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  • #16
    I've got to agree with StudeBob... I'm certainly no mechanic but I find myself doing tuneups, replacing fuel pumps, spring bushings, shocks, bearings, brake jobs and removing gas tanks (that's Wednesday night's project!![:I]) on my Transtar that I would never think of doing to my 2000 Brand X. [:0][:0] I think it's partly because it's "fun" (and a great way to get to know all the in and outs of your Studebaker) and because when I look under the hood or underneath I recognize all of the parts that I see[] (I did pay a bit of attention in high school autoshop back in the '70's) and it actually seems to be built for an amateur like myself to work on... That said, I recognize that certain jobs are beyond my skill level - like wheel alignments and replacing that pesky driveshaft support bearing (don't have a arbor press), but newer vehicles with all the technology... [8] If there's a problem, call the autoclub and have her taken to the shop![B)][V]

    <h5>Mark
    '57 Transtar
    3E-6/7-122
    </h5>
    Mark Hayden
    '66 Commander
    Zone Coordinator
    Pacific Can-Am Zone

    Comment


    • #17
      I've got to agree with StudeBob... I'm certainly no mechanic but I find myself doing tuneups, replacing fuel pumps, spring bushings, shocks, bearings, brake jobs and removing gas tanks (that's Wednesday night's project!![:I]) on my Transtar that I would never think of doing to my 2000 Brand X. [:0][:0] I think it's partly because it's "fun" (and a great way to get to know all the in and outs of your Studebaker) and because when I look under the hood or underneath I recognize all of the parts that I see[] (I did pay a bit of attention in high school autoshop back in the '70's) and it actually seems to be built for an amateur like myself to work on... That said, I recognize that certain jobs are beyond my skill level - like wheel alignments and replacing that pesky driveshaft support bearing (don't have a arbor press), but newer vehicles with all the technology... [8] If there's a problem, call the autoclub and have her taken to the shop![B)][V]

      <h5>Mark
      '57 Transtar
      3E-6/7-122
      </h5>
      Mark Hayden
      '66 Commander
      Zone Coordinator
      Pacific Can-Am Zone

      Comment


      • #18
        quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

        but IF you're not one to get your hands greazy and have a bit of mechanical savvy - you're gonna be crippled right out of the gate

        My point is, saying that these aging mounts are an advantage is deluding yourself IF you have to depend on someone else to maintain it for you.


        Studebaker DRIVERS are a rare breed and we wear that badge proudly. It's not SO exclusive that others can't join. It's just that a big dollop of reality has to be swallowed and digested to be able to be a member. Either that or one heck of a resevoir of patience and money.[^]

        SO true- not only with Studes, but with any old car. There comes a point where low mileage has limited value, because the simple passing of decades destroys so much! Paint, rubber, and cloth are obvious to anyone when they're aged; but too many don't realize what time does to fuel pumps, water pumps, suspension bushings, oil seals, brake cylinders, etc. These all deteriorate with time, regardless of how well kept or low mileage a vehicle is! This is where folks get hurt- i.e. a 259 3spd. OD is a very solid, dependable setup that will give tons of great, dependable service based on their design; but design can't protect that cracked factory gas hose that fails without warning because of dry-rot.

        So many times we see folks selling sweet old cars of all makes for sale on eBay. One such seller a couple years ago summed it up perfectly in his very honest description of a beautiful car:

        "I had dreamed of owning one of these for many years, and finally realized that dream two years ago. I have loved owning this car, but I did not understand what it takes to keep one of these beauties running for real-world use; so now I must pass her on to someone with more knowledge and/or interest to learn mechanical repair than I."

        Would that all new to the hobby could read and heed that statement; folks would be MUCH better prepared, or save themselves unnecessary heartache- and cost...[B)]

        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
        Parish, central NY 13131


        Comment


        • #19
          quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

          but IF you're not one to get your hands greazy and have a bit of mechanical savvy - you're gonna be crippled right out of the gate

          My point is, saying that these aging mounts are an advantage is deluding yourself IF you have to depend on someone else to maintain it for you.


