings though because he knew it was accurately described. Later he called me to tell me that there was a '47 Commander five-passenger coupe in a back yard in Annapolis. I told him I'd like to have it so he went to the seller who was asking $400, handed him $200 and closed the deal. Demonstrating how dumb we can be, I went to the location, hooked up the car with a bumper towbar and successfully pulled it over a 100 miles on its bald rotten tires. The engine was full of water (the hood ornament was off and the spark plugs were all out). JDP was working for Big A Automotive then. He called me and told me that he bought two rebuilt ohv sixes. He had a buyer for one and made a deal with me that he would give me one of the two if I delivered it to Boston. That worked fine for me because I had lined up a factory rebuilt Commander 226 that was for sale in Boston. So, I took the ohv engine up and came back with the 226 flathead.

                          Wow! Too many stories and too little time. Enough for now for sure.
                          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                          • #14
                            I'd like to share a JDP story. I bought the 64 hardtop off of John and lamented about the limited garage space I had at home to do everything I wanted to on the car. He offered for me to keep the car at his place and work on it there. He gave me one of his two indoor garage spaces and I would go over there most weekends for a full year tearing the car to the frame, repairing rust, welding, etc. JDP said I could use all his tools and equipment and he often helped me with the restoration. All for free. I am grateful for this.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Trusting a complete stranger with ones "scarole" is huge!
                              Originally posted by sals54 View Post
                              JDP and I partnered together on many ebay deals. He was very good at knowing exactly what would sell and when. He taught me a great deal on how to use ebay to our best advantage. He was also extrememly trusting. He sent me signed, blank checks for me to buy West Coast cars for him. And we never met. I would not be able to pick him out of a lineup. But he trusted me with his money and his very valuable ebay reputation on many occasions.
                              When the economy dried up, and the car flipping dried up, he went on to other things. We had a philosophy of leaving plenty of "meat on the bones", as they now say on American Pickers. We would accept good offers on cars we sold which also allowed the buyer to have room on the other end. We may have goofed a couple of times, but virtually all of the buyers were quite happy with what they got for the money they spent. He maintained a 100% satisfaction rating on ebay for the entire time I knew him. Great guy to work with.

                              Comment

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