          Studebaker DRIVERS are a rare breed and we wear that badge proudly. It's not SO exclusive that others can't join. It's just that a big dollop of reality has to be swallowed and digested to be able to be a member. Either that or one heck of a resevoir of patience and money.[^]

          SO true- not only with Studes, but with any old car. There comes a point where low mileage has limited value, because the simple passing of decades destroys so much! Paint, rubber, and cloth are obvious to anyone when they're aged; but too many don't realize what time does to fuel pumps, water pumps, suspension bushings, oil seals, brake cylinders, etc. These all deteriorate with time, regardless of how well kept or low mileage a vehicle is! This is where folks get hurt- i.e. a 259 3spd. OD is a very solid, dependable setup that will give tons of great, dependable service based on their design; but design can't protect that cracked factory gas hose that fails without warning because of dry-rot.

          So many times we see folks selling sweet old cars of all makes for sale on eBay. One such seller a couple years ago summed it up perfectly in his very honest description of a beautiful car:

          "I had dreamed of owning one of these for many years, and finally realized that dream two years ago. I have loved owning this car, but I did not understand what it takes to keep one of these beauties running for real-world use; so now I must pass her on to someone with more knowledge and/or interest to learn mechanical repair than I."

          Would that all new to the hobby could read and heed that statement; folks would be MUCH better prepared, or save themselves unnecessary heartache- and cost...[B)]

          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
          Parish, central NY 13131


          Comment


          • #20
            Had the first problem with Betty last night, In the cold last night, she didn't want to start. Finally got her going and had a rough idle. So, ended up shutting her down and checked/cleaned the points and put the spare coil on. That got her going. Then on the way home, she started stalling and popping at stoplights, pulled over and found the choke was stuck full open, made that adjustment. Got the car home and fiddled some more with the mixture/choke settings and got it running good again. I'm thinkin the fuel pump might be starting to let go or there may be junk in the tank/lines. After setting her up, drove around the block and when the car would go to idle, she would die out if i didnt feather the gas pedal. Today will be checking the fuel pressure, etc to see where the issue lies. So, as Mr Biggs and Bams have noted, you have to go into this knowing that there will be problems, have a good sense of humor, be willing to get your hands dirty and not be to proud to ask for advice wehn things go south. That is the sweet thing about this club, at one point or another someone has/had the same problem and can help advise what to do to fix it.

            Comment


            • #21
              Had the first problem with Betty last night, In the cold last night, she didn't want to start. Finally got her going and had a rough idle. So, ended up shutting her down and checked/cleaned the points and put the spare coil on. That got her going. Then on the way home, she started stalling and popping at stoplights, pulled over and found the choke was stuck full open, made that adjustment. Got the car home and fiddled some more with the mixture/choke settings and got it running good again. I'm thinkin the fuel pump might be starting to let go or there may be junk in the tank/lines. After setting her up, drove around the block and when the car would go to idle, she would die out if i didnt feather the gas pedal. Today will be checking the fuel pressure, etc to see where the issue lies. So, as Mr Biggs and Bams have noted, you have to go into this knowing that there will be problems, have a good sense of humor, be willing to get your hands dirty and not be to proud to ask for advice wehn things go south. That is the sweet thing about this club, at one point or another someone has/had the same problem and can help advise what to do to fix it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Just found the cause of the rough running and stalling... the gasket from the fuel line to carb, let go.. when i picked up the hood this morning, there was the strong smell of gas, found that the fitting was moist. Disconnected it from the carb, the fitting was loose and the gasket was split. I put on a spare gasket and now its running great again..took it around the block, no more stalling.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Just found the cause of the rough running and stalling... the gasket from the fuel line to carb, let go.. when i picked up the hood this morning, there was the strong smell of gas, found that the fitting was moist. Disconnected it from the carb, the fitting was loose and the gasket was split. I put on a spare gasket and now its running great again..took it around the block, no more stalling.

                  Comment

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